Division of Humanities

A college education that will serve you throughout your life does more than develop technical skills – it fosters the ability to learn, reinvent yourself, and to solve some of the world’s weightiest problems. Courses within the Division of Humanities will teach you how to think creatively and critically, to reason, and to ask questions. These uniquely human attributes can never be replicated by artificial intelligence or machines, and they will ensure your ability to create value and find success in a rapidly changing world. Companies and organizations that want to stay globally competitive realize they need employees who can collaborate as team members and who are multi-disciplinary, creative thinkers. Humanities coursework prepares you to meet these needs by challenging you to develop problem-solving skills and to gain insights from a variety of sources–from poetry to politics.

Within this Division is the Center for Global Citizenship, a unique academic resource that touches all aspects of life at Becker College. Because of resources like this and the emphasis on the Agile Mindset–empathy, divergent thinking, an entrepreneurial outlook, and social and emotional intelligence–you will graduate with the skills and the mindset to thrive in a world that is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous.


Global Citizenship

Bachelor of Arts Global Citizenship

Bachelor of Arts in Global Citizenship

The Bachelor of Arts in Global Citizenship at Becker College, the first of its kind in the country, responds to students’ sense of urgency to live the Becker mission and core values of community, diversity, and social responsibility. This degree is distinguished from majors in global studies or international relations found at other American colleges and universities. The Becker degree reflects a shift towards issues of social justice and human rights and provides a more engaged role for students as they adapt their scholarship to real-life applications. Graduates will fulfill a growing demand for globally competent and cross-culturally trained employees.


Liberal Arts

Bachelor of Arts Liberal Arts

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts

Studying liberal arts is one effective way to prepare for engaging in an ever-evolving and ever-changing world. The liberal arts programs provide you with balanced exposure to major achievements in the arts, sciences, humanities, and social sciences. In-depth study of a particular area of interest will prepare you for specialized graduate work in law, government, humanities, social services or administration, journalism, communication, public policy/organization, and secondary and undergraduate education.

Why earn a degree in liberal arts, global citizenship, or education at Becker?

The coursework in the Division of Humanities complements your professional studies to prepare you with a deep understanding of the working world. It is an essential part of the transformational experience that you find at Becker. Each course builds a foundation that prepares you to be an adaptable problem solver – one who can grapple with the challenges of a diverse and changing world. With this foundation, you can enter the workforce with such skills as critical thinking, an empathetic understanding of multiple perspectives, and clear, effective communication. Liberal arts and global citizenship (the first program of its kind in the country) are degrees without borders. Our graduates can apply what they know to the broadest range of industries and are equipped with a flexible set of skills that allow them to achieve immediate success in companies in the new economy and to translate those skills in the future to fields that do not yet exist. The Division of Humanities strives to develop responsible, aware, and informed citizens who are dedicated to improving the lives of those in their own country and in the global community.

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