General Education

Becker College provides a foundation in learning agility that equips students to navigate change and create value in the complex, hyper-connected, automated world, in a supportive, hands-on learning environment. We refer to this approach as the Agile Mindset. The Agile Mindset values knowledge and the power of learning, with specific core competencies in: empathy to understand what people need and create new opportunities; divergent thinking to understand problems and all possible solutions; an entrepreneurial outlook to innovate opportunity regardless of job or position; and social and emotional intelligence to collaborate effectively in trans-disciplinary teams.

Central to the general education program is the Agile Mindset Core Curriculum.  This curriculum is a series of five courses (four courses for transfer students with 12 or more credits and the equivalent of ENGL1001) called the CORE.  Our CORE general education curriculum provides students a foundation in: the Agile Mindset and learning agility, fundamental skills in written, oral and visual communication, and a series of modules for career exploration, strategy, and planning, to align and leverage skills from the professional majors to collectively create a transformational learning experience.

Becker College believes that an educated person should also possess an understanding of the humanities, social sciences, hard sciences, and mathematics. Consequently, each academic program at the College contains courses in these primary domains of human knowledge.  These courses complement the CORE and include developing competency in critical thinking and analysis, sensitivity to ethical and moral issues in society, and appreciation of artistic endeavors.  The goal of preparing students to succeed in a rapidly-changing global society not only requires students to develop an Agile Mindset, but also to develop a commitment to the value of learning throughout their lives.

Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

(These are minimum requirements; individual degree programs may have more extensive requirements in any area.)

CORE Curriculum – 15 credits

CORE1001 Managing Transitions: Change as a Norm
OR CORE1500 Managing Change and Navigating Unstructured Problems *
CORE-ENGL The New Normal: Exploring Unstructured Problems
CORE2003 Needfinding: Uncovering Opportunity in Human Need
CORE3004 Entrepreneurial Mindset: Creating and Capturing Value
CORE4005 Agile Mindset Capstone

ENGL1003 Writing About Literature – 3 credits
History – 3 credits
Math – 6 credits
Natural Science – 7 credits
Social Science/Humanities – 3 credits
Global Awareness and Diversity – 3 credits

*Transfer students with 12 or more credits will take CORE1500 in place of CORE1001. Those students with 12+ transfer credits who are transferring in an equivalent course to ENGL 1001 (English Composition) will have already satisfied the requirement for CORE-ENGL.

Requirements for the Associate’s Degree

(These are minimum requirements; individual degree programs may have more extensive requirements in any area.)

CORE Curriculum – 6 credits

CORE1001 Managing Transitions: Change as a Norm
OR CORE1500 Managing Change and Navigating Unstructured Problems*
CORE-ENGL The New Normal: Exploring Unstructured Problems

ENGL1003 Writing About Literature – 3 credits
Natural Science/Math – 3 credits
Natural Science – 3 credits
Social Science/Humanities/History – 6 credits

*Transfer students with 12 or more credits will take CORE1500 in place of CORE1001. Those students with 12+ transfer credits who are transferring in an equivalent course to ENGL1001 (English Composition) will have already satisfied the requirement for CORE-ENGL.

Students may be required to enroll in a foundational mathematics course depending on the results of freshmen testing. Students must satisfactorily complete the foundational mathematics course prior to enrollment in any subsequent mathematics course

General Education Learning Outcomes

Written and oral communication

Students will demonstrate ethical writing in all forms of written communication.

Students will demonstrate the ability to complete a variety of writing projects and oral presentations using effective principles of organization and acceptable grammar, integrating multiple sources and citing them appropriately, and varying elements depending on audience/reader characteristics and the purposes of the communication.

Mathematics

Students will demonstrate the ability to interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables, and schematics.

Students will demonstrate the ability to represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically, and verbally.

Students will demonstrate the ability to employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.

Students will demonstrate the ability to estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.

Students will demonstrate the ability to recognize the limits of mathematical and statistical methods.

Students will demonstrate the ability to use technology to obtain, analyze, understand, and share information.

Students will be able to apply math knowledge in areas other than math.

Students will be able to read, write, and communicate about mathematics.

Students will demonstrate ability to use standard mathematical concept they have learned in non-standard situations (problems) – ability to think critically.

Natural Sciences

Students will demonstrate knowledge/application of critical thinking skills, within the realm of science, utilizing where appropriate: instruments of science technology, mathematical applications, and/or data-based decision making.

Students will demonstrate written/oral communication skills appropriate for scientific disciplines.

Students will demonstrate scientific literacy required for personal decision-making as related to social, cultural, political, and ethical scientific issues.

Global Awareness and Diversity

Students will demonstrate awareness of human histories and the perspectives they create and how they affect the world.

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness of all peoples throughout the world.

Students will demonstrate an awareness of the existence of stereotypes and a commitment to the reductions of prejudice rooted in stereotypes.

Students will demonstrate an awareness of the need to build an inclusive academic community.

Humanities and Social Sciences

Students will demonstrate the capability to think historically and chronologically, identifying the “domino effect” of historical events from various historical periods through the present.

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the connections between the history of an era and other disciplines of the same era: literature, economics, philosophy, war, politics, science, and popular culture.

Students will demonstrate an awareness of the interconnectedness of the past, present, and future.

Students will demonstrate an awareness of different perspectives, political, religious, and social agendas that willfully distort history.

Students will demonstrate a willingness to overcome prejudices and stereotypes in search of truth.

Students will demonstrate knowledge of, and ability to apply, appropriate theory from at least two of the disciplines of social science to a contemporary problem in order to develop and weigh competing hypotheses.

Students will demonstrate application of critical thinking to separate factual information from inferences and identify inappropriate conclusions.

Technology and Society:

Students will improve basic computer literacy related to computer hardware, software, operating systems, security, and networking.

Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of why computers and the Internet are essential components in today’s global society through written or oral assignments.

Students will research, analyze, and discuss the ethical, social and legal issues of technology and the impact on society through individual and collaborative inquiry.

Health Education:

Students will demonstrate the ability to identify and discuss the lifestyle behaviors that support optimal health across one or more of the following dimensions of wellness:  physical, social, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and environmental/occupational.

Students will demonstrate an ability to apply critical thinking skills when describing choices related to personal wellness, including identification and evaluation of available resources.

Students will demonstrate an ability to discuss the current scientific thinking on important health topics, including the impact among people of different ages, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

 

 

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