Course Descriptions

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» Special Topics Courses

A

» ACAD1001 First Year Experience 2 cr.
» ACCT1001 Financial Accounting 3 cr.
» ACCT1002 Managerial Accounting 3 cr.
» ACCT2004 Entrepreneurial Accounting 3 cr.
» ANSC1003 Animal Care Management 3 cr.
» ANSC1005 Kennel Operation and Design 3 cr.
» ANSC1010 Animal Health Skills 3 cr.
» ANSC1201 Introduction to Grooming 1 cr.
» ANSC1400 Introduction to Animal Science 3 cr.
» ANSC1601 Introduction to Equine Handling and Management
» ANSC2000 Introduction to Laboratory Animal Science 2 cr.
» ANSC2200 Dog Obedience 2 cr.
» ANSC2201 Intermediate Grooming 2 cr.
» ANSC2202 Domestic Animal Behavior 3 cr.
» ANSC2401 Animal Nutrition 3 cr.
» ANSC2403 Equine Nutrition 3 cr.
» ANSC2501 Animal Breeding 3 cr.
» ANSC2701 Equine Anatomy and Physiology 3 cr.
» ANSC2900 Externship Module I - 3 cr.
» ANSC3100 Animals in Society 3 cr. 
» ANSC3401 Lab Animal Technical Methods I – 4 cr.
» ANSC3402 Lab Animal Technical Methods II – 4 cr.
» ANSC3503 Equine Reproduction and Breeding Management 3 cr.
» ANSC4700 The World of Research 3 cr.
» ANSC4900 Externship Module IIa – 3 cr.
» ANSC4901 Externship Module IIb - 3 cr.
» ANTH3200 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr.
» ARTS1002 Visual Design 3cr.
» ARTS1003 Art History I 3 cr.
» ARTS1004 Art History II 3 cr.
» ARTS1100 Principles of Drawing 3 cr.
» ARTS1201 Drawing Studio: Systems and Techniques 3 cr.
» ARTS1202 Painting Studio 3 cr.
» ARTS1301 Principles of Design 3 cr.
» ARTS1401 3D Design 3 cr.
» ARTS1801 Printmaking 3 cr.
» ARTS2003 Contemporary Art History 3 cr.
» ARTS2100 Drawing II 3 cr.
» ARTS2300 Color Theory 3 cr.
» ARTS2309 Rendering and Presentation 3 cr.
» ARTS2400 Cartooning Basics 3 cr.
» ARTS2500 Digital Photography
» ARTS2800 Life Drawing 3 cr.
» ARTS3100 Applied Aesthetics 3 cr.
» ARTS4000 Integrated Team Project 3 cr.
» ARTS4001 Capstone Project 3 cr.
» ARTS4100 Design Portfolio 3 cr.
» ARTS4500 Career Internship 3 cr.

ACAD1001 First Year Experience 2 cr.

The focus of this course is on ways to support students during their transition to college-level learning and to enhance connections between and among students and faculty. Students address behaviors and attitudes that are most consistently identified with achieving success in college.  Students who do not pass this class are required to retake it until a passing grade is earned.

ACCT1001 Financial Accounting 3 cr.

This course introduces the nature and purpose of accounting in our economy and its business organizations. The focus is on the fundamental steps in the accounting cycle using manual and computer applications. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret financial statements, apply basic principles and procedures for statement preparation, understand the nature of double-entry bookkeeping and accrual accounting, understand the nature and role of professional accounting standards, and, most importantly, understand what the numbers mean. Financial accounting activities are concerned with the proper recording of financial data and the preparation of financial statements and reports (including the income statement, balance sheet, statement of owners’ equity, and cash flow statement) that provide information about the firm’s past performance and current financial position. Such statements and reports are intended for “external” decision makers, who are not involved in the day-to-day management of the enterprise, such as stockholders, banks, suppliers, other creditors, employees, taxing authorities and other government agencies, and other external stakeholders. The fundamental need for financial accounting is to reduce the principal-agent problem by measuring and monitoring agents’ (i.e., managers’) performance and reporting the results to interested users, including, but not limited to, stockholders, bondholders, regulatory agencies, and the tax man.

ACCT1002 Managerial Accounting 3 cr.

This course is designed to expose students to the theory and practice of selecting and analyzing managerial and financial accounting information for internal use by managers for decision-making, planning, directing and controlling purposes. In financial accounting, management accounting information is usually confidential and used by management, instead of publicly reported; forward-looking, instead of historical; and pragmatically computed, instead of complying with accounting standards. The students will learn to design and apply systems to calculate costs for job-orders and operational process, analyze cost behavior through variable costing and activity-based costing, generate pricing and profit analysis and plans, calculate standard costs, develop flexible budgets, analyze overhead costs, do business segment analysis, and make capital budgeting decisions. Prerequisites: ACCT1001.

ACCT2004 Entrepreneurial Accounting 3 cr.

This course is designed for students who are doing a minor in business and meets the accounting requirements for students in the CIS concentration.  The course focuses on the business process to make financial statements relevant emphasizing the relationship between business and accounting with a presentation of topics that emphasizes an explanation of accounting concepts based on balance sheet order.   The course spotlights the risks, controls, ethics, and governance of a business including a comparison of Generally Accepted Accounting Standards and International Financial Reporting Standards.

Topic introductions and in-class activities are supplemented with an on-line homework manager assessment to review chapter highlights and provide self-graded assignments.  In addition, students will use materials introduced to complete a continuing serial problem to follow the progression of business operations.  Prerequisites: ENGL1001 or concurrent enrollment; MATH1200 or concurrent enrollment.

ANSC1003 Animal Care Management 3 cr.

An introductory course offering the basic care of most companion animals. Emphasis is on feeding, breeding, health maintenance, and housing of various species (dogs, cats, ferrets, birds, fish, rodents, etc.). Offered in fall only.

ANSC1005 Kennel Operation and Design 3 cr.

This is an introductory course to the operation and design of a professional kennel such as a private boarding facility, a public or private animal shelter, humane society or training facility. Emphasis is on animal handling, sanitation, disinfection, proper feeding, watering and housing and basic health and behavior issues. The student is exposed to many different types of operations and introduced to various career opportunities. Rotations in the Becker Veterinary Clinic kennels to learn and practice husbandry techniques are part of the laboratory requirements. Both lecture and laboratory consist of 2 hours each.  Restriction:  Animal Care and Laboratory Animal Management students
only.

ANSC1010 Animal Health Skills 3 cr.

This course introduces the student to more in-depth skills involving animal care and handling, concentrating on the dog and cat. Anatomy and physiology, diseases and conditions affecting these species and entry level skills such as first aid, intramuscular and subcutaneous injection techniques, obtaining vital signs, bandaging and splinting techniques and basic laboratory procedures are taught. Both lecture and laboratory, 2 hours per week. Husbandry rotations in the Becker Veterinary Clinic are required. Pre-requisite ANSC1005 – Kennel Operation and Design.

ANSC1201 Introduction to Grooming 1 cr.

Acquaints students with the basic practical techniques for grooming dogs and cats. Students learn the foundations of brushing, bathing, nail trimming, dematting and how to handle and restrain animals being groomed. Offered in spring only.

ANSC1400 Introduction to Animal Science 3 cr.

An introduction to the broad field of animal science. The course develops a basic understanding of each of the major types of domestic animals, with particular attention to nutrition and reproduction. Offered in spring only.

ANSC1601 Introduction to Equine Handling and Management  - see EQST1601 Foundation in Equine Care

ANSC2000 Introduction to Laboratory Animal Science 2 cr.

An introduction to the laboratory animal research environment, this course focuses on the fundamentals of applied anatomy and physiology, physical examination, animal husbandry, and identification in selected small animal laboratory species. Sentinel programs, equipment and regulatory topics are also covered. Basic nursing skills are introduced and reinforced in laboratories including animal restraint, dose calculations, hygiene, disinfectants and sterilization techniques. Pre-requisites: ANSC1005, ANSC1010, BIOL1002 or concurrent. Usually offered in the fall.  Restriction:  Animal Care and Laboratory Animal Management students only.

ANSC2200 Dog Obedience 2 cr.

Students learn the basic training of dogs by learning the practical application of dog teaching theories and training techniques. Hands-on sessions with dogs, plus general information about dog behavior, correcting problems, puppy prep school, human animal bonding, pet-owner counseling and assistance dogs. In addition to class time, students are required to spend a minimum of 45 minutes in daily independent work/exercise. Prerequisites: Sophomore status in the Animal Care program; ANSC1005, ANSC1010.

ANSC2201 Intermediate Grooming 2 cr.

A continuation of the introductory course, involving classroom instruction and laboratory experience focusing on trimming and clipping techniques and procedures. Attention is given to types and methods of grooming the various breeds.  Prerequisite: Sophomore status in the Animal Care program; ANSC1005, ANSC1010, ANSC1201.

ANSC2202 Domestic Animal Behavior 3 cr.

A generalized overview of the fundamental principles of animal behavior, including patterns of behavior and the influence of structure, physiology, heredity, and experience on behavior. Prerequisite: ANSC1003 or ANSC1400.  Offered in spring only.

ANSC2401 Animal Nutrition 3 cr.

An introduction to proper feeding practices for both large and small animals. Nutrients and their function, as well as feeds and their components are surveyed. The importances of balancing rations of many animal species are studied. Feeding practices for the various stages of life are also covered. Prerequisite: ANSC1400.  Offered in fall only.

ANSC2403 Equine Nutrition 3 cr.

A discussion of the nutritional needs of horses, including requirements for growth, work, and reproduction, as well as dietary formulation and management of horses with special needs.  This includes a review of the digestive anatomy and physiology, discussion of nutrients and their functions, sources of these nutrients for equine diets, and formulation of diets specific to horses. Also included are ration balancing and evaluation of forage and feed quality, as well as the diseases associated with poor nutrition. Students are required to formulate a specific feeding regimen. Pre-requisites: EQST1601 or BIOL1005/1006 or ANSC1400.

ANSC2501 Animal Breeding 3 cr.

A demonstration of how to achieve the improvement of animals through the application of genetics. Breeding systems for the various classes of livestock and the use of accurate breeding records are stressed. Open to sophomore Animal Care students. Prerequisite: ANSC1003 or ANSC1400; and BIOL1001/BIOL1002 or BIOL1005/BIOL1006. Offered in spring only.

ANSC2701 Equine Anatomy and Physiology 3 cr.

A discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the horse, concentrating on the musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and the respiratory systems, with an emphasis on the application of this knowledge to improve care and management of the horse.

ANSC2900 Externship Module I - 3 cr.

Students perform a minimum of 150 hours of work in an animal care facility of their choosing. With the assistance of the externship coordinator, students may select to work in kennels, animal shelters, grooming parlors, biomedical research facilities, zoos, marine aquariums or any other location where they will receive valuable experience in the care of animals. Upon completion, students will present the externship coordinator with an evaluation form detailing their performance along with a daily journal and a summary paper. Most students meet this requirement during the summer between their freshman and sophomore years. Prerequisite: ANSC1003, 1005, 1010, 1400 and BIOL1001; cumulative GPA 2.0. Offered fall and spring.

ANSC3100 Animals in Society 3 cr.

This is a comprehensive study of the relationship of animals in society. Beginning with an overview of various ethical theories and positions, the changing and evolving role of animals in society dating back to the early domestication of dogs will be explored from both practical and ethical views. Topics such as the human-animal bond, biomedical research, exhibit animals, euthanasia, wildlife and its impact on ecosystems, the psychology of animal hoarding, the animal-human abuse link, and international animal welfare will be covered. Class discussion and case studies will be a vital part of the class structure. A C or better is required in prescribed programs. Pre-requisites: Junior status and PSYC1001 OR SOCI1001.

ANSC3401 Lab Animal Technical Methods I- 4 cr.

This series of courses is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the major species of animals used in biomedical research. Topics include genetics and breeding as they relate to laboratory animal colony management, proper maintenance of healthy and sterile lab environments, laboratory safety and quality assurance issues as well as advanced handling and technical diagnostic techniques. Common laboratory animal diseases, pharmacology, and surgical nursing techniques are presented as they apply to this population. Recognition of normal status as well as signs of abnormal through physical examination, lab values, and observation of behavior is covered. The first semester focuses on rats, mice, dogs, fish and non-human primates. The lecture consists of 3 hours per week and laboratory component is 2 hours per week. Some off-campus laboratory sessions may be required. Students are required to participate in regularly scheduled husbandry rotations with the program laboratory animals. Prerequisites: ANSC2000 or VTSC2000.

ANSC3402 Lab Animal Technical Methods II – 4 cr.

This is a continuation of ANSC3401 and concentrates on guinea pigs, cats, rabbits as well as hamsters, gerbils, and other non-traditional small research animals.  Livestock species such as sheep, goats and pigs will also be covered.  This course continues to focus on technical diagnostic techniques includes sample collection. In addition, advanced research methodologies will be examined, including studies and models for various protocols. Record keeping is emphasized as well as technical writing. The lecture consists of 3 hours per week and the laboratory component is 2 hours per week. Some off-campus laboratory sessions may be required. Students are again expected to participate in the regularly scheduled husbandry rotations with the program laboratory animals. Prerequisite:  ANSC3401.

ANSC3503 Equine Reproduction and Breeding Management 3 cr.

This course deals specifically with the management of the business of breeding horses and the care needed for stallions at stud, brood mares, and foals. Topics include the estrus cycle as well as methods of controlling the cycle, the causes of infertility in both the stallion and mare, get an overview of artificial insemination, and the role of genetics in conformation. Prerequisites: EQST1601; ANSC2701; or BIOL1005, 1006 and VTSC2201.

ANSC4700 The World of Research 3 cr.

This is a course that explores and discusses topics and issues that concern researchers and research facilities. The types of research being conducted, research protocols, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, regulatory inspections, public opinion, grant funding, and ethics and welfare are some of the areas covered. Whenever possible, guest lecturers who are experts in their field are utilized. Students are required to write and present a research proposal and a research report using mock data. Prerequisites:  ANSC3402.

ANSC4900 Externship Module IIa – 3 cr.

This course incorporates on-site training in a laboratory animal facility. The student is required to fulfill 200 hours at a site chosen with the externship coordinator. While at this site the student is expected to act in a professional manner as a representative of the College while she/he learns new skills and techniques. May be taken concurrently with ANSC4901 as long as the prerequisite requirements for that course are met.  Prerequisite:  ANSC3402.

ANSC4901 Externship Module IIb - 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of ANSC4900 and may be taken concurrently as long as the prerequisite requirement is met. An additional 200 hours of on-site training may be completed at the same site as ANSC4900 or a different site. Pre-requisite: ANSC4900 (or concurrent).

ANTH3200 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr. – see HUMN2200 Cultural Anthropology

ARTS1002 Visual Design 3cr.

What makes a visual image exciting and memorable? How do you create visuals that communicate powerful messages to your audience? This introductory course covers the basic of contemporary visual thinking in the fields of graphic design and interior design. A combination of lectures and hands-on projects will increase the students awareness of “The How, the Why, and the Process” involved in the creating of different types of communication projects across many mediums.

ARTS1003 Art History I 3 cr.

This course is the first half of the history of art, from prehistoric times through the Middle Ages. The key masterpieces in sculpture, painting, and architecture of the major styles are presented in color slides. Works are studied for their structure, beauty, and meaning. The evolution of each style from society or from the artist’s personality is analyzed. Field trips to the Worcester Art Museum will greatly enhance the students’ learning.

ARTS1004 Art History II 3 cr.

This course is the continuation of a survey of the history of art, from the Renaissance to the present. Masterpieces in art and architecture are presented in color slides. Field trips to the Worcester Art Museum will help the student see that which is explained in the text and in class.

ARTS1100 Principles of Drawing 3 cr.

Principles of Drawing is an introductory studio course that teaches students the basics of drawing. This course will focus on a wide range of drawing exercises using a variety of drawing tools. Students will work in black and white and color, drawing from still life and photographs. They will develop their own sense of composition, and discover the illusion of three dimensions by using shading and perspective.  Students will develop the skills of hands-on observational drawing as well as create constructive concepts that deal with simple volumes in space.

ARTS1201 Drawing Studio: Systems and Techniques 3 cr.

This course provides a survey of the major systems of linear expression. Through group projects in class and homework, students experiment with drawing styles. Each style will be examined through stylistic origin and historic context through research, application and discussion.  The students will be encouraged to explore different styles, focusing on one that appeals to their sensibilities.

ARTS1202 Painting Studio 3 cr.

Through twelve projects in acrylic paints, students will explore their own sense of beauty and visual expression. Some projects concentrate on pure visual structure, some on emotional expression, and some on image making (landscapes, faces, still life). Realism and “drawing ability” are irrelevant, and students can enter the course at any level, from beginner to advanced.

ARTS1301 Principles of Design 3 cr.

Design is the underlying discipline of creating visual expression. The knowledge of how to use design elements (shape, form, balance, rhythm, texture, color and pattern) and an understanding of the proportions which balance them are a means of developing the students’ eyes for design. Emphasis will be focused on developing creative visual problem solving skills and gaining insight for design.

ARTS1401 3D Design 3 cr.

The course focuses on developing the student’s ability to think in terms of space, volume, mass, and three-dimensional form.

ARTS1801 Printmaking 3 cr.

This is an introductory course in which students will learn the basic methods of Monotype and Relief  printmaking.  The course will cover a variety of materials and techniques through demonstration and hands-on time in the studio, including observation of print examples with discussion of assigned readings.  The emphasis is on learning and developing basic techniques which will result in the production of limited edition prints.

ARTS2003 Contemporary Art History: Art and Artists of the Digital Age 3 cr.

This course is a survey of contemporary art and artists.  Beginning with the end of Modernism, this course will investigate the Postmodern concepts that have dominated the art world for the past 50 years.  Artists such as Nam June Paik, Peter Campus, Cindy Sherman, Bruce Nauman, Bill Viola, Chuck Close, Jenny Holzer, William Wegman, the Art Guys and Gretchen Bender are some of the contemporary artists that are using technology like their predecessors used a paintbrush.  This course will not only examine works by these artists but how they incorporate technology with artistic concept and practice.  Prerequiste:  One of the following ARTS1003, ARTS1004 or HUMN1001.

ARTS2100 Drawing II 3 cr. (Game Design students who need to meet this requirement should take GAME3150 Level Design)

This course is a follow-up studio course that continues to solidify and expand the basic drawing concepts that students explored in ARTS1100 Principles of Drawing. The student will be working with wet media techniques (watercolors, oils, markers) as they develop their drawing, and painting techniques in creating 2D objects and more complex subject matter. Students also learn the relationship of plain objects, figures and animals, and their relationship to an environment or composition. Prerequisite: ARTS1100.

ARTS2300 Color Theory 3 cr.

The study of color supports the understanding of all visual media. This studio based course features a hands-on approach to color study as students work with color hues, values, color harmony, and its importance in design and graphic communications. Color theory covers the basic principles of color usage, color harmony, color psychology, and different systems of organization. It is a foundation course for students involved with visual design in color.

ARTS2309 Rendering and Presentation 3 cr.

This course concentrates on the preparation and professional layout of presentation boards using a variety of rendering techniques and color media. Emphasis is on rendering one and two point perspective drawings for use in illustrating interiors, exteriors and furniture designs.

ARTS2400 Cartooning Basics 3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of cartooning.  Students will learn the essential components of cartooning, ranging from initial concept to finished cartoon.  The history of the cartoon will be covered, along with its contemporary application.  Cartoon genres will include caricatures, “Funnies”, single panel (including political cartoons), and Manga/Anime style drawing.  Student will work to develop their own cartoon style while learning to use a variety of media such as pen and ink, marker and watercolor.  Digital techniques, including the use of the computer, will be researched and explored.

ARTS2500 Digital Photography - see GRPH2170 Principles of Digital Imaging (GAME and INDS students who need to meet this requirement should take GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging)

ARTS2800 Life Drawing 3 cr.

The student will enhance their drawing skills by drawing the human figure using live models. Students will study proportion, light and shade, simple anatomy of the human form, and develop a basic understanding of the human figure inaction and in motion.  Prerequisite: ARTS1100; Students with significant drawing experience may apply to the instructor for permission to take this course concurrently with ARTS1100.

ARTS3100 Applied Aesthetics 3 cr.

The philosophical and intellectual investigation of beauty as perceived in the modern age. This course will discuss prints, paintings, sculpture, architecture, utilitarian objects, advertising, photography, film, and computer imagery. Emphasis will be on structure and the connections between different time periods, cultures, and media. Prerequisites: any 1000 level ARTS course.

ARTS4000 Integrated Team Project 3 cr. (Graphic Design students should take GRPH4520 Sr. Team Project)

The Integrated Team Project (ITP) is the first half of a two semester, senior program that concludes with the Capstone Project (ARTS4001). The ITP course involves students working together as teams with local area clients on real-world projects. Student teams will work closely and interact with their assigned client to provide graphic design or interior space planning, web site design, and more. Supervised by design program faculty, the teams will be responsible for the design and production (final production files / boards) of their work which is presented to the client. During the first half of the semester, the ITP course will develop and increase the students’ levels of sophistication in creative problem-solving and client interaction. ITP will push the students to further develop advanced levels of conceptual and creative skills in the development of their projects. Prerequisite: 90 credits of completed design course work.

ARTS4001 Capstone Project 3 cr. (Graphic Design students should take GRPH4530 Professional Practices in Design; Interior Design students should take INDS4001 Capstone Project)

This semester-long, senior-level studio course is the culmination of the student’s Bachelor of Arts in Design experience at Becker College. It is closely associated with the ARTS4000 Integrated Team Project course, taken during the previous semester. Working under the supervision of a faculty member, each student independently selects a thesis project that includes the research, development, creation and execution of a large-volume, high- quality original body of work created within the student’s area of concentration. Final presentation is to a panel of faculty and industry professionals at the conclusion of the semester. The thesis project content and its execution involves the application of previously learned studio skills and their direct relation to actual business applications. It is intended to simulate the workload and dialogue that occurs in a professional practice between designers and clients. Prerequisite: ARTS4000 or 90 credits of completed design course work.

ARTS4100 Design Portfolio 3 cr. (Game Design and Game Programming students should take GAME4610 Portfolio; Graphic Design students should take GRPH4510 Graphic Design Portfolio; Interior Design students should take INDS4610 Interior Design Portfolio)

In this course the student, working with a design faculty member, creates and produces his/her own individual portfolio which highlights the student’s competence, knowledge, and proficiency in his/her individual chosen field or area of interest. In addition, the student will work with Becker College’s Career Services office in the development of his/her job search strategy including creating a PPT presentation of their portfolio, using a portfolio as a marketing tool, preparing resumes and cover letters, developing interviewing skills and professional presentation techniques. Prerequisite: 90 credits of completed design course work.

ARTS4500 Career Intership 3 cr. (Game Design students should take GAME4300 Career Internship; Graphic Design students should takeGRPH4300 Career Internship;Interior Design students should take INDS4900 Interior Design Career Internship)

The senior student is required to pursue an internship with a local professional design firm in which the student can apply his/her academic experience to the professional working environment. The student intern works under the supervision and guidance of a faculty member in partnership with the student business supervisor. Bi-weekly, on-campus meetings between the student and design advisor will assure that the student is fulfilling his/her course and business obligations. A Career Internship form is required and is available at the Registrars’ Office. Prerequisite: 90 credits of completed design course work.

 

B

» BIOL1001 Biology I 4 cr.
» BIOL1002 Biology II 4 cr.
» BIOL1005 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals I 4 cr.
» BIOL1006 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals II 4 cr.
» BIOL1101 Issues in Biology 4 cr.
» BIOL2502 Microbiology 4 cr.
» BIOL2503 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 cr.
» BIOL2504 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 cr.
» BIOL30UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.
» BIOL3001 Cell Biology 3 cr.
» BIOL3100 Developmental Biology (Embryology) 4 cr.
» BIOL3200 Biostatistics 3 cr.
» BIOL3201 Primatology 3 cr.
» BIOL3202 Histology 4 cr.
» BIOL3500 Genetics 3 cr.
» BIOL3520 Genomics 3 cr.
» BIOL4200 Biotechniques 3 cr.
» BIOL4500 Biology Seminar 3 cr.
» BIOL4901 Preceptorship (Internship) 3 cr.
» BIOL4902 Preceptorship Option I (Internship) 6 cr.

BIOL1001 Biology I 4 cr.

Fundamental principles of biology are studied at the molecular and cellular levels.  Topics covered include the chemistry of macromolecules, molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, and the evolutionary process.  Concepts covered in lecture will be applied in a required laboratory section.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Pre-Veterinary concentration.

BIOL1002 Biology II 4 cr.

A course study in levels of organization from tissues to populations.  Particular attention is paid to organ systems and mechanism of action.  The themes of regulation, homeostasis, and diversity thread through the subject matter.  The course will culminate by focusing on the interdependency of life at the most complex level of biological organization – the ecosystem.  Concepts covered in lecture will be applied in a required laboratory section.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Pre-Veterinary concentration.

BIOL1005 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals I 4 cr.

A one-year laboratory course primarily for the Veterinary Technician/Veterinary Science programs. Uses a systems approach to study comparative vertebrate anatomy and physiology. Emphasis is on domestic animals such as the dog, cat, bird, horse, ruminant, rat and mouse. Anatomy is taught primarily in the laboratory and physiology primarily in the classroom. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

BIOL1006 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals II 4 cr.

The continuation of BIOL1005. Prerequisite: BIOL1005 or by permission of the instructor. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

BIOL1101 Issues in Biology 4 cr.

This course for non-majors will cover current topics in Biology and their relevance to everyday life. Topics such as cloning, genetic technology, and stem cell technology will see as useful tools to study such basic concepts as heredity, reproduction, evolution, and biodiversity. Themes such as HIV and AIDS as well as cancer and obesity will address issues such as the structure and function of cells, systems in living organisms and living organisms and the environment. Malnutrition and genetically engineered crops will allow for discussion on energy and living things as well as changes in ecosystems over time. Weekly laboratory sessions will facilitate instruction of the material.

BIOL2502 Microbiology 4 cr.

Microbes as they relate to the health sciences. Lectures emphasize the metabolism, the environment, and the genetics of microorganisms. Also covered is the body’s response to microorganisms, disease, and the body’s defense mechanisms. Required laboratory deals with the physiological, nutritional, and environmental needs of bacteria and fungi and with their use in the identification of microorganisms. Sterilization techniques, the use of the microscope, and the antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria are also studied.  Prerequisite: C or better in CHEM1001/1002 (Veterinary Technology students). A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science and Nursing programs.

BIOL2503 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 cr.

A beginning course in the study of the human body with equal emphasis placed on structure and function. Specimen dissection is an integral requirement for both semesters. The first semester deals with the groundwork of the mammalian body, basic tissue types, fundamental aspects of the cell membrane structure and physiology, integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems.  Lab required.

BIOL2504 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 cr.

A continuation of BIOL2503, examining the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, endocrine and urogenital systems. The lab experience will allow the student to examine appropriate specimens relating to the systems presented in lecture.

BIOL30UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.

BIOL3001 Cell Biology 3 cr.

A course covering the form and function of eukaryotic cells. Issues regarding transport mechanisms, cellular signaling, genetic regulation, and genetic technology are addressed. Attention is given to research design and experimental findings that support the subject matter. Prerequisites: One year of college chemistry and one year of biology or anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. This course assumes a prior knowledge of cell structure, chemical bonds, functional groups and the major biological molecules. Usually offered spring semester. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program. Prerequisites: CHEM3003.

BIOL3100 Developmental Biology (Embryology) 4 cr.

An introduction to vertebrate development, this course is a survey of developing embryos from the fertilized egg through the various stages leading to the adult organism with emphasis on the anatomy of the embryo.  Topics examined in this survey include growth, regulations, inductions, morphogenesis, cell differentiation and underlying molecular mechanisms, regeneration, and aging.  The required laboratory will involve the descriptive and slide studies of development in the sea urchin, frog, bird and mammal.  Prerequisites:  One year of biology with lab or one year of anatomy and physiology with lab.

BIOL3200 Biostatistics 3 cr.

A basic statistic course with an emphasis on the use of statistics in the life sciences. The course covers descriptive statistics, probability and hypothesis testing using both parametric and nonparametric statistics testing. A semester project is required. Prerequisite: MATH1200. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program.

BIOL3201 Primatology 3 cr.

Introduces the order of primates and describes its general characteristics and distribution, reviews the fossil record on primate origins and describes anatomical details and social behaviors. Students will better understand the natural history of primates and thus incorporate the knowledge into the primate’s role in a research facility. Prerequisite: Open to junior Veterinary Science students or by permission of the instructor. A grade of C or better is required for graduation from the Veterinary Science program.

BIOL3202 Histology 4 cr.

This course introduces normal comparative microscopic anatomy. Tissue identification at the microscopic level is emphasized. Tissue preparation, cutting and staining techniques are covered in the laboratory. Prerequisites: One year of anatomy and physiology, or one year of biology, or by permission of the instructor. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program.

BIOL3500 Genetics 3 cr.

A survey course in genetics with an emphasis on vertebrates. The course reinforces past learning of cell division and the structure of chromosomes. Mendelian genetics and modifications to it, molecular basis of heredity, gene expression, heritability and population genetics will also be included. Prerequisites: One year of college biology or anatomy and physiology of domestic animals and CHEM1001/1002. This course assumes a prior knowledge of cell structure, cell division and a fundamental knowledge of DNA structure and function. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science.

BIOL3520 Genomics 3cr.

An introduction to the characterization and analysis of genomes, and an overview of how abnormalities of the human genome can cause or influence certain human diseases.  A survey of the methods used to sequence genomes and identify diversities such as mutations, copy number variations, chromosomal rearrangements, and indels will be covered, as well as the bioinformatics tools used to analyze genomic data.  Additional topics will include comparative genomics, human evolution, and epigenetics.  Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL3500.

BIOL4200 Biotechniques 3 cr.

This course is designed to give the student exposure to laboratory techniques used in biological research as well as techniques commonly employed in diagnostic assays and forensics.  The focus will be on three general areas:  protein/enzyme analysis; immunoassays; and DNA analysis.  Laboratory sessions will provide hands-on experience for the students in all three of these areas.  Lectures will provide a general foundation in each area, the conceptual basis for each technique to be performed in the laboratory, and practical details on implementation.  Prerequisite: CHEM3003.

BIOL4500 Biology Seminar 3 cr.

This capstone course is designed to be flexible in format and content.  Individual students or small groups choose a topic, design and conduct this approved project, and present their results to seminar participants and invited administrators and faculty.  The seminar provides an enhancement to the biology major by broadening the student’s horizon by research, discussions, and readings of topics in biology.  An approach will be taken that will integrate students’ perspectives of current research in biology and allow the students to delve into a selected area of biology.  This approach will further develop research and critical thinking abilities and oral and written communication skills.  Prerequisite:  Senior status and completion of all Biology core courses or permission of professor.

BIOL4901 Internship 3 cr.

The Preceptorship Program is a vocational experience in the area of the student’s biological interest.  The course is designed to provide a hands-on laboratory or research experience that integrates technical skills with academic knowledge in a variety of responsibilities and settings related to the student’s specific concentration.  Under the supervision of a preceptorship coordinator and facility supervisor, the student has the opportunity to individualize his/her internship experience in a certain discipline of biology for personal and professional development.  Requires a minimum of 144 hours preceptorship.  Prerequisite:  Senior status and/or departmental permission.

BIOL4902 Internship II 3 cr.

Requires a minimum of 280 hours preceptorship.

C

» CHEM1001 Chemistry I 4 cr.
» CHEM1002 Chemistry II 4 cr.
» CHEM2100 Organic Chemistry I   4 cr.
» CHEM2101 Organic Chemistry II   4 cr.
» CHEM3003 Biochemistry 3 cr.
» COMM1300 Communication in the 21st Century 3 cr.
» COMM2100 Digital Video Production
» COMM2400 Media for Instruction and Training 3 cr.
» COMM2700 New Media 3 cr.
» COMM3300 Introduction to Web Design
» COMM3305 Advanced Web Design
» COMM3503 Web Design / Multimedia
» COMM4300 Career Internship 3 cr.
» COMM4400 Advanced Topics in Communications 3 cr.
» COMM4510 Communications Portfolio 3 cr.
» COMM4520 Senior Team Project 3 cr.
» COMM4530 Professional Practices in Communication 3 cr.
» CORR2203 Community Corrections
» CORR2209 Probation and Parole
» CPTR1100 Computer Programming I 3 cr.
» CPTR1400 Programming in C++ 3 cr.
» CPTR2300 Data Structures 3 cr. 
» CPTR2400 Database Management 3 cr.
» CPTR2800 Information Security and Information Technology Fundamentals  3 cr.
» CPTR2801 Information Security Threat Landscape and Attacker Motivation  3 cr.
» CPTR2802 Defending and Attacking Modern Networked Computer Systems  3 cr.
» CPTR3400 Data Warehousing 3 cr.
» CPTR3600 Networking I  3 cr.
» CPTR3801 Information Security Incident Handling  3 cr.
» CPTR3802 Business Communication for Information Security Professionals  3 cr.
» CPTR4100 Machine Learning 3 cr.
» CPTR4600 Networking II 3 cr.
» CPTR4801 Emerging Technologies and Implications for Information Security  3 cr.
» CPTR4802 Security Management and Policy Topics  3 cr.

CHEM1001 Chemistry I 4 cr.

An introductory course with laboratory for students in the health professions or life sciences. Inorganic chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry are covered. Topics include measurement, the nature of atoms, bonding, calculations and chemical equations, reactions and solutions, the states of matter, thermodynamics, kinetics, acids, bases, buffers and the hydrocarbons. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology program.

CHEM1002 Chemistry II 4 cr.

A continuation of CHEM1001. The basics of organic chemistry are continued. The fundamentals of biochemistry are covered and its application to the health sciences is emphasized. Some topics include functional groups, nomenclature and reactions of organic compounds, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and basic metabolism.  Lab required.  Prerequisite: A grade of D or better in CHEM1001. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology program.

CHEM2100 Organic Chemistry I   4 cr.

This course introduces Organic Chemistry, with emphasis on the principles of broad classes of reactions. Topics will include bonding, physical properties, stereochemistry of alkanes, alkenes. alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers, with an introduction to infrared and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The laboratory will complement and expand on lecture topics. Laboratory safety will be emphasized. The organic reactions performed will be done in a microscale. Prerequisites CHEM1001 and CHEM1002. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Sciences Programs.

CHEM2101 Organic Chemistry II   4 cr.

This course is a continuation of CHEM2100 and involves the chemistry of carboryl groups and aromatic compounds. Emphasis will be placed more heavily on analysis and synthesis, as well as the relevancy to medicine, the environment, biology and society in general. The laboratory will again enhance and expand the lecture topics. Prerequisites: CHEM2100. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science Programs.

CHEM3003 Biochemistry 3 cr.

This course is designed as a general survey class in Biochemistry. The structures, functions, anabolic and catabolic pathways of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids will be discussed. Enzymatic regulation, nervous and endocrine control, and pathway integration will be evaluated in the context of homeostasis at the cellular through organismal level. Prerequisites: Biology I & II or Anatomy and Physiology I & II and Chemistry I & II. Usually offered in Fall. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Sciences program.

COMM1300 Communication in the 21st Century 3 cr.

The media and communication field is a constantly changing industry encompassing traditional media communications, digital communications, social networking, advertising, news and so much more. Almost every aspect of our daily lives is impacted in some way by communications. This survey course takes a look at various types of communications, the impact of communications and the future of media. Students will discuss how media impacts our culture, ethics, society, government and politics in the global environment.  Prerequisites: none.

COMM2100 Digital Video Production 3 cr.

Introduction to Video Production is open to any student interested in the field of videography, new media, communications, visual arts, public relations, marketing, advertising, theatre or technical production. The course is designed to introduce the interested student to the basis of digital video production and post-production in the media, while stressing video composition methods, and the basic techniques of videography.

The student will learn how to shoot and deliver compelling visual stories using a variety of capturing devices such as smart phones and camcorders, as well as post-production/editing software.  Students will work individually or as part of a team to produce short video projects while exploring a variety of delivery methods, including web, mobile, and emerging new media.  The course will also cover the History of Film & Television, Scriptwriting, and the use of new Digital Media in the creation of videos.  The class featuring hands-on, real world projects will require the students to be creative, responsible and professional. Prerequisites: none.

COMM2400 Media for Instruction and Training 3 cr.

The fields of instructional material design and instructional technology have been merging for the better part of two decades, even longer by some accounts.  This course will provide students with a review of the past, the present, and the future history of the fast-paced field of instructional design. In addition students will combine technology skills with learning theory needed for material design and development by using the ADDIE model of development. Through hands-on use of a variety of computer-based tools dealing with instructional methods and principles of design, students will analyze and apply strategies and learning theories for the identification of instructional needs, communication skills, and models to meet educational and training goals. Prerequisites: none.

COMM2700 New Media 3 cr.

This course will introduce students to all major facets of new media including news, social media, television, sports casting, magazine-style broadcasts and sites, reality TV, internet broadcasts, media sites and more. Through lectures, discussion, professional guests and field work the course will cover the evolution of media, content collection and creation plus distribution. Students will learn about gathering, writing, and copy editing for various media outlets including television, radio, Internet and newspaper.  Prerequisites: ENGL1001 and 1003.

COMM3300 Introduction to Web Design – see GRPH2160 Introduction to Web Design

COMM3305 Advanced Web Design – see GRPH3110 Advanced Web Design

COMM3503 Web Design / Multimedia – see GRPH2180 Animation and Motion Graphics

COMM4300 Career Internship 3 cr.

The junior or senior student is required to pursue an internship with a local company or organization in which the student can apply his/her academic experience to the professional working environment. The student intern works under the supervision and guidance of a faculty member in partnership with the student business supervisor. Bi-weekly, on-campus meetings between the student and design advisor will assure that the student is fulfilling his/her course and business obligations. A Career Internship form is required and is available in Career Services to be filled out for approval.  Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Communications Design.

COMM4400 Advanced Topics in Communications 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at http://www.becker.edu/academics/course-descriptions/special-topics-courses.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.

COMM4510 Communications Portfolio 3 cr.

In this course the student, working with a design faculty member, creates and produces his/her own individual portfolio which highlights the student‘s competence, knowledge, and proficiency in his/her individual chosen field or area of interest. In addition, the student will work with Becker College‘s Career Services office in the development of his/her job search strategy including creating a PPT presentation of their portfolio, using a portfolio as a marketing tool, preparing resumes and cover letters, developing interviewing skills and professional presentation techniques. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Communications Design.

COMM4520 Senior Team Project 3 cr.

The Senior Team Project involves communications design students working as teams with local area clients on real world projects.  They may also be working with graphic design students.  You and your team will work closely and interact with your assigned client to provide the communications design services required by your client. Supervised by a faculty member from the design area, the teams will be responsible for setting meeting times with their clients, determining their needs, drafting a proposal with a scope of work and producing the deliverables described in the proposal to clients by the end of the semester. The course will develop and increase the student level of sophistication in creative problem-solving and client interaction and challenge the student to further develop an advanced level of conceptual and creative skills in the creation and production of their projects. Prerequisite: Junior Status in Communications Design.

COMM4530 Professional Practices in Communication 3 cr.

An exploration of communications design and the industries business environment.  This course will provide advanced projects for designing for and within the corporate sector.  Students will learn to create project plans, coordinate the activities of various project components, fill out copyright forms, and compile contracts. The class emphasizes skills necessary for working with communication firms or in the communications department of a broader industry.  Students will also prepare self-promotional materials, portfolio presentations and sales pitches to further prepare them for their professional careers.  Prerequisite: Junior status in Communications Design.

CORR2203 Community Corrections – see JUST2203 Corrections, Systems & Process

CORR2209 Probation and Parole – see JUST2209 Probation and Parole

CPTR1100 Computer Programming I 3 cr. (previously INFO1100 Introduction to Programming)

Introduction to Programming, this course introduces principles of programming in an object oriented environment.   Topics include design and implementation of programs that use a variety of data structures, functions, and conditionals.  Students will be expected to design, implement, and debug programs. Prerequisites:  None.

CPTR1400 Programming in C++ 3 cr. (previously INFO1400 Programming in C++)

Fundamental programming concepts for use in business and software development. Both translator and compiled C will be covered. Logic, flowcharting, pseudocode, verification and documentation of programs.

CPTR2300 Data Structures 3 cr. (previously INFO2300 Data Structures)

Manipulation of character strings and data (searching, sorting, etc.) file processing, program segmentation, linearly linked lists, matrices, trees and graphics, stack and queues will be covered using the language of C++. Prerequisite: INFO1400.

CPTR2400 Database Management 3 cr.

Discusses the basics of database management, a critical element of all IT organizations.  Databases are the foundation for operational/transaction systems and for management decision-making. Topics include types of databases and the database environment, database analysis and data modeling, database design with relational models (SQL and QBE), implementation issues including, data administration, data integrity, concurrent updates, and data security. This course includes introduction to distributed databases, data warehouses, stored procedures, triggers, data macros, and web databases.  Prerequisite: CPTR1100.

CPTR2800 Information Security and Information Technology Fundamentals  3 cr.

This course will serve as an introduction to concepts and terms related to information technology as well as fundamental information technology principles key to the understanding and practice of information security. This will give the student a clear overview of the core elements of the Information Security business and much of the technology involved.

CPTR2801 Information Security Threat Landscape and Attacker Motivation  3 cr.

This course will cover the types of attacks and threats which represent risk to information confidentiality, integrity and availability. Understanding the motivations and options available to attackers is of core importance to defensive concepts and communications about information security initiatives, gaps, and capabilities at the local, state and international level. Attacks may be from malicious amateur groups or individuals, organized crime syndicates or state level cyber intelligence agency looking to gather critical information or cripple key data infrastructures   Prerequisite course:  CPTR2800.

CPTR2802 Defending and Attacking Modern Networked Computer Systems  3 cr.

This course will introduce the technical and procedural components of an information security program that will assist in the mitigation of risks to information security. Students will learn hands on techniques to apply technical controls to address vulnerabilities. Learning to think like an attacker and knowing the tools and techniques of attackers is pivotal to designing and configuring IT security systems. Hands on experience will be gained in these tools and techniques that will enable the students to create countermeasures against hacking attacks. Prerequisite:  CPTR2800 and CPTR2801.

REQUIREMENT – This course requires access to a Windows 7 or higher or Linux computer system with access to the internet.

Disclaimer – The techniques and tools described and demonstrated in this course should only be used with the explicit permission of the owners of information systems and within the context of the lab exercises provided only. These tools and techniques could represent violations of local, state, and Federal law as well as terms of service of network providers and employers.

CPTR3400 Data Warehousing 3 cr.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of data warehousing together with an in-depth treatment of planning, design, deployment, and ongoing maintenance issues. Students will gain a clear understanding of techniques for data extraction from source systems, data cleansing, data transformations, data warehouse architecture and infrastructure, and information delivery. Once the basic data warehouse principles and concepts have been established, the remainder of the class will be built around a group project where students build a functioning prototype of a data warehouse.   Prerequisite:  CPTR2400.

CPTR3600 Networking I 3 cr. (previously INFO3600 Networking I)

Introduces the student to the basic concepts of networking and such topics as Networking Architecture, rings, token rings, Ethernet, ATM, LANs, WANs, and MANs, transmission systems, POTS, co-ax, Cat-5, fiberglass, wireless, modems, multiplex, Internet structure and history. In addition, this course will prepare the student to install, configure, and administer the network operating system currently in use in most business office networks.

CPTR3801 Information Security Incident Handling  3 cr.

Information security incidents are a nearly inevitable part of the practice of information security.  Dealing with these incidents in repeatable predicable manners with a goal of reducing the overall frequency and impact of security incidents is a key function of the information security role in an organization. During this course, the students will explore and demonstrate understanding of the following concepts. Prerequisite:  CPTR2802.

CPTR3802 Business Communication for Information Security Professionals  3 cr.

Communications is the single most important skill of any professional in the information security field. The success or failure of Infosec projects and programs is entirely dependent on the ability of those involved to relate the importance of the program to business leaders in business terms and demonstrate successful execution based on business goals. This course assessment will include actual writing assignments in the format of executive presentation about a topic in security. Recommend students independently research a recent system or vulnerability and using templates and provided materials make a report on this topic targeted at senior management as an awareness case with a proposed mitigating control or system. Prerequisite: CPTR3801.

CPTR4100 Machine Learning 3 cr.

The field of machine learning is concerned with the question of how to construct computer programs that improve automatically with experience.  In recent years, many successful applications of machine learning have been developed, ranging from data-mining programs that learn to detect fraudulent credit card transactions, to autonomous vehicles that learn to drive on public highways.  At the same time, there have been important advances in the theory and algorithms that form the foundation of this field. Theoretical properties of these algorithms and their practical applications will be covered.  Machine learning algorithms to be studied include decision trees, artificial neural networks, Bayesian learners, evolutionary algorithm, boosting and bagging techniques, computational learning theory, and PAC learnablity. The course will also introduce students to Map Reduce algorithms for pattern discovery in massive unstructured data.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of CPTR1100 or CPTR1400, and MATH2200, MATH2202, and MATH3305.

CPTR4600 Networking II 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of CPTR3600 and will present practical applications of software installation and network administration in a laboratory environment. Problem solving skills will be emphasized along with actual troubleshooting scenarios and students will be required to solve problems introduced on lab networks in order to strengthen their understanding of fundamental concepts, requirements and design tradeoffs, particularly as related to scheduling, congestion control, routing, wireless access and mobility, and applications.  Students will be encouraged to study for certification exams. Prerequisite: CPTR3600.

CPTR4801 Emerging Technologies and Implications for Information Security  3 cr.

Information security and IT in general is always changing and is often driven by consumer technologies outside of the corporate enterprise. Students in this course will be exposed to some of the new technology drivers impacting Infosec at this time and some of the near term challenges that will be faced by IT and Infosec departments in the years to come. Prerequisites: CPTR3801 and CPTR3802.

CPTR4802 Security Management and Policy Topics  3 cr.

Management of information security in a modern organization generally requires an established framework for day-to-day operations and continual improvement. Regulatory requirements dictate controls and audit guidelines in various industries. Students in this course will gain familiarity with these frameworks, requirements and concepts and demonstrate their understanding through course assignments. Prerequisite: CPTR4801.

E

» ECON2001 Microeconomics 3 cr.
» ECON2002 Macroeconomics 3 cr.
» EDUC1001 Behavior and the Young Child 3 cr.
» EDUC1003 Principles of Education 4 cr.
» EDUC1004 Experiences in ECE Curriculum 4 cr.
» EDUC1201 Arts in Education 3 cr.
» EDUC1205 Elementary Math Subtest MTEGL Genceral Curriculum Concepts 1 cr.
» EDUC2004 Administrating and Evaluating Programs Serving Children and Youth 3 cr.
» EDUC2203 Diverse Learner in the Classroom 3 cr.
» EDUC2207  Health and Safety of Young Children 3 cr.
» EDUC2405 Observing, Documenting and Assessing Young Children 3 cr.
» EDUC2500 Practicum in Early Childhood Education 6 cr.
» EDUC2700 Teaching English Language Learners 3 cr.
» EDUC2901 Infant/Toddler Internship 3 cr.
» EDUC3000 Foundations in American Education 3 cr.
» EDUC3100 Reading, Writing and Language in ECE 4 cr.
» EDUC3101 Foundations of Literacy 3 cr.
» EDUC3102 Literacy: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School 4 cr.
» EDUC3105 Introduction to the Teaching Profession 3 cr.
» EDUC3203  Mathematics and Science for Young Children  3 cr.
» EDUC3300 Science and Social Studies: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School 4 cr.
» EDUC3301 Science and Social Studies:  Curriculum and Instruction in the Early Childhood School 4 cr.
» EDUC3305 Mathematics: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School 4 cr.
» EDUC3306 Mathematics:  Curriculum and Instruction in the Early Childhood School 4 cr.
» EDUC3500 Practicum II 6 cr.
» EDUC4001 Advanced Practicum in ECE 9 cr.
» EDUC4002 ECE Seminar 3 cr.
» EDUC4100 Early Childhood Capstone 3 cr.
» EDUC4201 Elementary Education Practicum 9 cr.
» EDUC4202 Elementary Education Seminar 3 cr.
» ENFO1101 Homeland, Private & Public Security
» ENFO2207 Police and the Community
» ENFO3001 Police Administration and Management
» ENFO3200 Criminal Procedure and Evidence
» ENGF1000 Foundations of Writing 6 cr.
» ENGF1001 Foundations of Writing 3 cr.
» ENGL1001 English Composition I 3 cr.
» ENGL1003 Writing about Literature 3 cr.
» ENGL1006 Children’s Literature 3 cr.
» ENGL1008 Thinking, Writing and Learning 6 credits; 10 weeks
» ENGL1500 Effective Communications 3 cr.
» ENGL2003 Public Speaking 3 cr.
» ENGL2102 Advanced Composition 3 cr.
» ENGL2200 American Literature I 3 cr.
» ENGL2201 American Literature II 3 cr.
» ENGL2202 Introduction to Drama 3 cr.
» ENGL2302 Short Story 3 cr.
» ENGL2405 Leadership and Literature 3 cr.
» ENGL2500 Mythology 3 cr.
» ENGL2600 Literature By Women 3 cr.
» ENGL2604 Screenwriting Basics I 3 cr.
» ENGL2605 Screenwriting Basics II 3 cr.
» ENGL2700 English Literature I 3 cr.
» ENGL2701 English Literature II 3 cr.
» ENGL3001 American Literature I 3 cr.
» ENGL3002 American Literature II 3 cr.
» ENGL3003 English Literature I 3 cr.
» ENGL3004 English Literature II 3 cr.
» ENGL3006 Coming of Age in World Fiction and Film 3 cr.
» ENGL3008 War in Literature and Film  3 cr.
» ENGL3100 Obsession and Violence in Shakespearean Drama and Film 3 cr.
» ENGL3205 Creative Writing 3 cr.
» ENGL3206 Creative Nonfiction:  Telling True Stories 3 cr.
» ENGL3509 World Literature 3 cr.
» ENGL3604 Writing for Digital Media 3 cr.
» ENGL3605 Writing for Animation 3 cr.
» ENGL3704 Contemporary American Poetry 3 cr.
» ENGL3705 African-American Poetry from 1945 3 cr.
» ENGL3801 American Short Story 3 cr.
» ENGL3802 African-American Novel 3 cr.
» ENVS1001 Environmental Science I 4 cr.
» ENVS1001A Environmental Science I 3 cr.
» ENVS1002 Environmental Science II 4 cr.
» ENVS1002A Environmental Science II 3 cr.
» EQST1001 Foundations in Riding I 3 cr.
» EQST1002 Foundations in Riding II 3 cr.
» EQST1601 Foundation in Equine Care 3 cr.
» EQST2001 Principles of Riding Instruction I 3 cr.
» EQST2002 Principles of Riding Instruction II 3 cr.
» EQST2200 Equine Industry and the Law 3 cr.
» EQST2801 Fundamentals of Farm and Stable Management 3 cr.
» EQST3001 Principles of Riding Instruction III 4 cr.
» EQST3100 Equine Behavior 3 cr.
» EQST3104 Special Topics in the Equine Industry 3 cr.
» EQST3200 Basic Training Methods 3 cr.
» EQST3300 Feeds and Forages 3 cr.
» EQST3701 Equine Biomechanics and Conformation 3 cr.
» EQST4200 Training Under Saddle 4 cr.
» EQST4201 Equine Pathology and Diseases 3 cr.
» EQST4500 Equine Facilities Management 3 cr.
» EQST4906 Externship Module Ia - 3 cr.
» EQST4908 Externship Module Ib - 3 cr.
» EXSC1000 Sports and Exercise Skills Instruction
» EXSC1001 Strength and Conditioning Skills
» EXSC1002 Pedagogy
» EXSC1003 Gymnastics
» EXSC1004 Field Hockey
» EXSC1005 Soccer
» EXSC1006 Volleyball
» EXSC1008 Aerobics
» EXSC1009 Project Adventure
» EXSC1101 Archery
» EXSC1102 Badminton
» EXSC1103 Bowling
» EXSC1105 Sport Skills Instruction
» EXSC1106 Tennis
» EXSC1107 Yoga
» EXSC1108 Social Dance
» EXSC1205 Health and Fitness Skills 3 cr.
» EXSC1500 Stress Management 3 cr.
» EXSC2105 Teaching Sports Skills 3 cr.
» EXSC2202 Emergency Responder 3 cr.
» EXSC2203 Personal and Community Health 3 cr.
» EXSC2204 Fitness for Life 3 cr.
» EXSC2205 Structural Kinesiology 3 cr.
» EXSC2705 Advanced Personal Trainer 4 cr.
» EXSC3005 Biomechanics in Sports 4 cr.
» EXSC3105 Nutrition 3 cr.
» EXSC3201 Consumer Health 3 cr.
» EXSC3205 Drugs and Society 3 cr.
» EXSC3300 Exercise Physiology 4 cr.
» EXSC3500 Human Sexuality 3 cr.
» EXSC4105 Principles of Strength and Conditioning 3 cr.
» EXSC4205 Lifespan Motor Development and Learning 3 cr.
» EXSC4800 Assessment & Prescription in Health & Fitness 4 cr.
» EXSC4908 Internship in Health/Fitness 6 cr.

ECON2001 Microeconomics 3 cr.

This course will focus on the organization and functions of the American economic system of capitalism, including a description and analysis of major economic institutions such as the “free market” and the development of the ability to apply economic analysis to the study of consumption, production, demand, supply, price determination, and costs. In addition to the workings of and outcomes in traditional product markets for goods and services (like food, clothing, housing, and educational services, there will be a special focus on the labor market, financial markets, and the health care market. Prerequisite:  MATH1200.

ECON2002 Macroeconomics 3 cr.

Utilizing microeconomic principles as its foundations, macroeconomics is concerned with the modern concept of aggregate economic productivity and output, national income analysis, inflation, national levels of employment and unemployment, and the government taxing, spending, and monetary policies designed to affect these aggregates while maintaining balanced economic progress. The nature of the market for money, the role of the commercial banking industry, and how and why central banks manage the money supply will be one area of focused study. Another will be the impact of international trade, trade policies, and the market for foreign exchange. The globalization of finance, risk management, and central bank coordination and cooperation will also be studied.

EDUC1001 Behavior and the Young Child 3 cr.

This course will explore normal and abnormal behavior and helping to change negative behavior to positive. It covers setting tones for behavior within the classroom structure, methods and recreations and working with parents to help them modify their child’s behavior. Focus: infancy to grade two.

EDUC1003 Principles of Education 4 cr.

This course builds a foundation of knowledge to help the prospective teacher in working with the child and the family. Goals of this course include learning to observe children, analyzing the NAEYC Code of Ethics, learning ways of appropriately guiding children, and developing an understanding of the nature of play. This course requires a 20-hour field-experience in a preschool classroom.

EDUC1004 Experiences in ECE Curriculum 4 cr.

This course will provide a foundation for early childhood concentration students in the curricular areas of Math, Science, Social Studies, and Language Arts. Students will learn how to develop materials to teach these curricula areas while implementing the Massachusetts Preschool Guidelines and Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Lesson plan writing is also a major focus of this course. A 20-hour prepracticum provides field experience in preparing and executing activities discussed in class.

EDUC1201 Arts in Education 3 cr.

This course has been designed to encompass the fields of movement, music, and visual arts. Students will study Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences and integrate this knowledge with the MA Arts Curriculum Framework in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of teaching the arts to children. Principles of planning well-balanced art, music, and movement, and physical education curriculum based on developmental levels from pre-K to 6 will be addressed. Imaginative, reflective and analytical thinking along with heightened perceptual awareness and respect for creativity in others will be stressed.

EDUC1205 Elementary Math Subtest MTEL General Curriculum Concepts 1 cr.

This is a 15 hour course that will cover the topics on the Elementary Math Subtest Massachusetts MTEL General Curriculum with emphasis on improving problem-solving skills and developing the deep conceptual understanding that is the key to success. Students will review or learn the most efficient ways to solve various types of problems.

EDUC2004 Administrating and Evaluating Programs Serving Children and Youth (previously ECE Management and Administration) 3 cr.

This course is intended for future professionals who want to be directors of childcare centers. The goals of this course are to learn the skills needed to start and operate an early childhood center, understand the role of the early childhood director, identify skills needed to handle financial matters and demonstrate ways to effectively communicate with parents.

EDUC2203 Diverse Learner in the Classroom (previously Special Needs in the Classroom) 3 cr.

This course will provide students with fundamental background knowledge in the field of special education as well as current research on how students with various learning needs are served within inclusive school environments. Students will study the major physical, psychological, learning, and behavioral characteristics of children with special needs and the implications of these characteristics for effective instruction at the early childhood (PK-2) and elementary (1-6) levels. Prerequisite: PSYC1002 or PSYC1107.

EDUC2207  Health and Safety of Young Children 3 cr.

The nurturing of a child’s development is based on knowledge of the child’s general health, growth and development, learning style and unique characteristics. This course will address ways to promote healthy relationships with families and caregivers; to understand cultural differences; to be sensitive to stressors in the home environment; to help develop healthy eating and physical habits, and to explore physical and mental health problems in children. This course will focus on children ages 0 to 8 years.

EDUC2405 Observing, Documenting and Assessing Young Children 3 cr.

Assessment is an integral part of the total picture of early childhood and youth education.  Information gathered through informed observation and other ways guides the countless decisions at the heart of solid and appropriate instruction and intervention.  Systematic and intensive assessment information collection informs instruction and promotes children’s learning.  Students will gain knowledge of both formal and authentic assessment techniques helping them to become competent teachers.  Prerequisite: PSYC1002.

EDUC2500 Practicum in Early Childhood Education 6 cr.

Three months (EEC) supervised field experience in a PK-K setting with a licensed teacher. The practicum qualifies the student to be a preschool level teacher (ages 2.9 to 4.9). It also satisfies a portion of the DOE practicum requirements for Mass. State Education Licensure. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. May only be repeated once. Prerequisites: 2.0 C. GPA, 2.7 GPA in all education courses.  A grade of B or better is required for entry into the B.A. Psychology (ECE concentration) program.

EDUC2700 Teaching English Language Learners 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to prepare college students in elementary education preparatory programs with the knowledge and professional practice skills and strategies necessary to provide effective, comprehensible, accessible and differentiated sheltered content instruction to English Language Learners in their classroom. Students will increase their knowledge of the ELL population, including cultural and social considerations, second language acquisition theory (SLA), language and literacy theories, and current best practices in ELL instruction. They will also be introduced to the various educational reforms, such as the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment’s (WIDA’s) and the English Language Development (ELD) standards.  Prerequisite: ENGL1003.

EDUC2901 Infant/Toddler Internship 3 cr.

Students work in an infant/toddler setting (EEC approved) for three months. Weekly seminars on all aspects of teaching infants and toddlers. Prerequisites: 2.00 GPA and permission of the instructor.

EDUC3000 Foundations in American Education 3 cr.

This course is intended to provide background knowledge in the social, philosophical, and historical foundations of education. The course will consider the social origins of educational ideals, significant historical contributions to educational philosophy, and various contemporary social concerns in American education.

EDUC3100 Reading, Writing and Language in ECE 4 cr.

This course examines children’s language acquisition and emerging literacy from a developmental perspective. Various methods of teaching reading and writing will be explored. Major emphasis is place on awareness and application of the standards for instruction and assessment as outlined in the English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks. Includes a 40-hour prepracticum experience in a K-2 classroom. This course is open only to students who have achieved a passing grade in the Communication and Literacy Skills MTEL.  A grade of B or better is required prior to student teaching (EDUC4001/4002).

EDUC3101 Foundations of Literacy 3 cr.

This course will provide a foundation for ECE students and Elementary Education concentration students in curriculum and instruction in reading and writing in grades K-6. It will focus on the learning objectives contained in the State of Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL) in Reading. It will prepare students for this exam and for the required pre-practicum courses in the ECE program (EDUC3100) and the Elementary Education concentration program (EDUC3102). Theory, instructional methodology, diagnostic and assessment techniques for literacy instruction will be presented.  This course is open only to students who have achieved a passing grade in the Communication and Literacy Skills MTEL.

EDUC3102 Literacy: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School 4 cr.

In this course, the study of literacy is approached from a developmental perspective, beginning with emergent literacy and progressing through the more advanced stages of reading and writing to learn in the upper elementary grades. The focus of this course will be upon theories, instructional methodology, and current approaches and materials for literacy instruction in grades 1-6. Major emphasis is placed on awareness and application of the standards for instruction and assessment outlined in the English Language Arts Curriculum Framework. Note: There is a 40-hour prepracticum experience attached to this course.  This course is open only to students who have achieved a passing grade in the Communication and Literacy Skills MTEL.  A grade of B or better is required before enrolling in EDUC4201 & EDUC4202.

EDUC3105 Introduction to the Teaching Profession 3 cr.

This course is designed to help provide students, prospective teachers; the means to analyze, develop, and facilitate their own as well as their future students’ communicate behaviors, including team and group dynamics. The course is also designed to enhance communication skills both in oral and written form which includes professional presentation skills for effective classroom lectures.

EDUC3203  Mathematics and Science for Young Children  3 cr.

Students will be presented with an organized, sequential approach to creating a developmentally appropriate math and science curriculum for children ages 0 to 8.  Students will apply best practices in teaching methods and about high quality materials available for classroom use. Embedded in the course will be the fundamental STEM concepts underling a young child’s understanding of math, science, technology and engineering. For example, math concepts such as comparing, classifying, and measuring are simply called process skills when applied to science and engineering problems. The other science process skills (observing, communicating, inferring, hypothesizing) are equally important for solving problems in engineering, science, and mathematics.   Students will learn to analyze the learning environment and develop high quality, engaging, and developmentally appropriate learning. This course is different from EDUC3306 Mathematics: Curriculum and Instruction in the Early Childhood School in that it includes science and addresses children ages 0 to 3. The focus is the Early Childhood Core Competencies and not the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks .  Prerequisites: PSYC1002 and MATH1200.

EDUC3300 Science and Social Studies: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School 4 cr.

This course will focus on the following areas in teaching elementary science and social studies: state and national standards; teaching science by inquiry, teaching for the process and content of science; science and technology; project-based methodology; lesson planning and development; interdisciplinary themes for learning; the social science disciplines; varied teaching methods to approach social studies and geography; and how these content areas relate to literacy. Note: There is a 20-hour prepracticum experience attached to this course. This course is open only to students who have achieved a passing grade in the Communication and Literacy Skills MTEL.  A grade of B or better is required before enrolling in EDUC4001/4002.

EDUC3301 Science and Social Studies:  Curriculum and Instruction in the Early Childhood School 4 cr.

Students focus on how young children gain an understanding of the principles of science through exploring the world around them in terms of the life, earth, physical, and technological sciences.  The course models a constructivist approach with an emphasis on problem-solving, real-life connections, and the discovery method.  Essential science content is reviewed to ensure students’ understanding of key concepts.  In the area of social sciences, the course provides an opportunity for these potential teachers of young children to reflect upon the social goals of education within a democracy, to reinforce knowledge of U.S. and world history and geography, and to understand basic principles of multiculturalism and a global economy.

In conjunction with the lecture portion of the course on campus, students will complete a pre-practicum experience in a local elementary classroom where they will apply the course curriculum.  Students will observe classroom teachers and then teach lessons in science and social studies to both small and whole class groups.  This pre-practicum experience will consist of a total of forty hours completed across the semester in minimum of one-hour blocks of time, beginning after the first class.  This experience will be supervised by both the classroom-cooperating teacher and the professor.  This course is open only to students who have achieved a passing grade in the Communication and Literacy Skills MTEL.

EDUC3305 Mathematics: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School 4 cr.

This is a required course for students working towards elementary teacher certification. It is designed according to national and state standards regarding mathematics instruction. Students will study theories of learning mathematics from a developmental perspective. They will practice preparing instructional activities and assessment techniques to meet the needs of diverse learners. Curriculum integration, problem solving and real-life applications for teaching math will be stressed. Note: There is a 40-hour prepracticum experience attached to this course.  This course is open only to students who have achieved a passing grade in the Communication and Literacy Skills MTEL.  A grade of B or better is required before enrolling in EDUC4001/4002.

EDUC3306 Mathematics:  Curriculum and Instruction in the Early Childhood School 4 cr.

The purpose of this course is for students to learn how young children gain understanding of concepts and skills in mathematics.  Students learn and apply best practices in teaching methods and about high quality materials available for classroom use.  The course emphasizes problem solving, algorithms/computation, real-life connections, and hands-on methodology.  The Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics (November, 2000; Supplement, May 2004) provides a structure for the focus of the Pre-K-Grade 2 curriculum presented in the course. Students are expected to review the content and skills required in the math curriculum frameworks to solidify and fine-tune their own understanding of the key areas addressed by the standards.  Time is allotted for reviewing MCAS, editions previously administered, in order for students to understand how elementary pupils math knowledge and skills are evaluated under current state and national statutes.

In conjunction with the lecture portion of the course on campus, students complete a pre-practicum experience in a local elementary classroom where they apply the course curriculum.  Students observe classroom teachers and then teach lessons in mathematics to both small and whole class groups.  This pre-practicum experience consists of a total of forty hours completed across the semester in minimum of one-hour blocks of time, beginning after the first class.  This experience is supervised by both the classroom-cooperating teacher and the professor.  This course is open only to students who have achieved a passing grade in the Communication and Literacy Skills MTEL.

EDUC3500 Practicum II 6 cr.

This course requires students to complete a 300 hour practicum experience under the supervision of a Department of Early Education and Care licensed pre-school teacher. Students may choose a setting with children between the ages of birth to eight. Throughout the practicum students will develop leadership in their early education and care setting, use a problem solving approach in the application of theory to real life practice, collect and analyze data to inform practice, and reflect on their practicum placement. This practicum includes a one hour a week seminar with a college supervisor.   Students are required to complete the practicum with a different age group than EDUC2500.  Pre-requisite EDUC2500.

EDUC4001 Advanced Practicum in ECE 9 cr. 

A 300-hour supervised K-2 classroom field placement in student teaching fulfills the second part of the Massachusetts Department of Education practicum requirement for ECE teacher certification. This is contingent upon the student having successfully completed an approved practicum at the pre-K level. Course includes on-site supervision and meetings with Supervising Practitioners (mentors) and college supervisors. The practicum includes: on-site supervision; planning, implementing and assessing activities with children; individualizing for IEPs, special needs and planning for diversity at developmentally appropriate levels. Seminar will be taken concurrently with EDUC4002 and will complement the practicum. Prerequisites: Final grade of B or better in EDUC3306 and EDUC3100; and a passing score is required on the Massachusetts Tests of Educator Licensure (MTEL): Foundations of Reading subtest to enroll in EDUC4001/4002.

EDUC4002 ECE Seminar 3 cr.

Students in this seminar, taken concurrently with the Senior Practicum, discuss current issues in early childhood education, reflect on and evaluate their growth in the professional teaching standards, and develop a showcase teaching portfolio integrating the Professional Standards for Teachers, philosophy of education, lesson plans and units, and self-assessments. Resume writing and interview skills are also presented. Seminar will be taken concurrently with EDUC4001 and will complement the practicum. Prerequisites: Final grade of B or better in EDUC3306 and EDUC3100; final grade of C or better in PSYC2806, and a passing score is required on the Massachusetts Tests of Educator Licensure (MTEL): Foundations of Reading subtest to enroll in EDUC4001/4002.

EDUC4100 Early Childhood Capstone 3 cr.

Students will be required to engage in independent research and prepare a presentation of their findings. Students will also complete a career portfolio. The portfolio will include:

  • Philosophy of education: Student will clearly state thoughts, values, and beliefs that contribute to educational decisions.
  • Self- Evaluation: Student will reflect critically on all Core Competencies and STEM using many examples and evidence to document how they are met
  • Journal Reflections: Student will demonstrate introspection and self- assessment
  • Professional Goals: Student will critically reflect on further professional development

Prerequisites: EDUC3500 and PSYC4005.

EDUC4201 Elementary Education Practicum 9 cr.

The 300-hour supervised classroom field placement in student teaching fulfills the second part of the Massachusetts Department of Education requirement for a practicum at the grade 1 through grade 6 level. The practicum includes: on-site supervision; planning, implementing and assessing activities with children; individualizing for IEPs, special needs and planning for diversity at developmentally appropriate levels. Seminar will be taken concurrently and will reflect academic work pertinent to the elementary teacher. Prerequisites: Grade of B (3.0) or higher is required in EDUC3102, EDUC3300, EDUC3305; and a passing score is required on the Massachusetts Tests of Educator Licensure (MTEL): Communication and Literacy to enroll in EDUC4201/4202.

EDUC4202 Elementary Education Seminar 3 cr.

Students in this seminar, taken concurrently with the Senior Practicum, discuss current issues in elementary education, reflect on and evaluate their growth in the professional teaching standards, and develop a showcase teaching portfolio integrating the Professional Standards for Teachers, philosophy of education, lesson plans and units, and self-assessments. Resume writing and interview skills are also presented.

ENFO1101 Homeland, Private & Public Security – see JUST1101 Homeland, Private & Public Security

ENFO2207 Police and the Community – see JUST2207 Police and the Community

ENFO3001 Police Administration and Management – see JUST3001 Police Administration and Management

ENFO3200 Criminal Procedure and Evidence – see JUST3200 Criminal Procedure and Evidence

ENGF1000 Foundations of Writing 6 cr. (non-graduation credit)

This intensive developmental writing/reading course prepares the student for college level writing.  Basic elements include all of those found in ENGF1001 at a starting point appropriate for the level of student placing into this course.

ENGF1001 Foundations of Writing 3 cr. (non-graduation credit)

This developmental writing/reading course focuses on structure, organization, development, and correctness of the college-level essay. Emphasis is threefold; generation and organization of ideas of sufficient depth to meet college-level writing assignments; correct execution of such assignments; review and practice of critical reading skills, including vocabulary development.

ENGL1001 English Composition I 3 cr.

A traditional freshman-level expository writing course concentrating on the principles of rhetoric. Included in the course will be numerous writing assignments, discussion and analysis of selected readings, studied for form and content, and a review of grammar and mechanics. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGF1001 or demonstrated competency in placement testing.

ENGL1003 Writing about Literature 3 cr.

The second half of the freshman English sequence, this course will introduce the imaginative genres of literature: poetry, short fiction, drama, and/or the novel. The course centers on finding source information and incorporating such materials fairly and effectively into argumentative and persuasive writing. Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL1001. Transfer students must have successfully completed a composition course comparable to ENGL1001 with a C or better.

ENGL1006 Children’s Literature 3 cr.

This course will provide a general overview of the field of children’s literature. The goals of the course are to share and develop knowledge and enthusiasm for children’s literature, to establish guidelines for evaluating children’s literature, and to develop an awareness of the various types of children’s literature. Course content includes the history of children’s literature, the importance of literature in a child’s life, ways to determine a child’s literacy preference and ways to foster early literacy in children.

ENGL1008 Thinking, Writing and Learning 6 credits; 10 weeks

This unique 10-week course will enable students to develop their reading and comprehension, thinking and writing skills while focusing on themes related to adult learning theory. The course will focus on developing theme, creating a solid research paper and conducting research.

ENGL1500 Effective Communications 3 cr.

This course offers students structured practice in the basic principles of communication. Course work emphasizes effective and correct use of language in both traditional and electronic business/professional writing. Since “communication” encompasses far more than written expression, ENGL1500 also focuses on communications within a group, oral presentation, and critical listening and thinking skills.

ENGL2003 Public Speaking 3 cr.

This course gives students training in the preparation of well-organized speeches, techniques for gaining and holding an audience, and methods to increase student confidence and poise. Students develop the skills to communicate effectively with others through practical experience in formal and semiformal speaking situations. Prerequisite: ENGL1001.

ENGL2102 Advanced Composition 3 cr.

An advanced rhetoric course that emphasizes refinement of style and critical thinking with a view towards writing argumentative essays that depend on sound inductive and deductive reasoning. Many essays are assigned that go beyond ENGL1001/1002. Prerequisites: ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.

ENGL2200 American Literature I 3 cr. (previously ENGL3001 American Literature I)

A study of the literary periods from the Puritans to approximately 1865. Through a close study of selections from Bradford, Taylor, Edwards, Bradstreet, Franklin, Jefferson, Paine, Irving, Cooper, Bryant, Emerson, Poe, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Longfellow, Melville, Dickinson, and Whitman, the student will trace literary trends. Reading and writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL1003.

ENGL2201 American Literature II 3 cr. (previously ENGL3002 American Literature II)

The study of literary movements from Local Realists through the Contemporaries. Among the authors to be studied are: Twain, Harte, Pierce, James, Crane, Adams, Drieser, O’Neill, Anderson, Frost, Cummings, Robinson, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Elliot, Faulkner and Miller. Students will analyze a variety of works and write essays. Prerequisite: ENGL1003.

ENGL2202 Introduction to Drama 3 cr.

Theories and development of tragedy and comedy plays from Ancient Greece to the Modern Era. Prerequisites: ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.

ENGL2302 Short Story 3 cr.

This course provides a detailed study and analysis of American and European short fiction, leading to effective understanding of the basic elements of fiction: plot structure, point of view, characterization, symbol and allegory, and theme. Prerequisites: ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.

ENGL2405 Leadership and Literature 3 cr.

This course studies various forms of literature (novels, short stories, drama, nonfiction essay) as well as films all focused on the theme of leadership.  By looking at different examples of moral, visionary, innovative and controversial leadership, we shall seek answers to some of the following questions: what are the characteristics and responsibilities of a leader?  How might we define a just leader?  Under what circumstances might a leader ignore the will of his/her subjects or employees?  When and how does a leader become a tyrant or ineffective?  And, by the same token, when are subjects justified in opposing or challenging a leader?  What are the barriers for women and minorities in becoming leaders?  Students shall also have the opportunity to investigate and analyze local and contemporary examples of leadership.  The course requires as prerequisite the successful completion of ENGL1003.

ENGL2500 Mythology 3 cr.

Myths and legends of Ancient Greece and Rome which have become a part of the classical tradition in Europe and America. Prerequisites: ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.

ENGL2600 Literature By Women 3 cr.

A full range of women’s writings in English from the Middle Ages to the present day. Both standard and newly discovered authors will be studied. All genres – poetry, short fiction, drama, essays, journals, and novels – will be examined. Prerequisites: ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.

ENGL2604 Screenwriting Basics I 3 cr.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of screenwriting for film and digital media. Students will learn the classic screenwriting structure (3 acts), story development, character development, and the need for conflict. What is a screenplay? What is your story about? Why do we need conflict? Who is your main character (protagonist)? What does s/he want? Who is the antagonist? How do you translate your idea into a screenplay? Students will learn how to write loglines, choose a story idea, and write a beat sheet for their idea. In the last 3 weeks, students will write the first act (the setup) of their screenplay. Throughout the course, detailed notes will be given by the instructor.

ENGL2605 Screenwriting Basics II 3 cr.

This course is a continuation for Screenwriting Basics I. During this course, students will write Act 2 (the confrontation) and Act 3 (the resolution) of their screenplay. Students will continue to learn about the major points of the screenplay's acts (the inciting incident, Plot Point 1, midpoint, Plot Point 2, climax, and resolution). The course will also cover topics such as creating memorable characters and scenes, and writing dialogue.  Student work will be evaluated and critiqued each week with detailed notes and suggestions. Using examples from popular movies, students will learn about plots points and act breaks. Students will also learn about developing memorable characters, scenes, and dialogue by using popular movies as examples. Prerequisite: ENGL2604.

ENGL2700 English Literature I 3 cr. – (previously ENGL3003 English Literature I)

A study of the major significant works of the masters of each literary period beginning from 449 through the Restoration. Students will study Beowulf, the Gawain post, Chaucer, Gower, Malory, the Cycle Plays, Skelton, Sidney, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Marvel, Vaughan, Crashaw, Herrick, and Milton. Reading intensive, essay writing. Prerequisites: ENGL1001, ENGL1003, and one 2000-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL2701 English Literature II 3 cr. (previously ENGL3004 English Literature II)

This course is a study of the trends and developments in English literature from the Age of Reason through the Contemporary Period. Among the writers to be studied are Pope, Swift, Fielding, Johnson, Austen, Bronte, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Carlyle, Macauley, Mill, Newman, Ruskin, Pater, Joyce, and Virginia Wolf. Prerequisite: ENGL1003.

ENGL3001 American Literature I 3 cr. – see ENGL2200 American Literature I

ENGL3002 American Literature II 3 cr. – see ENGL2201 American Literature II

ENGL3003 English Literature I 3 cr. – see ENGL2700 English Literature I

ENGL3004 English Literature II 3 cr. – see ENGL2701 English Literature II

ENGL3006 Coming of Age in World Fiction and Film 3 cr.

This course is intended to examine the process of coming to maturity in a variety of world cultures: Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, South America and the Caribbean, the United States.   Short stories and novels will be linked with films from a world region or a country in order to analyze both similarities and distinctions about the growth of an individual identity in the context of a geographic and cultural region.  Some of the topics to be considered in approaching coming of age within  each work/country include: relationships with parents/guardians and notion of “home”; gender roles; community beliefs and values (politics and social realities, the outside world); peers and rebellion/turning points; romance & sexuality.  Prerequisites: ENGL1003.

ENGL3008 War in Literature and Film  3 cr.

9/11 is the defining experience for the generation coming of age in the first decades of our century.  But wars have frequently shaped if not created the American experience.   Seen from this broader perspective, wars are more than isolated long ago events; wars, rather, are a political and cultural phenomenon that clarify a nation’s identity — who we are or what we wish to become or to avoid.  World War I, for instance, led to the disillusionment of Hemingway’s “lost generation.”  The Vietnam conflict influenced the counter-culture movement still with us today.  Through the study of novels, short stories, poems and films that depict war in the twentieth century, problems will be examined in representation, moral, and cultural history.  Prerequisites:  ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.

ENGL3100 Obsession and Violence in Shakespearean Drama and Film 3 cr.

This course examines the profound cultural, social, religious, and gender anxieties of the half-century between 1580 and 1630, anxieties that were manifested in dramas by Shakespeare and his contemporaries; these plays are replete with violence, sexual assaults, murders.  The readings will include cultural background to the dramas — the violence of royal power (Elizabeth I’s murderous road to succession, James I’s witch hunts), the obsession for control in matters of religion, morality, sexuality, and women.  The texts of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries will also be paired for analysis of the influence of one dramatist on another, the treatment of the theme of violence and obsession. Film adaptations will serve to study the impact of changes made to a text when it is remade into film.

Course work includes weekly papers, four online discussion forums on assigned topics, oral presentations, an annotated bibliography for a research topic, a longer paper (c. 20 pages) about one of the plays read and its relation to theatrical or cultural context.  Prerequisites: ENGL1001, ENGL1003, and one other literature course.

ENGL3205 Creative Writing 3 cr.

This 3000-level course focuses on analyzing imaginative literature and writing in the major genres in creative writing (fiction and poetry). The course is both a continuation and a development of the Freshmen English Sequence. In its reading component the course instructs students on paraphrase, imitation, explication, and analysis. In its writing segments the course emphasizes craft (plot, point of view, character), form (sonnet, free verse), and style (connotation, imagery, figures of speech). Students shall turn in three creative writing submissions as well as take unannounced quizzes, a midterm and a final examination on the assigned readings and lectures. Prerequisites: ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.

ENGL3206 Creative Nonfiction:  Telling True Stories 3 cr.

This course focuses on analyzing as well as writing in the principal genres in Creative Nonfiction (autobiography, memoir, documentary writing, and cultural criticism).   In its reading component this course instructs students on explication and analysis.  In its writing segments the course emphasizes craft (narrative suspense, characterization, structure), technique (observation, interview, research), and style (rhetorical schemes, diction, syntax).  Prerequisites:  ENGL1001 and ENGL1003.  Minimum 30 credits.

ENGL3509 World Literature 3 cr.

This 3000-level course analyzes Western imaginative writing in the context of world literature. The course thus assesses thematic concerns of the Western canon (by writers such as Keats, Tolstoy, Hoffman), and of those in literature less often represented in literary assessments — works from the Middle East, the Far East, Africa, and Latin America by writers such as Tagore, Achebe, Garcia Marquez, and so on. The course, consequently, examines individual works of art as both a specific and singular meditation (upon a theme, topic, situation) and a response to predecessors and to contemporaries. In its evaluation of aesthetic and ethical concerns, the course emphasizes the permeability of cultures and broadens the student’s sense of literary traditions. Students shall submit three written assignments as well as take unannounced quizzes, a midterm and a final examination on the assigned readings and lectures. Prerequisites: ENGL1001, ENGL1003, and SOCI1001 or Junior status.

ENGL3604 Writing for Digital Media 3 cr.

Writing for digital media is very different from writing for print, film, television, or other traditional media. As more people go online for their education, information, and entertainment, it’s important to write effectively for online audiences – whether you’re interested in writing your own blog, daily newspaper, or interactive media. The Internet has empowered the aspiring creative to be a writer, producer, editor, publisher, consumer, and reader all rolled into one. How can you make your writing stand out? How can you use different media elements to support your story? The course will give students the tools to deliver effective storytelling and writing in their digital media projects. Prerequisites: ENGL2604, ENGL2605.

ENGL3605 Writing for Animation 3 cr.

This course will focus on short-form animation writing (i.e. web/television) rather than feature film writing. Writing for animation is different from writing live-action because the writer must also think as a director. In animation writing, details must be written out, most often with camera angles, sound effects, and other characteristics. It's also a different kind of challenge because the scripts tend to be more action-packed and not as dialogue heavy. Whether it's writing for a 5, 7, 11, or 22-minute episode, this class will teach students the fundamentals of writing children's animation. Prerequisites: ENGL2604, ENGL2605.

ENGL3704 Contemporary American Poetry 3 cr.

This course will concern the poetic practice, theories and trends of contemporary and American poetry and poetics, from 1945 to the present. Students will read and analyze the works of such major poets as A.R. Ammons, John Ashbery, John Berryman, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Bly, Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Creeley, Rita Dove, Allen Ginsberg, Donald Hall, David Ignatow, Galway Kinnell, Carolyn Kizer, Stanley Kunitz, Denise Levertov, Robert Lowell, Mary Oliver, Charles Olsen, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath and Richard Wilbur. Students will also be expected to write numerous critical papers and attend local poetry readings during the summer. Prerequisites: ENGL1001, ENGL1003, and one 2000-level literature-based course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL3705 African-American Poetry from 1945 3 cr.

African-American poetry from 1945 to the present including works by Hayden, Brooks, Evans, Walcott, Sanchez, Baraka, Clifton, Harper, Gilbert and Dove. Prerequisites: ENGL1001, ENGL1003, and one 2000-level literature-based course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL3801 American Short Story 3 cr.

This reading and writing intensive course will deal with the American short story from a historical perspective as well as provide the student with a review of the aspects of fiction. The course will approach the American short story from a historical perspective beginning with the country’s earliest practitioner, Washington Irving, and cover the major American authors who used and perfected the form. The course will also place the selections within the major literary movements and demonstrate how selected short stories are characteristic of or anticipate literary trends. The student will be asked to present papers on certain aspects of various selections after close reading of the texts and relevant scholarship. Prerequisites: ENGL1001, ENGL1003, and one 2000-level literature-based course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL3802 African-American Novel 3 cr.

The rise and development of the African-American novel from the 19th through the 20th centuries beginning with its origins in the slave narrative and including works by Jacobs, Harper, Chesnutt, Dunbar, Toomer, Hurston, Wright, Petry, Ellison, Baldwin, Morrison, Walker and Wideman. Prerequisites: ENGL1001, ENGL1003, and one 2000-level literature-based course or permission of the instructor.

ENVS1001 Environmental Science I 4 cr.

A two-semester course for people with a non-science background. Provides a foundation for understanding the environmental problems we face and finding ways to solve them. Topics include: population dynamics, resource management, weather and the greenhouse effect, endangered species, geological hazards, and air and water pollution. Field trips and laboratory work.

ENVS1001A Environmental Science I 3 cr.

This course is the same as ENVS1001 except there is no lab.  Restrictions:  This course is only available for Accelerated Students.

ENVS1002 Environmental Science II 4 cr.

A continuation of ENVS1001.

ENVS1002A Environmental Science II 3 cr.

A continuation of ENVS1002 except there is no lab.  Restrictions:  This course is only available for Accelerated Students.

EQST1001 Foundations in Riding I 3 cr.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic concepts of horsemanship and equitation. The course is directed at students with no or limited prior riding instruction. The course includes both lecture and in-saddle work. (1 hour lecture and 2-2 hour labs). Students with previous riding experience may ask to test out of this course. An additional elective will then replace this course to maintain the credit load. Students who are not Equine Studies or Equine Management majors will be charged an additional fee of $775 for this course.

EQST1002 Foundations in Riding II 3 cr.

This course is a continuation of EQST1001 with further development of riding skills and the improvement of seat, balance and the feel of the horse.   Development of good riding technique is important before the student can go on to learn how to instruct. Students testing out of Foundations in Riding I, will still be required to take this course. The course includes both lecture and in-saddle work. (1 hour lecture and 2-2 hour labs). Pre-requisite: EQST1001 or permission of instructor. Students who are not Equine Studies or Equine Management majors will be charged an additional fee of $775 for this course.

EQST1601 Foundation in Equine Care 3 cr. (previously ANSC1601 Introduction to Equine Handling and Management)

An introduction to basic horsemanship.  Students learn and practice fundamental skills such as handling of horses, assessment of basic horse behavior, feeding and grooming horses, cleaning of stalls, and general day to day horse care.  Students are required to participate in a rotation through the barn during morning and afternoon chores.  Includes two hours of lecture and two hours of lab.

 

EQST2001 Principles of Riding Instruction I 3 cr.

Includes basic equitation, with riding at all 3 gaits, transitions, and school figures. The student begins to learn how to teach a rider to maintain straightness, relaxation, rhythm and balance of the horse. (2 hours lecture and 1-2 hour lab).   Pre-requisite: EQST1002.  Students who are not Equine Studies or Equine Management majors will be charged an additional fee of $775 for this course.

EQST2002 Principles of Riding Instruction II 3 cr.

This course involves intermediate equitation, building on previous experience, including lateral movements and skills necessary to maneuver a jump course. Students begin to learn how to teach a rider to correct their horse and adjust to different situations. The basic differences between teaching an individual versus group lessons are discussed.   The course will include lecture and riding time. Students may be required to assist in equitation and riding electives offered by the College. (2 hours lecture and 1-2 hour lab). Pre-requisite: EQST2001. Students who are not Equine Studies or Equine Management majors will be charged an additional fee of $775 for this course.

EQST2200 Equine Industry and the Law 3 cr.

This course discusses local, federal and, where appropriate, international laws as they relate to the equine industry, including laws pertinent to boarding and training, veterinary care, equine transit and drugs and medication.  Other topics may include humane care of animals and the differences between regulations and laws.

EQST2801 Fundamentals of Farm and Stable Management 3 cr. (previously MGMT2801 Fundamentals of Farm and Stable Management)

This course involves operation, application, and maintenance of the farm and stable, including maintaining feed and hay supplies and other barn inventories; management of stable employees, suppliers, vendors, professional services; waste management, and tack management; equine liability laws, equine insurance concerns, and employee and customer/client relations will be discussed.  Two hours lecture and a two hour lab.  Pre-requisite: EQST1601.

EQST3001 Principles of Riding Instruction III 4 cr.

This courses involves advanced equitation with dressage and jumping techniques and how to teach them. The student is expected to understand how to work with the rider to achieve the desired level of riding in various situations and with varying levels of student skills. (2 hours lecture and 2-2 hour labs). Pre-requisite: EQST2002. Students who are not Equine Studies or Equine Management majors will be charged an additional fee of $775 for this course.

EQST3100 Equine Behavior 3 cr.

Students develop an understanding of normal equine behavior, including how to influence it, and how to use it to advantage in training the horse. Prerequisite: ANSC1601; or BIOL1005, 1006 and VTSC2201.

EQST3104 Special Topics in the Equine Industry 3 cr.

Discussion of specific industry rules and requirements that may not be actual law but are a crucial part of the equine industry regulation. Topics for discussion may include drug testing of horses, show and competition requirements for horse and rider, vaccination and transport paperwork. Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic. Pre-requisite: EQST2200.

EQST3200 Basic Training Methods 3 cr.

Students learn how to work with the young horse and reschool the older horse. Teaching basic manners, working in hand and on the lunge are a significant portion of the course. (2 hours lecture and 1-2 hour lab). Pre-requisites: EQST3001, EQST3100. Students who are not Equine Studies or Equine Management majors will be charged an additional fee of $775 for this course.

EQST3300 Feeds and Forages 3 cr.

This course is designed to give the student an overview of crops used as feed and forage as well as a discussion of soil types and how they affect the nutritional value of the feed and forage. Includes identification of forage groups and their use for different nutritional needs and an introduction to pesticide use and control, fertilization, irrigation and drought management, and grazing management of pastures and fields. Pre-requisites: BIOL1001/1002, ANSC2403.

EQST3701 Equine Biomechanics and Conformation 3 cr.

A detailed course in conformation and the movement of joints and muscles. Students will review musculoskeletal anatomy and learn about the principles of normal equine movement.  Pathology associated with poor conformation and the methods to manage poor conformation will be discussed.  The role of the farrier in treatment of conformational diseases and the ability of the rider to influence the horse’s movement will be a part of the discussions.  Prerequisite: ANSC2701; or BIOL1005, 1006 and VTSC2201.

EQST4200 Training Under Saddle 4 cr.

Students learn how to start a young horse under saddle, develop balance and athletic ability/conditioning in the horse and introduce new skills leading to eventual competition. (2 hours lecture and 2-2 hour labs). Pre-requisite: EQST3200. Students who are not Equine Studies or Equine Management majors will be charged an additional fee of $775 for this course.

EQST4201 Equine Pathology and Diseases 3 cr.

This course presents an overview of the most common diseases specific to horses, how these diseases develop and may progress. Discussion of therapies and diagnostics is also included. Prerequisite: ANSC2701; or BIOL1005, 1006 and VTSC2201.

EQST4500 Equine Facilities Management 3 cr.

This course is designed to be a follow-up to EQST2801. Discussion of information from the previous course expands to include planning, financing and construction of the facility, and operational concerns such as waste management, ventilation, fencing, and feed storage. The specific needs of different types of facilities such as breeding, boarding, and training will be addressed. Students taking this course will be required to prepare a working plan for management of a theoretical facility.  Includes two hour lecture and two hour lab.  Pre-requisite: EQST2801.

EQST4906 Externship Module Ia – 3 cr.

This course incorporates on-site training in the student’s area of interest. The student will be required to fulfill 200 hours at a site chosen with the externship coordinator. While at this site the student will be expected to act in a professional manner as a representative of the College while she/he learns new skills and techniques. They will be required to write a comprehensive report at the end of the Internship discussing the activity and knowledge gained at the site. Pre-requisite: Senior status in the Equine Studies or Equine Management Program or advisor’s and Director’s approval.

EQST4908 Externship Module Ib - 3 cr.

Same as EQST4906.  Pre-requisite: Senior status in the Equine Studies Program or advisor’s and Director’s approval.

EXSC1000 Sports and Exercise Skills Instruction

The student is prepared to perform instruction in team and individual sports skills and in fitness exercise skills through the one credit courses listed below.  Students in the Health and Fitness concentration of Exercise Science may take no more than 3 of these courses to meet a graduation requirement of an open elective.

EXSC1001 Strength and Conditioning Skills (prior to fall 2011 this course known as      conditioning)

EXSC1002 Pedagogy

EXSC1003 Gymnastics

EXSC1004 Field Hockey

EXSC1005 Soccer

EXSC1006 Volleyball

EXSC1008 Aerobics

EXSC1009 Project Adventure

EXSC1101 Archery

EXSC1102 Badminton

EXSC1103 Bowling

EXSC1105 Sport Skills Instruction

EXSC1106 Tennis

EXSC1107 Yoga

EXSC1108 Social Dance

EXSC1205 Health and Fitness Skills 3 cr.

This course focuses on the basic concepts of fitnessexercise and conditioning. Students will participate in a wide variety of health and fitness assessments and physical activities to improve health and fitness levels. The course emphasizes the development of exercise skills and understanding exercise terminology and prescription, and introduces concepts related to teaching fitness skills to the general population.

EXSC1500 Stress Management 3 cr.

This course helps students to understand how events and activities of daily life can be perceived as stressful, causing negative effects on one’s health and well-being. It encourages students to discover their own personal sources of stress, their reactions to stress, and ways to better manage it. Concepts are applicable to education, sports, agency, and corporate settings.

EXSC2105 Teaching Sports Skills 3 cr.

This course focuses on the concepts related to organizing, implementing and teaching individual and team sports. Students will participate in a wide variety of sports and activities with emphasis on skill development as well as theory. The benefits of team and individual sports in personal health as well as in the corporate environment will be emphasized. This course involves activities outside of the traditional academic schedule, integrating lecture as well as skills lab.  This course does NOT meet the requirement for an EXSC approved elective for students in the SPMG program.

EXSC2202 Emergency Responder 3 cr.

The purpose of the comprehensive American Red Cross Emergency Response course is to provide the first responder with the knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency to help sustain life, ,reduce pain, and minimize the consequences injury or sudden illness until more advanced medical help can arrive.

EXSC2203 Personal and Community Health 3 cr.

This course is designed as an introductory course to provide students with information in the following areas: exercise, stress, nutrition, weight management, contraception, sexuality, intimate relationships, death and dying, HIV infection, STDs, tobacco drugs, and alcohol.

EXSC2204 Fitness for Life 3 cr.

This course introduces the student to the many components of physical fitness and wellness. Each student will have the opportunity to participate in discussions and activities that can help them assess their own level of fitness and its relationship to wellness. Course materials enable the student to initiate his or her personal healthy lifestyle program. Lecture topics include: health promotion and disease prevention, physical fitness, weight management, adaptation to the aging process, and personal safety.

EXSC2205 Structural Kinesiology 3 cr.

This course introduces basic mechanical concepts related to human movement. Through lecture and laboratory activities, the student studies the skeletal anatomy, structure and function of the joint, voluntary (skeletal) muscle, and muscle group involvement in selected activities. Emphasis is on normal human structure and function, but abnormal movement leading to athletic injuries is also addressed.

EXSC2705 Advanced Personal Trainer 4 cr.

This course is specifically designed to prepare students who seek certification (although it is optional) from the national recognized organizations such as the National Council of Strength and Fitness (NCSF) and American College and Sports Medicine (ACSM) as (advanced) personal trainer. The course helps students building up the foundation for study in a wide range of Health and Fitness related fields, such as exercise physiology, biomechanics, and nutrition. Particular attention is placed upon the applications of structural kinesiology to a variety of exercises.  The assessment and prescription in health and fitness are also introduced.  Prerequisites: EXSC2205.

EXSC3005 Biomechanics in Sports 4 cr.

This course provides a systematic introduction to the major principles of biomechanics, emphasizing the contributions that biomechanics makes to the understanding of human movement. The objective of this course is also to develop an awareness of selected mechanical and anatomical concepts related to human performance and injury prevention. Prerequisite: EXSC2205.

EXSC3105 Nutrition 3 cr.

This course helps students to understand the processes involved in nourishing the body. It includes the study of nutrients, their physiological functions, and their interrelationship within the body. Course content and materials focus on the importance of making food choices that minimize the risks of developing nutrition-related diseases. The course uses the United States Department of Agriculture’s most current Dietary Guidelines for Americans in order to help students identify the characteristics of a nutritious diet. This course also offers opportunities for students to examine and discuss the value of and scientific basis for consuming various dietary substances promoted in the media. Examples include antioxidants, dietary supplements, and ergogenic aids. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EXSC3201 Consumer Health 3 cr.

This course is designed to help people make informed decisions regarding their evaluation and understanding of health products and services. Some topics to be covered include health insurance, food buying, quacks, fad diets and understanding the misconceptions concerning health.

EXSC3205 Drugs and Society 3 cr.

This course exposes students to biopsychosocial models used to explain substance use, abuse, dependency, and addiction. Students gain an understanding of genetic, physiological, and neurobiological factors contributing to alcohol use and abuse, as well as familiarity with the impact of these behaviors on the individual, the family, and the community. Specific attention is given to the roles of gender, age, culture and religious training as they relate to pattern of use.

EXSC3300 Exercise Physiology 4 cr.

Through classroom lecture and laboratory activities, this course provides students with an opportunity to observe and discuss the acute responses and chronic adaptations of the human body to physical activity. Mechanisms of neuromuscular, metabolic, cardiorespiratory control and adaptation during and after exercise activity are emphasized. The environmental influences on human performance and health related aspects of exercise are also discussed. Prerequisites: BIOL2503 and BIOL2504.

EXSC3500 Human Sexuality 3 cr.

The cultural, psychological, ethical and biological aspects of sexuality are examined. The focus of this course is the multiple roles which include a component of sexuality education as a component of human health and wellness. Students examine their own views regarding sexuality in order to prepare them to function more effectively within those roles.

EXSC4105 Principles of Strength and Conditioning 3 cr.

This course integrates the knowledge and skills acquired in previous courses which are essential to become a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. Students will learn the latest scientific principles and theories and understand the purpose of using correct forms of exercise, different arrangements of training system, and principles of periodization. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to design sound personalized strength and conditioning programs for athletes of all types for various sports. Prerequisite: EXSC2705 Advanced Personal Trainer.

EXSC4205 Lifespan Motor Development and Learning 3 cr.

The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to basic physiological, psychological and biomechanical foundations of human motor control. The main goal is to provide an overview of the mechanisms of how we control our movements, how perception and movement are integrated, how aging affects motor control, and how new movement patterns are acquired during skill acquisition and motor development. Prerequisite: EXSC2205.

EXSC4800 Assessment & Prescription in Health & Fitness 4 cr.

This is an advanced health and fitness class.  This course covers thoroughly the process of assessment and prescription in health and fitness.  Students will learn how to use relevant fitness testing equipment, learn the guidelines and protocols for safe and effective exercise testing for normal and special populations, and learn how to prescribe appropriate exercise programs according to individual needs.  The course will emphasize application and hands-on activities and use varied methodologies, such as laboratory activities, case studies, and course projects (or community service).  Prerequisite: EXSC2705.

EXSC4908 Internship in Health/Fitness 6 cr.

The primary purpose of the practicum experiences is to expose the students to “real world” work experience. Arrangements will be made for the student to work and function within one or more related sites of their interest, such as health and wellness clubs, corporate and commercial fitness facilities, clinical rehabilitations, community health service programs, or work with certified strength and conditioning coach (or athletic trainer) in sports teams.  The field experience will be paired seminars, which will provide students with an opportunity to discuss and share their experiences. A minimum of 280 intern hours are required.  These intern hours include the field experience, seminar, and any related activities, such as designing program or research, conducted at home or library.  Prerequisite: approval of the program director.

F

» FINA2700 Personal Financial Management 3 cr.
» FORE2001 Introduction to Forensics 4 cr.
» FORE2002 Collection/Preservation of Evidence 4 cr.
» FORE3100 Criminal Investigation 3 cr.

FINA2700 Personal Financial Management 3 cr.

The development of personal investment strategies using money and credit, securities and portfolio management, budgeting, insurance, taxes, retirement programs, and estate planning.

FORE2001   Introduction to Forensics 4 cr.

An introduction to the field application of biology, chemistry, and physical sciences to the examination/collection methods of forensic evidence at a crime scene. Exploration of the underlying physiological and biochemical basis for forensic methods; laboratory analysis includes microscopy, chromatography, hair, fingerprints, serology and introduction to DNA profiling.

FORE2002   Collection/Preservation of Evidence 4 cr.

A continuation of FORE2001. Continued exploration into examination and collection methods used to identify evidence of criminal activity, including chemical techniques for developing fingerprints, blood isozymes, PCR for DNA profiling, drug identification and ELISA. Prerequisite: FORE2001.

FORE3100 Criminal Investigation 3 cr.

Examines the evolution of the investigative process. Interviewing and interrogation techniques will be studied, along with gathering and organizing information and evidence. Areas of study will include crimes against persons, crimes against property, enterprise crimes, technology crimes, and terrorism. The use of critical thinking and analytical skills, within the framework of the investigative process, will be emphasized.

G

» GAME1001 History of Game Development 3 cr.
» GAME1002 Introduction to Game Design
» GAME1120 Introduction to Game Design 3 cr.
» GAME2110 Storyboarding Animation 3 cr.
» GAME2120 Intermediate Game Development 3cr.
» GAME2170 Scrum Management 3 cr.
» GAME2200 2D Animation
» GAME2301 Organic Modeling 3 cr.
» GAME2302 Rendering and Compositing 3 cr.
» GAME2400 Storyboarding Animation
» GAME2701 Digital Audio Production 3 cr.
» GAME2702 Digital Music Studio 3 cr.
» GAME2703 Music Theory 3 cr.
» GAME3100 Game Programming 1
» GAME3102 Game Programming 2
» GAME3111 Computer Illustration for Game Design 3 cr.
» GAME3120 3D Modeling 3 cr.
» GAME3130 3D Animation 3 cr.
» GAME3135 Game Programming I 3 cr.
» GAME3145 Game Programming II 3 cr.
» GAME3150 Level Design 3cr.
» GAME3160 Machinima 3cr.
» GAME3170 Game Production and Prototyping 3 cr.
» GAME3200 Digital Audio Video
» GAME3300 Game Production and Prototyping
» GAME3301 3D Animation
» GAME3302 Rigging for Animation 3 cr.
» GAME3500 Computer Illustration for Game Design
» GAME3701 Music Composition for Games 3 cr.
» GAME3702 Sound-Design Toolbox 3 cr.
» GAME4115 Artificial Intelligence 3cr.
» GAME4120 Literary Development of Virtual Worlds 3 cr.
» GAME4300 Career Internship 3 cr.
» GAME4301 Character Animation 3 cr.
» GAME4400 Advanced Topics in Game Development 3 cr.
» GAME4510 Senior Game Project I 3 cr.
» GAME4520 Senior Game Project II 3 cr.
» GAME4610 Portfolio 3cr.
» GAME4701 Game Audio Production Studio 3 cr.
» GAME4801 Sr. Game Project 1
» GAME4802 Sr. Game Project 2
» GOVT1108 American Government 3 cr.
» GOVT1109 State and Local Government 3 cr.
» GOVT3001 Political Theory 3 cr.
» GOVT4100 American Constitutional Law 3 cr.
» GRPH1001 History of Graphic Design 3 cr.
» GRPH1900 Digital Presentation 3 cr.
» GRPH2104 Graphic Design I
» GRPH2105 Graphic Design II
» GRPH2110 Typography 3 cr.
» GRPH2120 Techniques of Vector Imaging 3 cr.
» GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging 3 cr.
» GRPH2140 Graphic Design I 3 cr.
» GRPH2150 Graphic Design II 3 cr.
» GRPH2160 Introduction to Web Design 3cr.
» GRPH2170 Principles of Digital Imaging 3 cr.
» GRPH2180 Animation and Motion Graphics 3 cr.
» GRPH2205 Electronic Illustration
» GRPH2600 Electronic Graphic Design 3 cr.
» GRPH3104 Graphic Design III
» GRPH3110 Advanced Web Design 3cr.
» GRPH3120 Publication Design 3 cr.
» GRPH3130 Advertising Design 3 cr.
» GRPH3140 Package Design 3cr.
» GRPH3400 Typography
» GRPH3502 Electronic Pre-Press 3cr.
» GRPH3700 Advertising Design
» GRPH3702 Advanced Advertising Design 3cr.
» GRPH4100 Information Design 3 cr.
» GRPH4210 Special Projects in Design 3cr.
» GRPH4215 Corporate Design 3cr.
» GRPH4300 Career Internship 3 cr.
» GRPH4220 Advanced Digital Photography 3 cr.
» GRPH4400 Advanced Topics in Design 3 cr.
» GRPH4510 Design Portfolio 3 cr.
» GRPH 4520 Senior Team Project 3 cr.
» GRPH4530 Professional Practices in Graphic Design 3cr.

GAME1001 History of Game Development 3 cr.

This course covers the history and evolution of electronic game development, focusing on design elements, technical innovations, societal influence, and the impact of marketing. The course will dissect the roles of programmers, designers, artists, and writers, as well as provide an overview of various software and hardware developments for the gaming industry. Students will gain a global and historic view of the interactive entertainment field and its origins.

GAME1002 Introduction to Game Design – see GAME1120 Introduction to Game Design

GAME1120 Introduction to Game Design 3 cr. (previously Game1002 Intro to Game Design)

This course serves to introduce the various aspects of game design for those intending to work as part of management, production, and/or design teams. The student will begin with an analysis of gaming, with consideration of various platforms, game genres, playability, objectives, rule dynamics, and overall quality. Further, the student will learn the elements of production including game conceptualization, story development, and interface, character, and soundtrack, and level design.

GAME2110 Storyboarding Animation 3 cr. (previously GAME2400 Storyboarding Animation)

This course covers the design process of storyboarding which encompasses the fundamentals in the pre-production phase of any digital video, multimedia, or computer gaming project. During the first phase, students will learn the value of project management, presentation skills, and effective communication. Second phase lessons include the technical aspects of planning scenes with consideration given to scene set up, stage mapping, virtual or physical camera angles, and object and character movement. Emphasis will be placed on visually translating written descriptions and rendering genre and tone through effective visual blocking. Production techniques include the use of traditional drawing materials to formulate sketches, text description boards, and prototype digital renderings. Prerequisite: ARTS1100; Students with significant drawing experience may apply to the instructor for permission to take this course concurrently with ARTS1100.

GAME2120 Intermediate Game Development 3cr. (Previously GAME2200 2D Animation)

This course introduces students to more advanced concepts in game design and development such as ideation, digital prototyping, interface design, usability testing, team work, project scoping and management.  The main emphasis of the class is on the conceptualization of innovative design goals and the execution of those goals in the form of a complete, polished intermediate game project. Prerequisite: GAME2110 Storyboarding Animation OR Game1120 Intro to Game Design.

GAME2170 Scrum Management 3cr.

In this course, the student will learn how to apply Agile and Scrum techniques to manage software and interactive media development projects. Through immersive and evolving case studies and other activities, the student will acquire the theory, practical knowledge and skills to plan, manage and close a software/game development project. Perquisites: MGMT1000 or GAME1120.

GAME2200 2D Animation – see GAME2120 Intermediate Game Development

GAME2301 Organic Modeling 3 cr.

This course covers the techniques involved in building organic 3D models using industry standard modeling-specific applications. Emphasis is placed on human and non-human figure study, its importance the modeling process, and the utilization of application tools for an efficient production pipeline. Methodologies for building animation-ready assets from concept sculpts will also be explored.

GAME2302 Rendering and Compositing 3 cr.

This course covers the techniques involved in preparing 3D models for the rendering process. Students will design complex shading networks, explore various light types and attributes, and build lighting rigs common to the animation, visual effects, and gaming industries. Additionally, tools and concepts related to the compositing process are explored including the utilization of render layers and render passes.

GAME2400 Storyboarding Animation – see GAME2110 Storyboarding Animation

GAME2701 Digital Audio Production 3 cr.

This course explores the fundamentals of the medium of sound and processes of sound-design, with the goal of understanding, articulating, and creating audio assets for games. Through demos and creative projects, students will experiment with the essential building blocks of sound and explore audio principles such as acoustics and perception, the use of microphones and digital recording hardware, editing, signal-processing and mixing using ProTools, Foley recording and sound-effect production, sampling and MIDI, audio synchronization to video, and applications of audio assets in digital-media and game development. The course sets a solid foundation for the understanding of sound while developing a strong toolset for working within the medium. This course meets the requirements for a Game Design or Game Programming elective.  No previous experience with sound or music is required.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

GAME2702 Digital Music Studio 3 cr.

This course explores the world of MIDI and sound-design through virtual-instruments and synthesized techniques. Through demos and creative projects, students will learn essential building blocks of synthesized sounds by using virtual-instruments in ProTools, interfacing MIDI controllers with software, creation of sound-effects through synthesized means, basic rhythmic and tonal music theory, and the creation of musical assets for games. The course sets a solid foundation for the understanding of sound-design and a historical context for the field of Game Audio, while developing a strong toolset for working within the medium.  This course meets the requirements for a Game Design or Game Programming elective.  No previous experience with sound or music is required.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

GAME2703 Music Theory 3 cr.

This course explores the fundamentals of music theory, with the goal of understanding and creating music for games.  Topics cover the fundamentals of music theory including rhythms, scales, intervals, chords, keys, harmony, and modulations.  Composition concepts are also introduced and explored. The course sets a solid foundation for the understanding and application of musical terms and structures in the development of game audio, and a historical context for game music. This course meets the requirements for a Game Design or Game Programming elective.  No previous experience with sound or music is required.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

GAME3100 Game Programming 1 – see GAME3135 Game Programming 1

GAME3102 Game Programming 2 – see GAME3145 Game Programming 2

GAME3111 Computer Illustration for Game Design 3 cr. (Previously GAME3500 Computer Illustration for Game Design)

This course covers the creation and implementation of computer graphics within the framework of multimedia and game design. Students will learn how to use computer graphic software such as Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop to render image files for use in the digital medium. Each phase of graphic creation will be considered including digitizing a base image, creating and manipulating a digital graphic directly within one of the software packages, importing and exporting between programs, and outputting to any one of various suitable graphic formats. Emphasis will be given to designing graphics for digital video, animation, multimedia design, online development, and game production. Prerequisite: GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging.

GAME3120 3D Modeling 3 cr. (Previously GAME2300 3D Modeling)

This course covers the principles and techniques involved in creating 3 dimensional media. Students will learn the step by step process of 3D graphics including modeling with NURBs, polygons, and subdivisions using sophisticated 3D software such as Maya. They will also acquire skills in texture design and UV Mapping skills, lighting, scene setup and rendering.

GAME3130 3D Animation 3 cr. (Previously GAME3301 3D Animation)

This course covers the techniques involved in animating 3D models in 3D scenes utilizing sophisticated software such as Maya. Students will learn the process of creating and building a 3D scene from objects, lighting placement, and camera manipulation. Furthermore, the animation of characters including model skeleton building, rigging, and key frame animation will be covered in detail. Prerequisite: GAME3120 3D Modeling.

GAME3135 Game Programming I 3 cr. (Previously GAME3100 Game Programming 1)

This course provides a review of the fundamentals of C++, the standard language of the game industry, and builds on those fundamentals to create moderately complex games. Beginning with simple games, the course progresses through more interesting game functions: game loops, using and creating software objects, using functions to break game programs into manageable chunks of code, how to address and manipulate computer memory, and define objects in terms of other objects. Prerequisite: INFO2300 Data Structures.

GAME3145 Game Programming II 3 cr.  (Previously GAME3102 Game Programming 2)

This course focuses on the subject of game programming using a third party 3D game engine to provide a uniform interface for audio, 3D visuals, and device input. Students will use open source multi-platform, tools and game libraries, such as those available in Torque to produce platform independent code. Students will also have the opportunity to interact with the online game programming community to further develop their skills. Prerequisite: GAME3135 Game Programming I.

GAME3150 Level Design 3cr.

This course teaches the concepts and skill sets involved in creating successful levels within any game format. Emphasis will be given to integrating levels within a given game design, construction guided by balance and rhythm, and approaches for handling technical and environmental limitations. Students will develop levels for existing game engines as well as utilizing original game aesthetics. Prerequisite: GAME2120 Intermediate Game Development which may be taken concurrently.

GAME3160 Machinima 3cr. (Previously GAME3200 Digital Audio Video)

This course covers the technical aspects of working within the challenging medium of digital audio and video production. With a focus on using non-linear editing methods, students will be able to take full advantage of digital editing processes utilizing the latest in audio and video software such as Sound Forge, Adobe Premiere, and Adobe After Effects. Students will cover all aspects of the production process including audio and video recording and capturing, digital editing of sound and video, special effects generation, and final preparation for use in interactive media such as DVDs, advanced video games, and the World Wide Web – each with its own technical and production requirements. Prerequisite: GAME2110 Storyboarding Animation.

GAME3170 Game Production and Prototyping 3 cr. (Previously GAME3300 Game Production and Prototyping)

This course teaches the fundamental principles and strategies of game production and prototyping, allowing the student to assume the role of project producer. Students will learn the core elements of game assembly, project management, development tracking and troubleshooting. They will become familiar with the procedures necessary for successful game development, from the conception stage and on through the implementation stage, covering the various technologies prevalent in the game design industry. Production focus will be on prototyping, planning, implementation, testing, and tracking across financial and technological constraints. Prerequisite: GAME2120 Intermediate Game Development; Students with previous game design experience may apply to the instructor for permission to take this course concurrently with GAME1001.

GAME3200 Digital Audio Video – see GAME3160 Machinima

GAME3300 Game Production and Prototyping – see GAME3170 Game Production and Prototyping

GAME3301 3D Animation – see Game3130 3D Animation

GAME3302 Rigging for Animation 3 cr.

This course covers the techniques involved in preparing 3D models for the animation process. Students will design efficient and intuitive rig systems using popular industry tools such as bones, joints, control objects, and constraints. Furthermore, the process of skinning and application interoperability will be explored.

GAME3500 Computer Illustration for Game Design – see GAME3111 Computer Illustration for Game Design

GAME3701 Music Composition for Games 3 cr.

The course explores advanced game music production concepts and techniques.  Topics build on the Music Theory class and cover scoring, arranging, and orchestration.  Adaptive and non-linear audio concepts are introduced in the context of gameplay, as well as subjects such as looping, branching, and randomization, transition matrices, algorithmic operations, and creating multi-layered stems.  Concepts are introduced and explored through applied creative projects.  Historical context is given within the development of game music.  This course meets the requirements for a Game Design or Game Programming elective.  Prerequisite is Music Theory.

GAME3702 Sound-Design Toolbox 3 cr.

This course surveys advanced sound-design tools and software used by professionals in the industry and expands upon skills from Digital Audio Production and/or Digital Music Studio. Numerous synthesis techniques and procedures are covered such as advanced analog emulation and subtractive synthesis, FM, wave-table, granular, and semi-modular synthesis, physical modeling, software samplers, and signal processing through effects.  Tools created by independent designers will also be implemented and critiqued.  Students will use these tools for advanced sound production and the development of audio assets for games.  This course meets the requirements for a Game Design or Game Programming elective.  Prerequisite is either Digital Audio Production or Digital Music Studio.

GAME4115 Artificial Intelligence 3cr.

This course provides an overview of the field of artificial intelligence with special attention to uses in the electronic gaming field. Students will develop logic grids for intelligent agents, discuss how learning and communication are integral elements of artificial intelligence. Philosophical discussion of such concepts as intelligence, cognition, learning, and the Turing test will be addressed. Prerequisite: GAME3145 Game Programming I.

GAME4120 Literary Development of Virtual Worlds 3cr.

This course looks at traditional storytelling and literary development. Students will then apply classical techniques to the development of virtual worlds, both through non-linear narrative and 3D deployment of literary creations. Prerequisite: GAME3150 Level Design.

GAME4300 Career Internship 3cr. (Meets requirement of ARTS4500 for Game Design and Game Programming students)

The junior or senior student is required to pursue an internship with a local professional design firm in which the student can apply his/her academic experience to the professional working environment. The student intern works under the supervision and guidance of a faculty member in partnership with the student business supervisor. Prerequisite: GAME3120 3D Modeling or GAME3135 Game Programming I.

GAME4301 Character Animation 3 cr.

Animated characters are becoming increasingly popular as pivotal assets in animation, storytelling, and simulation related industries. The fundamentals of creating animation lie in the ability to generate believable characters that have emotion and life. This course will explore tools and techniques used in the animation industry to design convincing character animations including blocking, breakdowns, non-linear, and procedural animation. Prerequisite: GAME3302 Rigging for Animation.

GAME4400 Advanced Topics in Game Development 3cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.  Prerequisite:  GAME3120 3D Modeling or GAME3135 Game Programming I.

GAME4510 Senior Game Project I 3 cr. (Previously GAME4801 Sr. Game Project 1)

This senior-level seminar is flexible in both format and content due to the ever advancing technology within the field of game design and represents the culmination of the student’s Bachelor of Arts in Game Design experience. Working with the professor, students will select an appropriate topic for the design of an original interactive gaming project which will result in a presentation of associated development stages and final program. The thesis work will allow students to produce an advanced, cohesive project based on their accumulated course work within the major and further focused research and development for this seminar. It is intended to simulate the real-world experience of game project developer/designer. Prerequisite: GAME3120 3D Modeling or GAME3135 Game Programming I.

GAME4520 Senior Game Project II 3 cr.  (Previously GAME4802 Sr. Game Project 2)

This semester long seminar is designed to allow students to concentrate on one of two aspects of game development while working as part of a complete project team. Working under the supervision of the professor, students will be divided into two departments to simulate the real-world environment of game production. Students will work in either narrative and design development or in interactive development and production. The thesis project will require ongoing professional communication between the two departments, while individual team member work will result in a large body of original graphic, video, audio, and programming pieces for integration into a cohesive final project. The students will present their project to a panel of department faculty, accompanied by developmental presentations and drafts utilized during the semester to represent the process involved. The course is intended to draw on students’ previous coursework and research. Prerequisite: GAME3120 or GAME3135.

GAME4610 Portfolio 3cr.

A professional review of a student’s cumulative work toward the degree is provided. The student spends the semester gathering work, updating items, participating in critiques, and creating a professional presentation of his/her work which is meant to be shown for career and graduate school opportunities. Prerequisite: GAME4510 Senior Game Project I.

GAME4701 Game Audio Production Studio 3 cr.

The overall purpose of this course is to design and create a fully realized game audio production to be implemented in a working game, in tandem with the Senior Game Project course.  The course involves creating all audio assets to be used in-game including sound-effects, music, and voice-overs, and the implementation of adaptive audio theories, real-time mixing, and middleware.  Topics build on previous sound-design and composition courses.  Students will work both individually and as a team.  This course deepens the preparation of students for entry-level work in sound design and music at a game development company or as a freelance professional.  This course meets the requirements for a Game Design or Game Programming elective.  Prerequisites are either Sound-Design Toolbox or Music Composition for Games.

GAME4801 Sr. Game Project 1 – see GAME4510 Sr. Game Project 1

GAME4802 Sr. Game Project 2 – see GAME4520 Sr. Game Project 2

GOVT1108 American Government 3 cr.

An analysis of the United States national government with primary emphasis on its constitutional structure and secondarily on its institutional development.

GOVT1109 State and Local Government 3 cr.

An analysis of state and local government institutions in the United States with emphasis on structure, function, policies, and recurrent political problems of these institutions.

GOVT3001 Political Theory 3 cr.

This course analyzes political thought throughout history and its impact on government and society. Students will be exposed to the work of theorists such as Plato, Socrates, Machiavelli, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Locke, Jefferson, and others who have influenced political thought.

GOVT4100 American Constitutional Law 3 cr.

An introduction to the complex processes involved with the development of constitutional doctrine in the United States. Students will study the major cases and Supreme Court decisions that serve as the principle vehicle for constitutional elaboration, adaptation and change. Prerequisite: GOVT1108.

GRPH1001 History of Graphic Design 3 cr.

This course covers the major historical, technological and cultural impacts of graphic design including design movements, typographical and print advancements and important and influential designers.  Graphic design history will be approached from a global perspective as the student learns about important designers and design movements from all parts of the globe starting with the earliest forms of communication all the way through modern design styles.

GRPH1900 Digital Presentation 3 cr.

This course will be a combination of several applications, such as Photoshop, In Design, and Illustrator, to help the interior design students improve their font choices, layout skills, and photo manipulation for presentation purposes.

GRPH2104 Graphic Design I – see GRPH2140 Graphic Design I

GRPH2105 Graphic Design II – see GRPH2150 Graphic Design II

GRPH2110 Typography 3 cr. (Previously GRPH3400 Typography)

This course is an exploration of typography, both the history of type and the importance of typography in the design process. Students will learn the history of typography from the origin of the alphabet and the invention of movable type, to the new and modern computer generated fonts. Students will create a variety of projects ranging from the abstract, using basic letter forms, shapes and structures, to the practical designing posters, logos, typographic grids, structures and more! Students will brainstorm ideas through discussion and thumbnail sketches. Most projects will be completed using Adobe Illustrator.

GRPH2120 Techniques of Vector Imaging 3 cr. (Previously GRPH2205 Electronic Illustration)

This course introduces the student to vector imaging using Adobe Illustrator to create digital illustrations. The course content will focus on drawing in the vector format using the pen and brush, making paths, masks and gradients to use as illustrations for design projects. The course will also emphasize typography as an illustrative device as well as various techniques and tools used in the creation of line art and color illustrations.

GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging 3 cr.  (Previously GRPH2600 Electronic Graphic Design)

This course introduces the student to the process of creating and designing with Raster images using Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn the scanning process and the importance of file sizes and resolution. The course focus will be on preparing photographic images for print and web applications and the different needs of each medium. Students will learn to adjust color, work in layers, create masks, use brushes and filters and appropriate color management for print (CMYK) and web (RGB).

GRPH2140 Graphic Design I 3 cr. (Previously GRPH2104 Graphic Design I)

The Graphic Design core sequence consists of two courses which introduce the student to concepts and facets of the design process from inception to finished product. Each course presents a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills that will prepare the student to enter and succeed in the professional Graphic Design field. Graphic Design I introduces the student to the history of the graphic arts. The student will learn the art, craft and skill sets needed for design, layout and production in the ever-changing world of graphic design. Manual techniques will be the foundation of the study of graphic design. Problem solving exercises using visual expression will teach the students to communicate on the graphic level. Prerequisites: GRPH2110; GRPH2120 or concurrent.

GRPH2150 Graphic Design II 3 cr. (Previously GRPH2105 Graphic Design II)

Graphic Design II is a continuation of GRPH2140 Graphic Design I. This course is a combination of the theoretical knowledge and practical skills which introduces the student to concepts and facets of the design process from inception to finished product using Adobe InDesign. The course will teach students problem-solving exercises and the understanding of exactly how to communicate ideas graphically. This course develops the student’s understanding of language and terminology in electronic image assembly and electronic pre-press. The student will learn how to prepare fonts, images, and documents for printing, including bleeds, trapping, and the usage of spot (Pantone, Toyo, etc.) colors. Prerequisites: GRPH2130 & GRPH2140.

GRPH2160 Introduction to Web Design 3cr. (Previously COMM3300 Introduction to Web Design)

In this course, students learn Dreamweaver, the industry standard program for web site design and production. The course will emphasize the design process from need analysis and concept creation to creating a full web site. The course covers the design and construction of Web pages and sites, with an emphasis on the design, content, storyboarding, communication and navigation processes.

GRPH2170 Principles of Digital Imaging 3 cr.  (Previously ARTS2500)

This course introduces students to the basics of image acquisition, photographic techniques, and digital processes. Through shooting assignments and hands-on computer lab work, the students concentrate on taking the image while learning creative control and visual skills, preparing project files and outputting them to print. The students will produce a wide range of work to be used in a professional presentation. Students are required to own or have access to a camera. Prerequisite: none

GRPH2180 Animation and Motion Graphics 3 cr. (Previously COMM3503)

This course will focus on the cross-over of the basic principles of animation, motion perception, and design for the digital medium.  An introduction to the techniques used in traditional animation, including conceptualization, planning, sketching, and cell creation will provide the necessary backbone for this course’s emphasis on digital 2D animation for internet communication.  Students will learn how to create computer based graphics for use within digital animation software.  Prerequisites: GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging.

GRPH2205 Electronic Illustration – see GRPH2130 Techniques of Vector Imaging

GRPH2600 Electronic Graphic Design 3 cr.

This course introduces the student to the process of bringing graphic design onto the computer platform. It briefly reviews the traditional layout and mechanical processes to familiarize the student with the basic procedure and terminology used in the printing process. A review and further exploration of page layout program, Quark XPress, will combine with advanced instruction on the other design standard software applications, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. How they work together and individually to produce finished files for printed material including stationery, product fact sheets, newsletters and multiple page brochures will be emphasized. Additionally, the student will be introduced to Adobe Acrobat and its Portable Document Format (PDF), used to create high-quality, low-memory e-mailable files from final Quark/Illustrator/Photoshop files for client review and approval. Final files will be prepared for printing.  (Students who need this course should take GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging).

GRPH3104 Graphic Design III – see GRPH3120 Publication Design

GRPH3110 Advanced Web Design 3cr. (Previously COMM3305 Advanced Web Design)

This course is a continuation of GRPH2160 Introduction to Web Design. The students will construct XHTML pages and use CSS to format and build the pages using the new template engine in DMX. The student will also learn how to incorporate audio and video files, JavaScript rollovers, and libraries and create dynamic interactive web pages. The dynamic integration between Dreamweaver and Fireworks will also be covered. Prerequisites: GRPH2160.

GRPH3120 Publication Design 3 cr. (Previously GRPH3104 Graphic Design III)

Advanced production of multi-page documents, such as: books, newsletters, annual reports and magazines. This course will teach students to solve problems dealing with page flow, multi-page layouts and advanced techniques of the page layout software, Adobe InDesign. This course will also emphasize advanced pre-press skills to pre-flight and package their finished designs for commercial print. Prerequisite: GRPH2150

GRPH3130 Advertising Design 3 cr. (Previously GRPH3700 Advertising Design)

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of advertising design and demonstrates the creative usage of words and images in effective print communications as created by an advertising agency art director. The course focuses on the creative process, on problem solving, concept development, and on the relationship between the designer, the art director, the client, and the consumer. The student will learn audience definition, client relationships, product positioning, creative strategy, and presentation skills. Emphasis will be placed on print media such as: newspaper, magazine, billboard, d/mail and P.O.P. In-class discussions will include the principles of design, and how they are applied as a driving force in designing and executing advertising concepts. Prerequisite: GRPH2150

GRPH3140 Package Design 3cr.  (Previously GRPH3502 Electronic Pre-Press)

This advanced design course examines the field of package design. Students will work from concept to finished product, combining their pre-press and production knowledge to create folds, tabs and die cut designs for packaging. This course will focus on the unique problems of package design by working with students hands-on to create concepts and package designs for products. They will construct 3-D facsimiles of their designs, focusing on function and innovation. Prerequisite: GRPH3120

GRPH3400 Typography – see GRPH2110 Typography

GRPH3502 Electronic Pre-Press 3cr.

This course further develops the students understanding of language and terminology in electronic image assembly and electronic pre-press. The student will learn how to prepare fonts, images, and documents for printing, including bleeds, trapping, and the usage of spot (Pantone, Toyo, etc.) colors. Particular emphasis will be placed on file preparation, pre-flighting, and compiling a single folder to be compressed and sent to print. Students will learn these skills using professional-level software including Quark XPress outputting module, Adobe InDesign, Acrobat, Illustrator, and Photoshop. Prerequisites: GRPH2105.  (Students who need this course should take GRPH3140 Package Design).

GRPH3700 Advertising Design – see GRPH3130 Advertising Design

GRPH3702 Advanced Advertising Design 3cr.

This advanced course will continue to develop the basic skills learned in GRPH3130 Advertising Design I. Emphasis will be placed on individual project research, creative interpretation, conceptual development, and final project production. This course is offered as an GRPH elective for those students who wish to expand their focus in designing for the advertising industry offering the student the opportunity to learn TV storyboarding as he/she designs TV campaigns as part of the overall advertising mix. Prerequisite: GRPH3130

GRPH4100 Information Design 3 cr.

This course is a hands-on study of the graphic organization and the clear and effective presentation of information as used in the corporate environment. Corporate Design involves a multi-and inter-disciplinary approach to graphic communications, combining skills and knowledge from graphic design, art history, psychology, communication theory and cultural studies. In this course, specific emphasis will be placed on the research, analysis, creation, and roll-out of a corporate identity system that includes the design and production of the corporate logo, stationary, packaging, web, signage and various collateral materials. Prerequisite: GRPH3104, GRPH3502.  (Students who need this course should take GRPH4215 or GRPH4400).

GRPH4210 Special Projects in Design 3cr.

This course allows students who wish to pursue in-depth various graphic design topics such as: theoretical, experimental or practical studies in cutting edge subjects. An advanced course for students to tackle modern or advanced ideas in design that are beyond the scope of the course offerings to create finished designs in the student’s professional interests. Course will emphasize critical thinking and originality. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design

GRPH4215 Corporate Design 3cr.

This course is a hands-on study of the graphic organization and the clear and effective presentation of information as used in the corporate environment. Corporate Design involves a multi-and inter-disciplinary approach to graphic communications, combining skills and knowledge from graphic design, art history, psychology, communication theory and cultural studies. In this course, specific emphasis will be placed on the research, analysis, creation, and roll-out of a corporate identity system that includes the design and production of the corporate logo, stationary, packaging, web, signage and various collateral materials. Prerequisite: GRPH 3130

GRPH4300 Career Internship 3 cr.

The junior or senior student is required to pursue an internship with a local professional design firm in which the student can apply his/her academic experience to the professional working environment. The student intern works under the supervision and guidance of a faculty member in partnership with the student business supervisor. Bi-weekly, on-campus meetings between the student and design advisor will assure that the student is fulfilling his/her course and business obligations. A Career Internship form is required and is available at the Registrar’s office, to be filled out for approval.  Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design

GRPH4220 Advanced Digital Photography 3 cr.

This course will offer students interested in photography and Adobe Photoshop the opportunity to advance their skills in these areas. The course will focus on the expanding field of digital photography where students will learn skills in Photoshop to create brushes, work with channels, layers, color management, filters and image retouching and manipulation. Students will create work for fine art and commercial applications. Prerequisite: GRPH2170.

GRPH4400 Advanced Topics in Design 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.

GRPH4510 Design Portfolio 3 cr.

In this course the student, working with a design faculty member, creates and produces his/her own individual portfolio which highlights the student‘s competence, knowledge, and proficiency in his/her individual chosen field or area of interest. In addition, the student will work with Becker College‘s Career Services office in the development of his/her job search strategy including creating a PPT presentation of their portfolio, using a portfolio as a marketing tool, preparing resumes and cover letters, developing interviewing skills and professional presentation techniques. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design

GRPH4520 Senior Team Project 3 cr.

The STP course involves students working together as teams with local area clients on real-world projects. Student teams will work closely and interact with their assigned client to provide graphic design, web-site design and more. Supervised by design program faculty; the teams will be responsible for the design and production of the work requested by the client. The course will focus on the skills of team management and cooperation which are essential for working on a design team. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design

GRPH4530 Professional Practices in Graphic Design 3cr.

This course is specifically focused on the student’s ability to manage their design work flow and prepare them for real business practices. Students will learn to create job tickets, calculate and prepare job estimates, fill out copyright forms, compile contracts and prepare final design bills. The class emphasizes skills necessary for working with design firms or as a self-employed graphic designer. Students will also prepare self-promotional materials, portfolio presentations and sales pitches to further prepare them for their professional careers.

H

» HIST1303 Western Civilization I Ancient and Medieval Europe 3 cr.
» HIST1304 Western Civilization II – Renaissance, Reformation and Modern Europe 3 cr.
» HIST1305 Western Civilization III Modern Europe 3 cr.
» HIST1308 U.S. History I  3 cr.
» HIST1309 U.S. History II  3 cr.
» HIST1401 World History I 3 cr.
» HIST1402 World History II 3 cr.
» HIST2306 Man and Technology in Western Civilization 3 cr.
» HIST3100 American Constitutional History 3 cr.
» HLTH1206 Medical Terminology 3 cr.
» HLTH4500 Community Health and Wellness Education Capstone 3 cr.
» HLTH4900 Internship/Independent Practicum/Practicum and Project in Community Health and Wellness Education 3 cr.
» HSTR1001 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism 3 cr.
» HSTR1100 Travel Geography 3 cr.
» HSTR1202 Restaurant and Catering Management 3 cr.
» HSTR2204 Rooms and Division Management 3 cr.
» HSTR3001 Cruise and Tour 3 cr.
» HSTR3200 Bar and Beverage Operations 3 cr.
» HSTR4900 Hospitality Field Experience 3 cr.
» HUMN1001 Introduction to the Humanities 3 cr.
» HUMN1003 Music and All That Jazz:  History and Appreciation 3 cr.
» HUMN20UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.
» HUMN2103 Global Citizenship and Community Engagement 3 cr.
» HUMN2107 America and the Contemporary World 3 cr.
» HUMN2200 Cultural  World History II 3 cr.
» HUMN2207 American Cinema 3 cr.
» HUMN2208 American Film Genres 3 cr.
» HUMN2401 Elements of Japanese Culture 3 cr. 
» HUMN2405 Religions of the World 3 cr.
» HUMN2603 Islam: Faith, Culture, and History 3 cr.
» HUMN3100 Intercultural Communication 3 cr.
» HUMN3110 Voices of the World I:  Global Cultures 3 cr.
» HUMN3120 Voices of the World II:  The American Immigrant Experience 3 cr.
» HUMN3130 Globalization and Social Justice 3 cr.
» HUMN3202 Great Trials in History 3 cr.
» HUMN3205 Detective Film: Origins and Evolution of a Genre 3 cr.
» HUMN3302 Studies in Film Analysis 3 cr.
» HUMN3502 Ancient Cultures and Their Heroes 3 cr.
» HUMN3503 Contemporary Heroes and Their Cultures 3 cr.
» HUMN3901 Global Citizenship Internship and Seminar 3 cr.
» HUMN4100 Action Research 3 cr.
» HUMN4105 Religion, Peacemaking, and Social Transformation 3 cr.
» HUMN4500 Global Citizenship Capstone Seminar I 3 cr.
» HUMN4501 Global Citizenship Capstone Seminar II 3 cr.

HIST1303 Western Civilization I Ancient and Medieval Europe 3 cr.

A survey of western man from prehistory to the end of the Medieval period. The civilizations of Egypt, the Tigris-Euphrates Valley, Greece and Rome will be emphasized in this course.

HIST1304 Western Civilization II – Renaissance, Reformation and Modern Europe 3 cr.

A survey of the history of western man from the Renaissance, through the Reformation to the end of the Thirty Years War in 1648 and thence to the present. Key topics will be the enlightenment, the age of absolute kings, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, World Wars I and II, the Vietnam War and the two wars with Iraq.

HIST1305 Western Civilization III Modern Europe 3 cr.

A survey of the history of western man from the end of the Thirty Years War in 1648 to the present. Topics will be the enlightenment, the age of the absolute kings, the French Revolution and Napoleon, the Industrial Revolution, and World Wars One and Two.

HIST1308 U.S. History I  3 cr.

A general overview of the political, social, cultural, economic and military experience of the American people from the establishment of the first settlements by Europeans in North America to the end of the American Civil war. The course will emphasize events, trends and personalities of the Colonial period, the Revolutionary, Confederation and early national era, the sectional conflict and the Civil war and Reconstruction.

HIST1309 U.S. History II  3 cr.

A general overview of the political, social, cultural, economic and military experience of the American people from the Reconstruction era to the present. The course will emphasize the events, trends and personalities of the Gilded Age and Progressive era, the two World Wars, the Roaring Twenties and Great Depression and the Cold War.

HIST1401 World History I 3 cr.

This course focuses not only on Western history but also on its diverse, non-Western counterpart. The course is designed to help students achieve a better understanding of the historical forces that shaped the development of early agrarian societies. To this end the course presents the political, economic and cultural history of various world civilizations. In addition, the course aims to increase understanding between peoples from different cultures and to create a common core-knowledge necessary for life in the emerging global community.

HIST1402 World History II 3 cr.

World History II begins by focusing on the achievements of Western technology and the voyages of discovery of the 15th century that created a new world system. The course examines European colonialism, slavery, revolutions, nationalism, liberalism, industrialization, imperialism, world wars, fascism, communism, and democracy. Other major topics include the decline of colonialism, the atomic age, and the cold war. The course also aims to increase understanding between peoples from different cultures and to create a common core-knowledge necessary for life in the emerging global community.

HIST2306 Man and Technology in Western Civilization 3 cr.

The development of technology from the fashioning of stone tools by prehistoric man to the development of a computerized society by 20th century man. Emphasis on the impact of scientific thought and technological innovation upon human social, political and economic values.

HIST3100 American Constitutional History 3 cr.

The evolution of American constitutional law is examined in detail. Topics include the writing of the Constitution, its ratification, the concept of judicial review, and the role of the Supreme Court. The development of major constitutional principles since 1787 are discussed historically. Prerequisite: GOVT1108.

HLTH1206 Medical Terminology 3 cr.

The study of anatomy and physiology provides the basic root words and concepts which, by further study of prefixes and suffixes, form a comprehensive medical vocabulary. On this foundation, a logical study of the medical specialties is made, which increases the student’s knowledge of terminology and familiarizes the student with the diagnostic procedure and treatments.  This course does NOT meet the requirment of a health education elective.

HLTH4500 Community Health and Wellness Education Capstone 3 cr.

This course focuses on the synthesis of concepts essential to the role of the community health and wellness educator.   The focus will be on the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC) Seven Areas of Responsibility for Health Educators (2010).  Students will complete the required Bachelor of Science in Community Health and Wellness Education portfolio.  Prerequisites: This course is only open to Bachelor of Science in Community Health and Wellness Education in the final semester of the program.  All of the degree major core course must be successfully completed prior to taking this course.  Students taking this course must also take the Independent Practicum in Community Health and Wellness Education as a course co-requisite.

HLTH4900 Internship/Independent Practicum/Practicum and Project in Community Health and Wellness 3 cr.

This course focuses on applying the concepts essential to the role of the community health and wellness educator.   The focus will be on the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC) Seven Areas of Responsibility for Health Educators (2010).  During the practicum experience students will evaluate health and wellness learning needs and educational programs in place for a community of interest.  Prerequisites: This course is only open to Bachelor of Science in Community Health and Wellness Education in the final semester of the program.  All of the degree major core course must be successfully completed prior to taking this course.  Students taking this course must also take the Community Health and Wellness Education Capstone course as a course co-requisite.

HSTR1001 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism 3 cr.

An orientation to the hospitality and tourism industries encompassing hotels/resorts, clubs, restaurants, food service institutions, and various elements of the tourism industry. Explores trends and opportunities in the industries; examines the planning, organizing, staffing, accounting and leadership functions in hospitality and tourism administration.

HSTR1100 Travel Geography 3 cr.

In the United States, over 70 percent of all travel sales involve itineraries originating in the United States for destinations within North America. This course will familiarize the student with the basic travel geography primarily of the United States. Major tourist destinations are reviewed with strong emphasis placed on development of map skills and basic place-name geography. Other areas of concentration will be Europe and Asia.

HSTR1202 Restaurant and Catering Management 3 cr.

This course will introduce the student to a variety of food service operations including institutional feeding, banquet planning and retail food operations. Students will explore basic nutrition, sanitation and menu management more fully.

HSTR2204 Rooms and Division Management 3 cr.

This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by detailing the flow of business through a hotel beginning with the reservation process and ending with billing and collection procedures. This course also places front office procedures within the context of the overall operation of a hotel and examines front office management, the process of handling complaints and hotel safety and security.

HSTR3001 Cruise and Tour 3 cr.

Exposes the students to the operational structure of the cruise, tour, hotel and car rental elements of the travel industry. This course will cover sales techniques relevant to these travel products. Knowledge of major tour operators and their brochures will be examined.

HSTR3200 Bar and Beverage Operations 3 cr.

This course covers cost control management within a beverage operation. Units covered will include wine and wine making, spirits and responsible alcohol service. Students will sit for a national alcohol service certification.

HSTR4900 Hospitality Field Experience 3 cr.

This experience enables the student to acquire vital hands-on training in the multifaceted hospitality industry. It is a paid work experience, which can be started in the freshman year, consisting of 300 hours in one of the many hotels, motels, resorts, restaurants and institutional facilities located across the country. Work experience report and evaluation forms are required in order to guide the student toward his/her professional goals.

HUMN1001 Introduction to the Humanities 3 cr.

Students develop analytic and critical tools for greater appreciation of the arts, such as literature, painting, music, sculpture, architecture, dance, and photography. The student reads from Faulkner, Steinbeck, Albee, Rostand, and others, and participates in limited activities to understand and appreciate man’s creative activities.

HUMN1003 Music and All That Jazz:  History and Appreciation 3 cr.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the elements of music and the primary musical periods of Western European classical music.  Additional study of other forms of music across the globe will be covered.  Students will explore modern and alternative music and the impact they have made on the human race and on music itself as it evolves through 21st Century.

Classroom time consists of lectures with discussions, Q&A, listening to musical examples, reading texts, blogs and musical journals, attending live concerts or suggested performances, and completing research papers with oral presentations specific to the course material.  We will cover brief overviews of the major composers and their music.  In addition, we will learn to read basic music symbols, and develop an appreciation and understanding of the importance of music in any culture and how it promotes a healthy and happy world view.

HUMN20UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.

HUMN2103 Global Citizenship and Community Engagement 3 cr.

This course will combine an academic study of the foundations of global citizenship with direct involvement in the experience of community outreach.  Woven into the course will be an emphasis on various skills needed in interacting with others in diverse communities.  Emphasis is on
social responsibility, civic engagement, interpersonal and leadership skills, and critical analysis appreciation for diversity.

HUMN2107 America and the Contemporary World 3 cr.

This course is intended to give students in the liberal arts an opportunity to understand the changing world, to comprehend America’s role in that world, and to ponder the political and cultural challenges that are likely to confront their generation in the future. After the end of the Cold War, certain historians such as Francis Fukuyama proclaimed the “end of history.” History, however, survived its “end” and came back as complex and disturbing as ever, which became patently clear after the tragic events of September 11th. In this course, students will get the historical background necessary to understand the developments that led to September 11th. In addition to that, they would be expected to keep in touch with the latest news on day-to-day basis.

HUMN2200 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr. – (previously ANTH3200 Cultural Anthropology)

Offers a thorough overview of the principles and processes of anthropology by looking at similarities and differences among cultures, their social and economic characteristics, customs, traditions, and beliefs. Examines how anthropology, through its distinctive methods of research, will clarify our understanding of each other and ourselves. Prerequisite: ENGL1003.

HUMN2207 American Cinema 3 cr.

The American Cinema: A survey of various trends in American movies from 1927 to present. Students will view approximately sixteen landmark motion pictures to analyze them for content, technique, mass audience appeal, and the historical context within which the film was produced.

HUMN2208 American Film Genres 3 cr.

An intensive study of one or more of the various genres of the American cinema, including westerns, musicals, film noir, gangster films, and detective films. These motion pictures will be analyzed for content, technique, mass audience appeal, and the historical, political, or sociological context within which the film was produced.

HUMN2401 Elements of Japanese Culture 3 cr.

A number of central phenomena in the Japanese cultural history are studied, from concepts of ancient aesthetics to animation styles and techniques such as anime and art forms such as manga and video games which are so much a part of modern and contemporary popular Japanese culture.  The video games, anime and manga are employed as vehicles to develop students’ awareness of Japanese culture, past and present, but particularly contemporary culture.  In addition, the contemporary image of Japan, as seen by other cultures is discussed within a framework of the history which shaped it, for example, the effect Hiroshima and World War II has had on Japanese art and culture.  Rudiments of Japanese language are also covered as required to gain a more critical understanding of various other cultural elements.  Emphasis is placed on exploring Japanese popular culture in a historical, social and literary context.  This course meets the requirements for a global awareness/diversity (Non-Western Culture) elective.

HUMN2405 Religions of the World 3 cr.

In this course, students will explore the major themes, faith practices, and symbols and concepts of the major religions: Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Islam, and Hinduism. Because religion plays a significant role in history and society, study about religion is essential to understanding both our nation and the world. The course will enhance understanding of various religions to eliminate misconceptions and to develop a healthy respect for difference. Attention will also be given to how real people, through biography and autobiography, have expressed the spiritual dimension of life through their religions traditions.

HUMN2603 Islam: Faith, Culture, and History 3 cr.

This course on Islam and the Muslim world will introduce you to the tremendous diversity of the Islamic culture and provide you with a working knowledge of the complexities and opportunities of doing business with Muslim countries. Topics include basic beliefs, practices of Islam, social, cultural, and political ideals and institutions of Islam, business risk management in the Middle East, and Islamic economics and finance. An in class discussion format will supplement readings, short analytical papers, and presentations. Understanding those who embrace Islam as a faith and a way of life will help you to become an effective global manager who will deal successfully with the Islamic world.

HUMN3100 Intercultural Communication 3 cr.

Students learn about the challenges of communication between members of two or more different cultures. Such awareness may lead to an appreciation of cultural differences and to strategies that can enhance personal and organizational functioning and communicating in a multicultural environment.

HUMN3110 Voices of the World I:  Global Cultures 3 cr.

The Voices of the World I course will expose students to nine different cultures around the world.  This course is designed to help students inhabit the intellectual and emotional worlds of people from around the world, who share our common humanity while living very different lives.  This course offers students a series of insights into different ways of thinking, through different cultural and social realities, rooted in different histories.  These insightful literary works are the best guides in developing empathy and an understanding of human differences.  Every work considered in this class will be supplemented by a short overview of the historical and cultural realities of the country that shaped both the writer and his/her work.  Prerequisite:  ENGL1003.

HUMN3120 Voices of the World II:  The American Immigrant Experience 3 cr.

The Voices of the World II course will analyze American immigrant lives through seminal historical narratives, award-winning novels, memoirs, and films.  Students will get a chance to read and compare the major 20th and 21st Century stories of uprooting, passage, and adjustments to American culture.  Students will be encouraged to recognize the narrator’s viewpoint, setting, homeland, family, gender, community, laws, and religion.  They will learn about the great saga of American immigration, be expected to read immigrant narratives and related materials, and to complete a short précis for each of the readings.  Students will watch films dealing with the lives of different ethnic diasporas within the United States.  Prerequisite:  ENGL1003.

HUMN3130 Globalization and Social Justice 3 cr.

This course focuses on the social justice issues that individuals and societies face from a global perspective, as well as the strategies employed to ameliorate the varied negative outcomes of social injustices.  Students will explore the historical antecedents, as well as the social, legal, ethical, and political events that have contributed to social injustice worldwide.  Theories of oppression and social justice will form a conceptual framework for the study of both issues and strategies.  Prerequisites:  SOCI1001 and SOCI2400.

HUMN3202 Great Trials in History 3 cr.

This course is an in-depth analysis of a selected number of important trials that have occurred throughout the history of western civilization, including the trial and execution of Socrates and Jesus Christ, the trial of Galileo, Alfred Dreyfus, Sacco and Vanzetti, John Scopes, Charles II as well as many other persons involved in civil or criminal actions that had impact on historic events. Students will study and analyze a select core of cases studied by the class as a whole, and then each student will select a smaller number of related cases for further analysis as an individual project. Prerequisite: Junior status; HIST3100 or GOVT4100 are recommended.

HUMN3205 Detective Films: Origins and Evolution of a Genre 3 cr.

Although we often view detective films as popular entertainment, the elements of detection — causality (who has done something and why?) and temporality (what happens next?) — are essential not just to cinema, but to all storytelling.  This course focuses on the origins and evolution of the detective genre in American and international films from the silent era to the present.  The course analyzes enduring works by many of the most influential Hollywood directors (Keaton, Houston, Preminger, Coppola, etc.) as well as examples from the French New Wave, Italian New Realism, Japanese Yakuza, and post-revolutionary Iran.  We shall assess these films as individual works, as responses to the conventions of genre, and as reactions to the cultural and historical eras in which they were produced (pre-Hays code, World War II, the Cold War, Vietnam, post-Watergate, etc.).  Readings include source material, genre theory, scholarly criticism, and detective fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL1003 or HUMN1001.

HUMN3302 Studies in Film Analysis 3 cr.

Studies in Film Analysis is a seminar course that will concentrate on the analysis of selected feature films that have a common theme of historical, political or literary significance. Students collectively will view approximately ten related landmark films as class assignments. Individual students will then study and analyze a smaller group of significant related films as research projects apart from the class exercises. Assessment of student learning will take the form of written analyses of the research done by students and oral presentation of their findings and conclusions. Prerequisite: Junior status; HUMN2207 or HUMN2208 recommended.

HUMN3502 Ancient Cultures and Their Heroes 3 cr.

This course will continue to examine ancient cultures from both Western and non-Western traditions. Heroes and heroines, myths, symbols, rituals, religions, and community relationships and roles will be explored. the “gifts” of these ancient cultures, clues for living better in today’s world, will be thoroughly discussed.

HUMN3503 Contemporary Heroes and Their Cultures 3 cr.

Contemporary Heroes and Their Cultures, will examine, in a timely fashion, the new relationship cultures have with their heroes, and how the culture and the hero shape one another. There is a wealth of heroism in the ever-changing world of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries as well as conflicting views on what the modern hero (and anti-hero) truly represents. New perspectives in the global community allow heroes of today to both reflect and transcend their own culture. It is, indeed, a brave new world to explore in this timely course.

HUMN3901 Global Citizenship Internship and Seminar 3 cr.

The internship is based on a service-learning model and provides students with an introduction to the experience of working with others from diverse backgrounds in a professional capacity in a community outreach setting.  Students will be required to complete 150 hours of direct service and will be monitored in their field placements.  The Seminar will be team-taught and students will meet with the instructors once per week to discuss the course readings and will have opportunity to discuss, analyze, and integrate their field placement experiences in relation to internship goals.  Real world problems of moral and ethical complexity will be addressed each week with the goal of producing scholarly response in the community.  Prerequisites:  HUMN2103 or SOCI2400.

HUMN4100 Action Research 3 cr.

This course will provide a foundation of the Action Research (AR) process through the development of a prototype and mock Web-based publication.  Students will integrate technology as they design, research, analyze, and produce the AR prototype.  Students will build and apply digital competencies using an array of course-embedded multi-media technologies in support of their research, communication, and AR prototype publication via a Web-based platform.  Students will apply the elements of AR as they maneuver through the process, preparing them for the more sophisticated AR research they will undertake during their Senior Capstone Seminars.  Prerequisites:  INFO 1001  and  MATH 2200.

 

HUMN4105 Religion, Peacemaking, and Social Transformation 3 cr.

This course will focus on portraits of global peacemakers, past and present, who have made a difference in bringing about positive change and who have been instrumental in resolving conflict or injustice through appeal to religious sentiments and cultural realities. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a service learning project relating to course content and themes. Prerequisites: SOCI1001 or SOCI2400; any HUMN3000 level course.

 

HUMN4500 Global Citizenship Capstone Seminar I 3cr.

The Global Citizenship Capstone Seminar is a two-semester course for Global Citizenship majors focused on synthesizing and deepening learning about global issues; it is designed to integrate the various aspects of students’ experiences in community and global venues.   Over the course of two semesters, students will work on a collaborative action research project with other members of the class on an issue about which they are passionate.  Projects will culminate in a globally engaged, action-oriented project by the end of the year.  Prerequisites:  HUMN 3901; HUMN 4100.

HUMN4501 Global Citizenship Capstone Seminar II 3cr.

The Global Citizenship Capstone Seminar is a two-semester course for Global Citizenship majors focused on synthesizing and deepening learning about global issues; it is designed to integrate the various aspects of students’ experiences in community and global venues.  Global competencies will be demonstrated through the completion of several writing and creative projects this spring semester, including students’ philosophy of global citizenship and their resume.  Students will also help to organize ongoing conversations with others in the class about things that are important to them and the type of future they would like to see for themselves and the world.

Over the course of this semester, students will complete their Collaborative Action Research Project in the groups determined in the fall semester.  As part of this process, students will further develop and then implement their action plan with local and/or global partners, activists, and NGOs to deepen their understanding of the chosen topics and make some kind of public contribution to the issue.  Their research projects will culminate in a community-based, globally-engaged, action-oriented project to be completed by mid-April.  Prerequisites:  Successful completion of HUMN 4500.

» INDS1306 Drafting 3 cr.
» INDS2301 Interior Design Studio I 3 cr.
» INDS2302 History of Decorative Arts I 3 cr.
» INDS2303 History of Decorative Arts II 3 cr.
» INDS2401 Interior Design Studio II 3 cr.
» INDS2402 Textiles 3 cr.
» INDS2500 Design Materials 3 cr.
» INDS3100 Introduction to CAD for Interior Design 3 cr.
» INDS3200 Advanced CAD for Interior Design 3 cr.
» INDS3300 Design Specialties Studio 3 cr.
» INDS3600 Interior Design Studio III 3 cr.
» INDS3601 ID Studio IV 3 cr.
» INDS3605 Contract Documents 3 cr.
» INDS3700 Building Systems 3 cr.
» INDS3705 Sustainable Design 3 cr.
» INDS4001 Capstone Project 3 cr.
» INDS4100 Lighting 3 cr.
» INDS4400 Advanced Topics in Interior Design 3 cr.
» INDS4530 Professional Practices in Interior Design 3 cr.
» INDS4610 Interior Design Portfolio 3 cr.
» INDS4900 Interior Design Career Internship 3 cr.
» INFO1001 Technology and Society 3 cr.
» INFO1003 Computer Applications 3 cr.
» INFO1100 Introduction to Programming 3 cr.
» INFO1300 Information Systems in Organizations 3 cr.
» INFO1400 Programming in C++ 3 cr.
» INFO2003 Advanced Computer Applications 3 cr.
» INFO2100 Internet 3 cr.
» INFO2105 Technical Aspects of E-Commerce 3 cr.
» INFO2300 Data Structures 3 cr.
» INFO2500 Data Visualization 3 cr.
» INFO3300 Business Analytics 3 cr.
» INFO3600 Networking I 3 cr.
» INFO4200 Predictive Analytics 3 cr.
» INFO4300 Big Data Analysis 4 cr.
» INFO4500 Data Science Policy and Strategic Management 3 cr.

INDS1306 Drafting 3 cr.

The basics of drafting will be covered in this class, including symbols, scale, accuracy, lettering, etc. The techniques and principles of drawing three-dimensional objects will be studied through the use of isometric drawings.

INDS2301 Interior Design Studio I 3 cr.

A presentation of the basics of balance, proportion, scale, texture, and other design elements. The development of several basic floor plans and furniture layouts as they relate to human needs will be a major area of study in this course. Prerequisite: ARTS1301 Principles of Design or INDS1306 Drafting.

INDS2302 History of Decorative Arts I 3 cr.

A survey of the history of interiors, furnishings and architectural elements. The styles of Egypt, Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Italian Renaissance, and the Hispanic, French and English (through Chippendale) periods, will be covered. There will be a field trip to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston to see many of the styles studied.

INDS2303 History of Decorative Arts II 3 cr.

This is a continuation of INDS2302 Decorative Arts I. It is a survey of the history of interiors, furnishings and architectural elements. English styles of Hepplewhite, Sheraton, and Adam will be studied. Early American, Georgian, Federal, and Victorian through contemporary American styles are studied. International styles such as Art Nouveau and Art Deco are also studied.  Prerequisite: INDS2302.

INDS2401 Interior Design Studio II 3 cr.

This course stresses the application of functional design principles as they relate to residential interiors. Two major projects will be used for analysis and research into possible solutions to design problems. Presentation is stressed.  Barrier-free design will be addressed. Prerequisite: INDS2301.

INDS2402 Textiles 3 cr.

Fibers, weaves, dyeing and production techniques, and fabric classifications are studied. Many of the applications, as they relate to interior design, are explored.

INDS2500 Design Materials 3 cr.

This course covers many of the materials used in interior design: window treatments, carpeting, flooring, wall coverings, textiles, and furniture construction basics.

INDS3100 Introduction to CAD for Interior Design 3 cr.

This is an introductory course in computer aided drafting. Many basic commands will be learned allowing the student to produce floor plans using the computer. This course stresses the architectural uses of Auto CAD. Prerequisite: INDS1306.

INDS3200 Advanced CAD for Interior Design 3 cr.

This course will build on the information gained in INDS3100. More advanced interior design plans and drawings will be developed. Three-dimensional drawings will be explained and produced. Prerequisite: INDS3100.

INDS3300 Design Specialties Studio 3 cr.

This course will examine several areas of interior design specialization.  ADA compliance, universal design, and housing for needs people/communities are topics to be explored.  Pre-requisite: INDS2401

INDS3600 Interior Design Studio III 3 cr.

Design projects will deal with space planning problems in commercial buildings such as retail stores and offices. The student will analyze and develop spatial arrangements and suggest appropriate furnishing selections. Prerequisite: INDS2401.

INDS3601 ID Studio IV 3 cr.

Larger, more advanced commercial plans are produced. Programming, design development, codes, furniture, finishes, drawings and oral presentation is stressed. Prerequisite: INDS3600.

INDS3605 Contract Documents 3 cr.

This course concentrates on establishing a complete set of construction drawings, including as-built plans, demolition plans, elevations, sections, detailed drawings, schedules, and legends.  Programming, revisions, submittals, and CSI numbering will be studied.  Pre-requisites: INDS1306, INDS3300.

INDS3700 Building Systems 3 cr.

This course covers topics such as foundations, wall, floor, and roof construction and materials, electrical plans, and flooring. Prerequisite: INDS1306.

INDS3705 Sustainable Design 3 cr.

This course examines many materials used in the built environment and their sustainability and impact on the environment.  LEED guidelines will be examined.

INDS4001 Capstone Project 3 cr. (Meets requirement of ARTS4001 Capstone for Interior Design students)

This semester-long, senior-level studio course is the culmination of the student’s Bachelor of Arts in Design experience at Becker College.  Working under the supervision of a faculty member, each student independently selects a thesis project that includes the research, development, creation and execution of a large-volume, high- quality original body of work created within the student’s area of concentration. Final presentation is to a panel of faculty and industry professionals at the conclusion of the semester. The thesis project content and its execution involves the application of previously learned studio skills and their direct relation to actual business applications. It is intended to simulate the workload and dialogue that occurs in a professional practice between designers and clients. Prerequisite: INDS3600 and INDS3601.

INDS4100 Lighting 3 cr.

Electrical plans and reflected ceiling plans are produced for residential and commercial applications. Color and psychological impact are discussed. Prerequisite: INDS1306, INDS3100.

INDS4400 Advanced Topics in Interior Design 3 cr.

This course is adapted to fit the needs of interior design students who have special interests in a particular subject.  Faculty members will develop the curriculum based on the students’ needs and/or the faculty’s particular interest.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.

INDS4530 Professional Practices in Interior Design 3 cr.

This course examines business practices, ethics, and procedures for interior designers.  Emphasis will be placed on many of the business forms used in running a design firm.  Letters of agreement, time management, budget proposals, and fee structures will be analyzed.  Working with other design professionals, such as architects, contractors, and supplies, will also be examined.  Pre-requisite: INDS3600.

INDS4610 Interior Design Portfolio 3 cr. (Meets requirement of ARTS4100 Design Portfolio for Interior Design students)

In this course the student, working with a design faculty member, creates and produces his/her own individual portfolio which highlights the student’s competence, knowledge, and proficiency in his/her individual chosen field or area of interest. In addition, the student will work with Becker College’s Career Services office in the development of his/her job search strategy including creating a PPT presentation of their portfolio, using a portfolio as a marketing tool, preparing resumes and cover letters, developing interviewing skills and professional presentation techniques. Prerequisite: 90 credits of completed design course work.

INDS4900 Interior Design Career Internship 3 cr. (Meets requirement of ARTS4500 Career Internship for Interior Design students)

In Internship is an opportunity for the student to work with professionals in the field of interior design.  Keeping a journal of the daily business procedures along with the creative endeavors in a firm can be greatly beneficial to the student.  Prerequisites:  INDS3300 and INDS3600.

INFO1001 Technology and Society 3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to develop a higher level of student awareness of the social, legal and ethical issues related to the role of technology in society today. The role that technology plays both personally and professionally will be examined, with a focus on issues related to computer use, such as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, ethics, health, and the environment. A look at emerging technologies and the PC of the future is also included.

INFO1003 Computer Applications 3 cr.

This course is designed to be an introduction to professional business application software in the areas of spreadsheets and databases.

INFO1100 Introduction to Programming - see CPTR1100 Computer Programming I

INFO1300 Information Systems in Organizations

This course serves as an introduction to the broad field of Information Technology, focusing on three major areas: project management, computer security and informatics and on the management of these technologies  to support and achieve strategic organizational goals.  Other significant areas of IT management will also be explored.  Students will evaluate through discussions and written assignments how each of these areas apply to current and future business decisions.  The course will use case-based tutorials in order re-enforce concepts with technology skills in completing realistic assignments.  Prerequisites: none

INFO1400 Programming in C++ - see CPTR1400 Programming in C++

INFO2003 Advanced Computer Applications 3 cr.

Students will use the advanced features of spreadsheets and databases in business applications. Prerequisite: INFO1003.

INFO2100 Internet 3 cr.

Study of one of the fastest growing and popular areas in computing today. The purpose of the course is to give a fuller understanding of what the Internet is, how it works, and how the uses of it are changing. Students will cover the history, the terminology, its primary features, and be able to discuss the problems and possible future of this topic. Students will develop their own home page. Prerequisite: INFO1001.

INFO2105 Technical Aspects of E-Commerce 3 cr.

This course will explore the business and technological elements of electronic commerce.  It will explain the economic foundations of electronic commerce, describe the infrastructure, and explain the main technologies used to implement online business activities.  Prerequisite:  INFO1001.

INFO2300 Data Structures 3 cr. – see CPTR2300 Data Structures

INFO2500 Data Visualization 3 cr.

Information visualization is a combination of many disciplines.  Principles are drawn from the fields of statistics, perception, graphic design, cognitive psychology, information design, communications, and data mining.  This course is an introduction to the principles and techniques for data visualization, and will cover the basic theories of data visualization, such as data types, chart types, visual variables, visualization techniques, structure of data visualization, navigation in data visualization, color theory, cognitive theory, and visualization evaluation.  Students will learn visual representation methods and techniques that increase the understanding of complex data and models.  Emphasis will be placed on the identification of patterns, trends, and differences from data sets across categories, space, and time.  The ways that humans process and encode visual and textual information will be discussed in relation to selecting the appropriate method for the display of quantitative and qualitative data.  Graphical methods for specialized data types (time series, categorical, etc.) will be presented.  Topics will include charts, tables, graphics, effective presentations, multimedia content, animation, and dashboard design.  Examples and cases from a variety of industries will be used.  In this course, we will explore visual representation methods and techniques that increase our understanding of complex data.  Prerequisites:  None.

INFO3300 Business Analytics 3 cr.

This course provides an overview of the field of analytics, which has been defined as the extensive use of data, quantitative analysis, exploratory or predictive models, and fact-based management to drive decisions and actions.  The development and use of data warehouses and data marts to support business analytics is discussed. The use of key performance indicators, dashboards and scorecards for performance management and opportunity assessment are addressed.  Text and web mining are discussed, and the application of selected data mining techniques to business decision making situations is illustrated.  Students actively participate in the delivery of this course through application assignments and project presentations. Prerequisite:  INFO1003 and MATH2200.

INFO3600 Networking I 3 cr. – see CPTR3600 Networking I

INFO4200 Predictive Analytics 3 cr.

This course explores statistical models as they are used in predictive analytics. The course will focus on applying predictive models through cases studies of consumer behavior, crime fighting, financial risk, life sciences, medical risk, and organizational efficiency.  The course reviews traditional linear and generalized linear models, including multiple regression, logistic regression, and survival data models.  It addresses issues of model selection and specification, as well as best practices in developing models for business, life sciences, and other industries. Prerequisite: MATH3200.

INFO4300 Big Data Analysis 4 cr.

The course will discuss data mining and machine learning algorithms for analyzing Big Data.  A lab component of industry standard software will emphasize tools for creating parallel algorithms that can process very large amounts of data.  This course will provide a review of basic linear algebra and probability. Lectures will cover techniques of mining large data sources from areas such as social media, web advertising, and life sciences, and will provide opportunities to apply best practices in big data analysis.  Prerequisite: CPTR1400, MATH2105, and MATH2200 or appropriate math placement score.

INFO4500 Data Science Policy and Strategic Management 3 cr.

A capstone course for the application of learning to projects and/or issues in various industries related to large data repositories or data streams.  A semester long project provides a framework to evaluate a data science problem requiring the integration of computer science, statistics, and another discipline of student focus (e.g., Bioinformatics, Business Analytics, Healthcare Analytics, etc.).  Projects require a portfolio with written assessments of the industry or organization selected, an overview of the data science problem, a data management and analysis plan, sample data, data visualizations, and conclusions.  Prerequisite: INFO4300 Big Data Analysis.

J

» JOUR2901 Journalism Internship 1 cr.
» JPNS1001 Japanese Language I  4 cr.
» JPNS1002 Japanese Language II  4 cr.
» JUST1100 Criminal Justice System & Process 3 cr.
» JUST1101 Homeland, Private & Public Security 3 cr.
» JUST1105 Juvenile Justice System & Process 3 cr.
» JUST2202 Crisis Intervention in Criminal Justice 3 cr.
» JUST2203 Corrections, Systems & Process 3 cr.
» JUST2204 Victimology & Victim Services 3 cr.
» JUST2207 Police and the Community 3 cr.
» JUST2209 Probation and Parole 3 cr.
» JUST2800 History of Modern Terrorism  3 cr.
» JUST2801 Key Issues in International Terrorism  3 cr.
» JUST2802 Terror Group Aims, Motivations and Beliefs  3 cr.
» JUST3001 Police Administration and Management 3 cr.
» JUST3100 Threat Assessment and Management 3 cr.
» JUST3200 Criminal Procedure and Evidence 3 cr.
» JUST3801 Terrorist Modus Operandi  3 cr.
» JUST3802 Future and Emerging Trends in Terrorism  3 cr.
» JUST3803 Cyberterrorism  3 cr.
» JUST3900 Criminal Justice Internship 3 cr.
» JUST3901 Policing/Law Enforcement Internship 3 cr.
» JUST4001 Research in Criminal Justice 3 cr.
» JUST4100 Directed Study in Criminal Justice and Legal Studies 3 cr.
» JUST4800 Counterterrorism Policy, Research and Management Capstone 3 cr.

 

JOUR2901 Journalism Internship 1 cr.

Students will serve on the Becker Journal staff and be fully involved in producing the student newspaper. They will work in and be evaluated on the basis of the following areas: reporting, interviewing techniques, news writing, editorial writing, editing, journalistic ethics, photo-copy layout, ad creating, and advertising-marketing.  This course may be taken multiple times for credit.  Prerequisites: ENGL1001 or equivalent.

JPNS1001 Japanese Language I  4 cr.

This course introduces basic grammar, sentence patterns and vocabulary of the Japanese language.  In this course the emphasis is on oral skills.  The course entails three hours of lecture and two hours of lab.  The course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Japanese.

JPNS1002 Japanese Language II  4 cr.

This course follows up on the work of JPNS 1001 in that students will continue to improve their mastery of grammar, sentence patterns and vocabulary of the Japanese language and will continue to improve their oral skills.  Additionally, students will begin to develop their understanding of the Japanese language as well as their reading and writing skills in Japanese.  The course entails three hours of lecture and two hours of lab.  Prerequisite: JPNS1001

JUST1100 Criminal Justice System & Process 3 cr.

A survey of the various agencies of justice, from administrative, historical and social viewpoints. Acquaints students with the broad field of criminal justice and provides a foundation for successive, more specialized courses.

JUST1101 Homeland, Private & Public Security 3 cr. (Previously ENFO1101 Homeland, Private & Public Security)

Examines the historical background, organization and administration of private security. Emphasis will be placed on the study of different types of security programs and the relationship between private security agencies and public government agencies.

JUST1105 Juvenile Justice System & Process 3 cr.

A study of the underlying philosophy and the processes used in the juvenile justice system. The course emphasizes the difference between adult and juvenile procedure.

JUST2202 Crisis Intervention in Criminal Justice 3 cr.

A study of the theoretical and practical basis for accurately assessing and responding to crisis situations unique to the criminal justice profession. Subject areas will include domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, and elder abuse. Communication and referral techniques will be covered and emphasized throughout the course.

JUST2203 Corrections, Systems & Process 3 cr. (Previously CORR2203 Community Corrections)

Corrections is a growing and changing component of our criminal justice system.  It includes collaboration between the courts, correctional facilities, and community-based alternatives.  This course will explore the various corrections systems in the U.S., at Federal, State and local levels, and the process by which they operate.  It will include the historical/social background of corrections and the future directions corrections may be headed in.

JUST2204 Victimology & Victim Services 3 cr.

This course examines the foundations and historical background of victimology, the victim’s rights movement and victim’s services. New developments in the field of victim assistance will be examined. Specific subject areas of victimization will be studied, including homicide, rape, and helping the helpers (victims’ service providers). Throughout the course, current literature and documents on victim’s rights and services for the 21st century will be emphasized and studied. Course is especially appropriate for Criminal Justice, Legal Studies, and Psychology majors.

JUST2207 Police and the Community 3 cr. (Previously ENFO2207 Police and the Community)

The function of the police in the community and the interaction between the community and the police will be analyzed. Aspects of police operations and their corresponding influence to the community will be examined and discussed. The relationship of police, media, minority groups, special populations and those in political power will be among the topic areas to be studied. An emphasis on “Community Policing” will be maintained throughout the course. Prerequisite: JUST1100 or permission of the instructor.

JUST2209 Probation and Parole 3 cr. (Previously CORR2209 Probation and Parole)

A survey of correctional systems with regard to the regulations and practices of probation and central presentence investigation, supervision, and release of probationers. The philosophies which influenced parole procedures and treatment of criminals are also studied.

JUST2800 History of Modern Terrorism  3 cr.

This course will look at 19th century through to modern day terror organizations, such as the European Anarchist movement, US abolitionists movement, Irish National Brotherhood.  This history provides the foundation for further study of terrorism.

JUST2801 Key Issues in International Terrorism  3 cr.

This course examines the fundamental issues behind terrorism and the current responses to this threat. It explores the concept of terrorism, the types of terrorism and prominent terrorist groups. In addition it evaluates the international measures to curb terrorism and explores the role of business and media sectors in countering terrorist activities.  Prerequisite: JUST2800.

JUST2802 Terror Group Aims, Motivations and Beliefs  3 cr.

What motivates terrorists? Understanding the terrorist mind-set is critical to countering terrorism effectively. This course enhances a participant’s analytical ability by identifying the various strains of influence within today’s terrorist groups and networks. Prerequisite: JUST2800.

JUST3001 Police Administration and Management 3 cr. (Previously ENFO3001 Police Administration and Management)

Students are introduced to the managerial structure and functions of the many levels of police departments. The relationship of police departments to other agencies of law enforcement is also studied. Prerequisite:  JUST2207

JUST3100 Threat Assessment and Management 3 cr.

This course will introduce students to the concept of threats, how they are analyzed and assessed, and the techniques and methodologies for managing them.  Concepts from a number of disciplines will be covered, with a primary goal of violent prediction and a secondary goal of practical applications of case management.  Prerequisites:  PSYC1001 and JUST1100.

JUST3200 Criminal Procedure and Evidence 3 cr. (Previously ENFO3200 Criminal Procedure and Evidence)

The relationship to the criminal justice system of the 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments and Supreme Court decisions. The law of arrest, search and seizure, questioning, confessions, entrapment, etc. will be covered from a legal and practical standpoint. A research paper is required.

JUST3801 Terrorist Modus Operandi  3 cr.

This course explores how the ideologies of various terrorist groups can have an impact on group structure, tactics, strategies and target selection. It examines types of terrorist tactics, looking into the role of ideology and the impact of state response on the evolution of terrorist strategies, before considering the possible future trends in terrorist tactics Prerequisite  JUST2800, JUST2801, JUST2802.

JUST3802 Future and Emerging Trends in Terrorism  3 cr.

This course examines the future and emerging trends in terrorism, looking at how state and local terror organizations may impact society in the future. Prerequisite  JUST3801.

JUST3803 Cyberterrorism  3 cr.

This course examines the concept of cyberterrorism and provides an introduction to the ways in which terrorists use the Internet and the politics of cybersecurity. It offers simplified explanations of the technology of the Internet and major types of cyberattack, with the aim of assisting students to gain a concrete sense of the issues that are under discussion. Note that the module does not provide a technical grounding in cybersecurity. Prerequisites JUST3801 or JUST3802.

JUST3900 Criminal Justice Internship 3 cr.

Students will work within criminal justice agencies, integrating classroom learning with practical experience. In a addition, students will meet periodically with the internship coordinator to review their progress, and relate their experiences to broader issues within criminal justice. The e-learning platform, Canvas ©, will also be used to provide discussion and communication with the student. A minimum of 144 hours is required. Prerequisites: Completion of all 1st and 2nd year courses, a GPA of 2.5, and permission of the internship coordinator.

JUST3901 Policing/Law Enforcement Internship 3 cr.

Students will work in a police/law enforcement agency, integrating classroom learning with practical experience.  In addition, students will meet periodically with the internship coordinator to review their progress, and relate their experiences to broader issues within policing.  The e-learning platform, Canvas©, will also be used to provide discussion and communication with the student.  A minimum of 144 hours is required.  Prerequisites:  Completion of all 1st and 2nd year courses, a cumulative GPA of 2.5, and permission of the internship instructor.

JUST4001 Research in Criminal Justice 3 cr.

The course provides an introduction to the practice of research in criminal justice and criminology. Students learn the logic of scientific inquiry and social research methods as they design a research project. A formal research proposal is presented and defended at the end of the semester.  Prerequisites:  SOCI1001 & PSYC1001.

JUST4100 Directed Study in Criminal Justice and Legal Studies 3 cr.

Students conduct the research project proposed in JUST4001 – Research in Criminal Justice. A paper, taking the form of a journal article and reporting the results of the research, is presented and defended at the end of the semester. Special attention is given to the project’s relationship to ongoing research and theory building in the fields of criminal justice and criminology. Prerequisite: JUST4001.

JUST4800 Counterterrorism Policy, Research and Management Capstone 3 cr.

This capstone course is the culmination of the related courses in the Domestic Counter Terrorism Studies: Policy, Response and Management Concentration. Students will review and study current research and policy as it relates to counter terrorism, and management practice, in the U.S. today. A semester long project will be assigned on an individual and group/team basis, which will result in a practical/table-top exercise and final presentation at the end of the semester.  Prerequisites:   JUST2800, JUST2801, JUST2802, JUST3100, JUST4001.

L

» LGLS1100 Introduction to Law 3 cr.
» LGLS1103 Real Estate Law 3 cr.
» LGLS1207 Contracts and Uniform Commercial Code 3 cr.
» LGLS2102 Criminal Law 3 cr.
» LGLS2105 Estates, Trusts and Estate Administration 3 cr.
» LGLS2107 Family Law 3 cr.
» LGLS2200 Corporation Law 3 cr.
» LGLS2203 Litigation 3 cr.
» LGLS2205 Legal Aspects of Business 3 cr.
» LGLS2208 Legal Research Techniques 3 cr.
» LGLS2300 Legal Research and Writing Techniques 3 cr.
» LGLS2600 Computer Applications for the Legal Profession 3 cr.
» LGLS2900 Career Internship 3 cr.
» LGLS2909 Cooperative Education for Paralegal Studies 3 cr.
» LGLS3001 Advanced Legal Writing and Analysis 3 cr.
» LGLS3200 Topics in Law and Society 3 cr.
» LGLS3205 Business Law 3 cr.
» LGLS3292 Conflict Resolution 3 cr.
» LGLS4001 Advanced Civil Litigation 3 cr.
» LGLS4100 Directed Legal Study 3 cr.
» LIBA4100 Senior Seminar in the Liberal Arts 3 cr.

LGLS1100 Introduction to Law 3 cr.

An overview of the legal assistant’s responsibilities, this course surveys legal materials, law office functions, interviewing skills, and familiarizes the student with the psychology of law offices and the preparation and processing of legal documents for civil action in court.

LGLS1103 Real Estate Law 3 cr.

An analysis of real estate transfer, including basic concepts in the ownership of real property, the correlation of real estate and estate law, purchase and sale agreement forms, preparation of sample mortgage and note forms, concepts and practice in calculation of tax adjustments, deed preparation and title examination practice. Prerequisite: LGLS1100.

LGLS1207 Contracts and Uniform Commercial Code 3 cr.

This course will deal extensively with the fundamentals of contract law and how contract law interacts with the Uniform Commercial Code. Students will learn through case studies and application of the principals discussed.

LGLS2102 Criminal Law 3 cr.

Students study the basic concepts of criminal law. The history of law and classification of offenses, sentences, culpability and defenses are included.

LGLS2105 Estates, Trusts and Estate Administration 3 cr.

This course deals with the techniques and procedures involved in the preparation of wills and trusts along with the probating of estates and estate accounting. Students will deal with issues such as estate planning, income, gift and inheritance taxes and other issues associated with the planning and probating of an estate.

LGLS2107 Family Law 3 cr.

This course will deal with the concepts and procedures involved in domestic relations law. Students will study issues such as divorce, separate support, abuse prevention, guardianships, power of attorney, and parental rights.

LGLS2200 Corporation Law 3 cr.

Provides skills in preparation of forms of articles of incorporation, bylaws, minutes, procedures for verifying and reserving corporate name, knowledge of drafting resolutions, such as those affecting the payment of dividends, mergers and consolidations, the termination of a business, and the distribution of its property to creditors and shareholders. Prerequisite: LGLS1100.

LGLS2203 Litigation 3 cr.

The study of a civil proceeding from the service of process to final judgment, to include domestic law, debt collection, and torts. Prerequisite: LGLS1100.

LGLS2205 Legal Aspects of Business 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide a survey of the legal environment from the perspective of professional service and business employment responsibilities. The areas studied include personal injury law, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, partnership law, secured transactions, bankruptcy, and property law. The intent of the course is to familiarize students with questions and issues that arise in everyday business life.

LGLS2208 Legal Research Techniques 3 cr.

Stresses the importance of a thorough knowledge of legal terminology and emphasis on legal research and writing. The course will include case studies. Prerequisite: LGLS1100.

LGLS2300 Legal Research and Writing Techniques 3 cr.

A systematic approach to learning legal analysis, organization and writing. Cases are introduced in detail and with concentration on issues, rules, holdings and reasoning. Students develop their writing abilities with specific focus on the preparation of briefs and memoranda and the analysis of legal problems.

LGLS2600 Computer Applications for the Legal Profession 3 cr.

This course provides the student with a foundation of computer concepts and their application in the legal profession.

LGLS2900 Career Internship 3 cr.

Arrangements are made for students to gain practical experience by working within a selected legal environment.

LGLS2909 Cooperative Education for Paralegal Studies 3 cr.

This program places students in work experiences which may include legal offices, real estate, and insurance establishments. A minimum of 144 hours is required. Open to sophomores either fall or spring semester. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA.

LGLS3001 Advanced Legal Writing and Analysis 3 cr.

Students will engage in extensive appellate writing and research. They will develop a working knowledge of all of the documents associated with appellate practice and the skills necessary for effective appellate brief preparation. Prerequisites: LGLS2300 or LGLS2208.

LGLS3200 Topics in Law and Society 3 cr.

This course examines the historical and philosophical origins of the law, the sociological impact of the law, the effects of the law on the political process and public policy, and an analysis of the importance of law
within our increasingly pluralistic society.  Students will explore, discuss and evaluate the legal implications of current events in the world in a variety of areas.  Prerequisites:  ENGL1001, SOCI1001, PSYC1001.

LGLS3205 Business Law 3 cr.

This course focuses on the practical implications of living in our highly regulated society. Emphasis is on how to protect yourself and your company from possible liability. Topics include Torts, Intellectual Property, Cyber Law and e-Commerce, Contracts, Agency and Legal Reasoning.

LGLS3292 Conflict Resolution 3 cr.

Conflict arises when people working together have different ideas about how to achieve desired objectives. Most conflict can be traced back to element of uncertainty. Negotiation is one of the best ways to manage the risks that result from uncertainty. This course will examine the nature of negotiation as a means of resolving conflict and minimizing risks. The course will explore negotiation skills such as: (1) separate the people from the problem, (2) use objective date, (3) focus on interests, not positions, and, (4) determine mutually acceptable options. The goal of any negotiation process is to arrive to a win-win solution.

LGLS4001 Advanced Civil Litigation 3 cr.

Students will be exposed to the elements of complex litigation with emphasis on the preparation of litigation documents, detailed discovery and a working knowledge of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Prerequisite: LGLS2203.

LGLS4100 Directed Legal Study 3 cr.

This is an independent study which will allow a student to extensively research a topic of the student’s choice. The research paper will involve the application of statutory and common-law sources along with the use of the student’s writing and analytical abilities (senior status).

LIBA4100 Senior Seminar in the Liberal Arts 3 cr.

This capstone course will serve as a culminating academic experience for senior students in Liberal Arts.  Students will be expected to demonstrate mastery of research methodology and skills at a level consistent with graduate school expectations.  In this semester students will be provided a reading list in six areas of the Humanities:  Art, History, Government, Philosophy, Documentary Film, and Literature.  Humanities faculty will present lectures in each of these areas; tied into each lecture will be a significant related critical theory as well.  Each student will select an area in which he or she wishes to develop a capstone research writing project and will submit a description of such project to the Liberal Arts Advisory Committee for approval.

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» MATF1001 Foundations of College Mathematics 3 cr.
» MATF1002 Math for Health Sciences 3 cr.
» MATH1010 Elementary Math Subtest MTEL General Curriculum Concepts 1 cr.
» MATH1200 College Algebra 3 cr.
» MATH1300 Contemporary Topics in Math 3 cr.
» MATH1301 Contemporary Mathematics for Managers 3 cr.
» MATH2001 Functions and Pre-calculus 3 cr.
» MATH2005 Geometry 3 cr.
» MATH2105 Finite Math 3 cr.
» MATH2200 Statistics 3 cr.
» MATH2202 Calculus 3 cr.
» MATH2302 Calculus II 3 cr.
» MATH2400 Discrete Math 3 cr.
» MATH3200 Multivariate Statistics 3 cr.
» MATH3305 Linear Algebra 3 cr.
» MATH3700 Quantitative Methods in Management 3 cr.
» MATH30UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.
» MGMT1000 Introduction to Business 3 cr.
» MGMT1805 Introduction to Project Management  3 cr.
» MGMT2200 Principles of Management and Leadership 3 cr.
» MGMT2300 Portfolio Class (Required to open a Portfolio) 2 cr.
» MGMT2500 Small Business Management 3 cr.
» MGMT2505 Small Business Entrepreneurship 3 cr.
» MGMT2606 The Business of Screenwriting 3 cr.
» MGMT2801 Fundamentals of Farm and Stable Management
» MGMT2805 Project Planning & Control  3 cr.
» MGMT2900 Career Internship 3 cr.
» MGMT3100 International Business 3 cr.
» MGMT3190 Communications Strategies & Techniques for Managers 4 cr.
» MGMT3200 Financial Management 3 cr.
» MGMT3205 Organizational Behavior 3 cr.
» MGMT3290 Human Behavior in Organizations 3 cr.
» MGMT3300 Contemporary Economics 3 cr.
» MGMT3400 Human Resource Management 3 cr.
» MGMT3490 Accounting for Managers 3 cr.
» MGMT3500 Finance for Managers 3 cr.
» MGMT3600 Management Decision Making and Problem Solving 3 cr.
» MGMT3705 Business Ethics & Social Responsibility 3 cr.
» MGMT3800 Management Information Systems 3 cr.
» MGMT3805 Project Team Management  3 cr.
» MGMT3806 Influence, Decision Making and Problem Solving in Project Management  3 cr.
» MGMT3890 Managing Diversity in the Changing Workplace 3 cr.
» MGMT3950 Junior Seminar 3 cr.
» MGMT3960 Budget & Performance Measurement 3 cr.
» MGMT4000 Business Research Methods 3 cr.
» MGMT4100 Business Policy and Strategy 3 cr.
» MGMT4105 Project Management: Tools & Techniques 4 cr.
» MGMT4190 Statistical Techniques for Managers 3 cr.
» MGMT4195 Leadership, Communication and Change 3 cr.
» MGMT4200 Training and Development 3 cr.
» MGMT4201 Compensation and Benefits 3 cr.
» MGMT4300 Managing in the Global Economy 3 cr.
» MGMT4400 Current Issues in Strategic Planning 3 cr.
» MGMT4600 Capstone: Becoming a Reflective Practitioner 3 cr.
» MGMT4805 Project Management Capstone  3 cr.
» MGMT4900 Career Internship 3 cr.
» MGMT4950 Senior Seminar
» MKTG2101 Advertising 3 cr.
» MKTG2104 Principles of Marketing 3 cr.
» MKTG3001 Marketing Management 3 cr.
» MKTG3005 Consumer Behavior 3 cr.
» MKTG3105 Global Marketing 3 cr.
» MKTG3300 Customer Engagement 3 cr.
» MKTG4001 Marketing Research 3 cr.
» MKTG4105 International Marketing 3 cr.
» MKTG4200 Retail Marketing 3 cr.
» MKTG4300 Marketing Seminar 3 cr.
» MKTG4400 Advanced Topics in Marketing 3 cr.

MATF1001 Foundations of College Mathematics 3 cr. (non-graduation credit)

This foundational math course is designed to provide the student the opportunity to review all basic arithmetic concepts necessary to succeed in other math courses. In addition, the student is taught ways to combat math anxiety that may have hindered success in math in the past.

MATF1002 Math for Health Sciences 3 cr. (non-graduation credit)

The Math for Health Sciences course is designed to provide mastery of the fundamental mathematical concepts related to nursing, which are also germane to the field of veterinary technology. Students will begin with a review of basic mathematical and selected algebraic concepts and progress to application of those skills in nursing and veterinary mathematics. The importance of correct dosage calculations and the ramification of errors will be emphasized. Material will be presented in a variety of formats similar to those encountered in the practice of nursing and veterinary medicine.

MATH1010 Elementary Math Subtest MTEL General Curriculum Concepts 1 cr.

This is a 15 hour course that will cover the topics on the Elementary Math Subtest Massachusetts MTEL General Curriculum with emphasis on improving problem-solving skills and developing the deep conceptual understanding that is the key to success. Students will learn the most efficient ways to solve various types of problems.

MATH1200 College Algebra 3 cr.

The topics covered include properties of number systems, polynomials, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, radical equations, absolute value equations, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing and verbal problems. Prerequisite: C or better in MATF1001 or MATF1002, or appropriate placement score.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation from the Veterinary Technology program.

MATH1300 Contemporary Topics in Math 3 cr.

Designed for the Liberal Arts and Education majors. Topics will include the following: set theory, logic, numeration systems, number theory, operations with the real numbers, mathematical systems, geometry, counting methods, probability and statistics, consumer mathematics and computer functions.  This course does NOT meet the prerequisite requirements for any 2000 level math course.

MATH1301 Contemporary Mathematics for Managers 3 cr.

Review and advance the student’s mathematical abilities so that they are able to work with the most essential mathematical techniques for use in business and other workplace situations. Emphasis is placed on using basic algebraic methods to represent the mathematics inherent in these situations, and in solving simple equations.

MATH2001 Functions and Pre-calculus 3 cr.

This course incorporates algebra, the basics of trigonometry and a review of geometry and will serve as a foundation for the study of physics, biomechanics and exercise physiology. Students will learn to solve algebraic equations and to apply them to word problems dealing with time, rate and distance. Students will also study logarithmic and exponential functions, tangents, cosine and sine, vectors, forces. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH1200 or appropriate placement score.

MATH2005 Geometry 3 cr.

This course covers elements of Euclidian and Non-Euclidian geometry. It highlights geometrical figures properties, relationships, and transformations. It emphasizes geometry structure: axioms, theorems, propositions; and concentrates mainly on proofs build using this structure. Topics include the introduction of coordinates, the theory of area, history of the parallel postulate, the various non-Euclidean geometries, compass and ruler constructions. Prerequisites:  C or better in MATH1200.

MATH2105 Finite Math 3 cr.

This intermediate level mathematics course includes an introduction to logic, sets and counting, functions, matrix theory, linear systems, linear programming, game theory, and an introduction to probability.  With a focus on quantitative reasoning, the students’ ability to interpret mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables, and schematics is developed, as well as the ability to draw inferences from them.  The representation of mathematical information in various formats is developed, as is the ability to use formal logical theorems and mathematical methods to solve problems, determine reasonableness, identify alternatives, and select optimal results.  Prerequisite: C or better in MATH1200 or appropriate placement.

MATH2200 Statistics 3 cr.

An introductory course for students having backgrounds limited to precalculus mathematics. Areas treated are statistical methods, sampling, probability, frequency distributions, estimations, correlation and tests of significance. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH1200 or appropriate placement score.

MATH2202 Calculus 3 cr.

Designed for students entering the fields of business and economics. Topics include algebra review, functions, mathematical modeling, limits and continuity, differentiation, the chain rule, application of the derivative for: maximum and minimum in profit inventory costs and production, elasticity for demand, the antiderivative and integration. Prerequisite: MATH2001 Precalculus or appropriate placement score.

MATH2302 Calculus II 3 cr.

This course is devoted to the study of  transcendental functions, techniques and applications of integration, sequences, series, power series with applications, and parametric equations and  polar coordinates. In particular, applications include area bounded by curves, volume by rotating and slicing, arc length and area of a surface of revolution. Integration techniques taught  include integration by parts, partial fractions, trigonometric substitution, numerical integration, and  improper  integrals. Students will be introduced to hyperbolic functions, separable and linear differential equations, direction fields, and their applications. The study of sequences and infinite series will include tests for convergence of the various types of series, leading to power series and Taylor series. Applications to Economics and Biology will be discussed.  Prerequisite:  MATH2001.

MATH2400 Discrete Mathematics 3 cr.

This course covers elementary discrete mathematics essential for computer science and informatics courses.  It emphasizes mathematical definitions and proofs, as well as applicable methods.  Topics include formal logic notation, proof methods, induction, well ordering, sets, relations, elementary graph theory, integer congruences, functions and relations, permutations and combinations, counting principles, and discrete probability.  Further selected topics may also be covered, such as recursive definition and structural induction, state machines and invariants, recurrences, and generating functions.  Prerequisite:  MATH2302.

MATH30UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.

MATH3200 Multivariate Statistics 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of multivariate statistics.  The focus is on the appropriate use and interpretation of a variety of multivariate statistics using software (SPSS). The topics include a variety of multivariate techniques, particularly linear regression, binary logistic regression, discriminant analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, repeated measures analysis, and factor analysis. The course concentrates on providing students with knowledge of statistical analyses (obtained from SPPS) that can be properly used to address a specific research question. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH2200 or appropriate placement score.

MATH3305 Linear Algebra 3 cr.

Topics include systems of linear equations, Row Reduction and Echelon Forms, Matrices and Matrix Algebra, Inverse Matrices, Determinants and Permutations; Cramer Rule, Vector Spaces and Subspaces, Linear Transformations, Matrix of a Linear Transformation; Linear Independence, Bases for Vector Spaces, Dimension, Matrix Rank, Inner Products (dot products), Orthogonality, Cross Products, Gram Schmidt Method; Eigenvectors, Eigenvalues, Eigenspaces of a Matrices, Matrix Diagonalization, Polar Coordinate Systems, especially 3D polar space, 4×4 Matrices and Perspective Projection, Rotations in 3 dimensions including Euler Angels.  Some applications of linear algebra will be discussed, such as computer graphics and linear regression (least squares).  Prerequisites and Requirements:  MATH2202 or MATH2105, with a grade of C or better.  This course is highly recommended for majors in sciences especially computer-science oriented majors.

MATH3700 Quantitative Methods in Management 3 cr.

Quantitative procedures used to study underlying structure of decision-making problems in business and industry. Topics include linear programming, simulation, project management and inventory control as well as limitations of the management science methodology. Prerequisites: MATH1200 and MATH2200.

MGMT1000 Introduction to Business 3 cr.

This course is about principles of the business sector of our society. Students are exposed to the areas of business and its environment, legal forms of business ownership and operations of business. Emphasis is on the interrelationships of managing human resources, marketing, production, financing, and control aspects of business. Business-government relations, small business management and franchising and career opportunities in the field of business are explored.

MGMT1805 Introduction to Project Management  3 cr.

This class focuses on the factors necessary for successful project management.  Topics include project management concepts, needs identification, the project manager, teams, project organizations, project communications, project planning, scheduling, control and cost performance.

MGMT2200 Principles of Management and Leadership 3 cr.

This course sets forth the basic functions of management and the role of a manager from an operational as well as from an environmental viewpoint. Guiding principles and practices which increase management effectiveness are analyzed.

MGMT2300 Portfolio Class (Required to open a Portfolio) 2 cr.

Taking a step back and analyzing who you are and what makes you tick are the main focuses of the Portfolio class. Why do you do the things that you do; think the things that you think; feel the ways that you feel? How have you become the person that you are today? The Portfolio class meets for ½ day on Saturday and concentrates on analysis of prior life experience necessary for the development of the portfolio and the creation of your autobiography. Students will also learn how to document professional training and develop experiential learning essays using the Kolb Model. Students will have eight weeks after the class to complete their autobiographies and portfolios.

MGMT2500 Small Business Management 3 cr.

This course is about the principles and practices necessary to the formulation of a small business. Sole proprietorships, partnerships, and small corporations are considered. Aspects of insurance, inventory funding, employee relationships, and legal matters are studied.

MGMT2505 Small Business Entrepreneurship 3 cr.

This course will allow students to understand and evaluate small businesses from potential ownership perspective. Topics include starting vs. buying a small business, developing a business plan, financial aspects of the business, legal and licensing requirements, franchises as alternative, and revenue/value creation.

MGMT2606 The Business of Screenwriting 3 cr.

This course will discuss the business of screenwriting, from how to market yourself to networking in the industry. The course will be taught by current industry professionals, ranging from writers, talent managers, and film producers. Prerequisites: ENGL2604, ENGL2605.

MGMT2801 Fundamentals of Farm and Stable Management – see EQST2801 Fundamentals of Farm and Stable Management

MGMT2805 Project Planning & Control  3 cr.

This class focuses on a holistic approach to project management from a cross-functional viewpoint.  The content deals with planning, scheduling, organizing, and controlling projects—for example, product development, construction, information systems, new businesses, and special events.  The course includes major topics of Strategy, Priorities, Organization, Project Tools, and Leadership.  Primary class emphasis is on the project management process and tools.  Project management is becoming more important in today’s world.  Mastery of key tools and concepts could give the student a significant competitive advantage in the marketplace. Prerequisite: MGMT1805.

MGMT2900 Career Internship 3 cr.

Arrangements are made for students to gain practical experience by working with managerial personnel in selected businesses.

MGMT3100 International Business 3 cr.

A broad-based introduction to management within the framework of international competition. The concept of international business is addressed as a global economic entity. Students deal with strategies, problems and opportunities faced by businesses engaged in international operations. Prerequisite: MGMT2200.

MGMT3190 Communications Strategies & Techniques for Managers 4 cr.

Students practice and analyze workplace communications while improving such skills as writing, presenting, participating in meetings, and listening. The role of manager in the flow of organizational communications and the ways in which thought and communications augment each other are key themes. The writing process, construction of logical arguments, analysis of audience, and one’s own communication objectives are addressed within the context of communication strategies that fulfill career and organizational objectives. This course develops students’ understanding of and appreciation for their individual learning styles. Students are introduced to the concept of lifelong learning and create their own options for lifelong learning.

MGMT3200 Financial Management 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide an understanding of financial functions in firms and the responsibilities of the financial manager. Financial concepts and tools for use in effective financial decision making and problem solving are also explored. Prerequisites:  ACCT1002.

MGMT3205 Organizational Behavior 3 cr.

This course surveys current theory and practice of psychology applied to industrial and organizational settings. Topics include work motivation, employee attitude assessment, leadership, stress in the workplace, and performance appraisal. Emphasis is placed on the work environment at all levels.

MGMT3290 Human Behavior in Organizations 3 cr.

The focus of this course is a study of organizational theory and applications. This course uses concepts from social behavioral sciences to introduce and analyze organizational change in business and public organizations.

MGMT3300 Contemporary Economics 3 cr.

This course involves a study in the U.S. economic system, including supply and demand, markets and competition, prediction and costs, and money and banking. This course also looks at current economic policies and the effects on the individual, the firm, organizations, and the nation.

MGMT3400 Human Resource Management 3 cr.

An analysis and examination of the human resource management functions. Theories and concepts leading to the effective utilization of human resources in organizations will include manpower planning, recruiting, selection and employment, training, promotion, compensation and discipline. Case studies will focus on problems associated with human resource applications in actual organizations. Prerequisite: MGMT2200, or MGMT3490 for Accelerated Program students.

MGMT3490 Accounting for Managers 3 cr.

This course explores accounting from the perspective of the users of accounting information in management decision making. Students will gain insight into the role that accounting and accounting information play in modern organizations. Emphasis will be placed on accounting principles, concepts, and methodologies as they relate to information critical to evaluating and organization’s performance and strategic alternatives.

MGMT3500 Finance for Managers 3 cr.

This course, designed for the non-financial professional, provides students with a broad overview of financial concepts and applications utilized in management decisions.  An overview of investment policies is given.  Focus is placed on the financial components of business activity with the goal of increasing financial reasoning skills as they apply to the total organization.

MGMT3600 Management Decision Making and Problem Solving 3 cr.

This course examines the structure of problems, the approaches to problem solving, and the thought processes that managers use to define problems and reach decisions. In the study of problem solving and managerial decision-making, students recognize their own decision-making style.  Prerequisites:  PSYC1001 or SOCI1001.

MGMT3705 Business Ethics & Social Responsibility 3 cr.

Ethics are guides to “right” actions & behaviors. In this course the nature of ethics, concepts and alternatives to ethics, corporate social responsibility, employer/employee relationships, business practices, and professional ethics will be examined. The course draws on your job and personal experience while examining these topic areas.

MGMT3800 Management Information Systems 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide a foundation for integrated decision making across functional areas of an organization. Developing and using information systems to support operational, tactical and strategic decision making in organizations is also explored. Prerequisites: MGMT2200.

MGMT3805 Project Team Management  3 cr.

The course surveys the many issues involved in creating and leading a project team.  Topics will include group process, team leadership skills, barriers to teamwork, the particular nature of project teams, and the importance of teamwork in project management.  Students will consider the nature and types of teams required in their action project. Prerequisite: MGMT2805.

MGMT3806 Influence, Decision Making and Problem Solving in Project Management  3 cr.

This course examines how project managers can use ethical influence techniques to achieve successful project outcomes. Looks at how groups and individuals approach decision making and problem solving under pressure. This also involves the examination of the reasons groups and individuals make suboptimal decisions, but continue to support these decisions even in the face of contradictory evidence. The class will also examine tools the project manager can use to help teams reach better decision outcomes. Prerequisites: MGMT3805.

MGMT3890 Managing Diversity in the Changing Workplace 3 cr.

The increasing diversity of the American workforce and expanding economic interdependence among nations requires that managers deal creatively with the cultural dimensions of management. The course will employ readings and experiential learning to explore and articulate perceptions of difference in order to increase management effectiveness.

MGMT3950 Junior Seminar 3 cr.

Students will integrate their knowledge developed so far, and extend that learning, through a business simulation; writing an essay on a major issue, such as whether globalization presents more opportunities than problems, or vice versa, and explaining either how the opportunities may become problems or how the problems may be mitigated; writing and presenting a piece of business fiction or a business play that is designed to highlight issues and practices in business; and working on developing their personal learning portfolio (to be further refined in senior seminar). Pre-requisites: ACCT1002, ECON2001, MGMT2200, MKTG2104, and junior standing.

MGMT3960 Budget & Performance Measurement 3 cr.

This course covers the purposes of, and techniques for, budgeting, including but not limited to developing forecasts; creating revenue, expenses, cash, and capital budgets; analyzing capital investments project proposals; and establishing budget policies, reporting procedures, and controls. Students will also identify common pitfalls, and techniques for avoiding them, when developing and managing budgets, including but not limited to techniques like The Balanced Scorecard and assessment tools applied to revenue and balance sheet outcomes. Prerequisite:  MGMT3200.

MGMT4000 Business Research Methods 3 cr.

This course teaches students skills and techniques for conducting, writing, and evaluating research projects. Coursework focuses on problem definitions, research planning, instrument design, data collections, and sampling techniques.

MGMT4100 Business Policy and Strategy 3 cr.

This is a capstone course in which students will develop their managerial skills through the analysis of problems in various-sized businesses. This course integrates the knowledge that students have gained in accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing. Students will do a business simulation and will write a business plan. They will analyze real companies, identify problems, and formulate a course of action that aligns with, and supports, a company’s strategy.  Prerequisites:  54 credits earned and MGMT2200, MGMT3200, and MKTG2104.

MGMT4105 Project Management: Tools & Techniques 4 cr.

All organizations can benefit by focusing their efforts on improving customer satisfaction and expense control. The Project Management: Tools and Techniques course will help you develop these skills. The course covers: Defining Needs and Opportunities; The Project Management Process and its Benefits; Scheduling Work Activities; Project Management Software; Time/Cost Trade-Offs; Resource Planning; Cost Forecasting and Control; and Team Development and Effectiveness.

MGMT4190 Statistical Techniques for Managers 3 cr.

The course provides an overview of basic data analysis and descriptive statistical methods useful in making business and organizational decisions. Presents statistical techniques to help students better understand research reports, business plans, and financial and marketing data.

MGMT4195 Leadership, Communication and Change 3 cr.

This course is designed to enable individuals to work in diverse situations as members of a team and as leaders of a team – to 1) identify, share, and apply effective communication strategies, which include – corporate vision, strategies, values, principles, and plans; 2) prepare messages to guide and motivate employees, 3) negotiate human resource issues, contracts, and managerial strategies.  Prerequisite:  MGMT2200.

MGMT4200 Training and Development 3 cr.

A systematic approach to training and development. Topics will include needs assessment and design of the learning environment, training methods, the link between training and development, and a company’s strategic direction. Current development issues include cross- culture preparation, managing workforce diversity and succession planning. Prerequisite:  MGMT2200.

MGMT4201 Compensation and Benefits 3 cr.

Examines the decisions that go into paying employees; the concepts and research underlying those decisions; the alternative techniques used to help make decisions; and the objectives obtained. Topics include job evaluation, pay determination, employee benefits, government regulations, and current trends. Prerequisite: MGMT2200.

MGMT4300 Managing in the Global Economy 3 cr.

This course examines how global enterprises operate by addressing the impact of economic, political, social, natural environment, ethics, and technology on corporate strategies, operations, and efficiencies.  In addition, the course delves into the effect that globalization has on career paths.

MGMT4400 Current Issues in Strategic Planning 3 cr.

The course focuses on strategic thinking to help organizations plan for the future. The course examines modern concepts of strategic planning, especially in terms of increasing environmental and organizational complexity.

MGMT4600 Capstone: Becoming a Reflective Practitioner 3 cr.

In this course, students synthesize learning from all the Required Courses. They apply content knowledge from the various disciplines to real-world organizational situations. Also, they reflect on the skills developed during the program and the future direction of their professional lives.

MGMT4805 Project Management Capstone  3 cr.

This course involves the application of learning to projects and/or issues currently at play within individual student’s industries and/or organizations.  Actual projects currently being developed in student’s workplaces can be used, or students can create their own projects based on current trends and challenges within their industry or organization. Prerequisites: MGMT3805 and MGMT3806.

MGMT4900 Career Internship 3 cr.

This course integrates classroom studies with practical experience. Supervised work experience in management or human resources. Twelve hours per week for twelve weeks (minimum). Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA and permission from advisor.

MGMT4950 Senior Seminar – Students who need this course should take MGMT3205 Organizational Behavior

Senior seminar meets to hear visiting business leaders discuss business strategy, interviewing skills, and professional advancement. Students also focus on refining and expanding their personal learning portfolios, a topic broached in MGMT1000 and re-emphasized in every subsequent business course (e.g., students will present work as Word documents, including original submissions and later reflective pieces, which they will be reminded to hold on to; and students will be given access to a College computer drive where they can submit these works while maintaining their privacy). A third element of this seminar will be the creation and presentation of a viable business plan, representing an entrepreneurial opportunity for the student or for another person or team. Pre-requisites: MGMT3950, MGMT3600, and senior standing.

MKTG2101 Advertising 3 cr.

This course studies advertising as a tool of business: its functions, how to write and display it, where to publish it, the operating side from the standpoint of agencies, media, campaigns, and the testing of results.

MKTG2104 Principles of Marketing 3 cr.

This course is designed to be a concentrated study of the marketing of consumer and industrial products on the retail, wholesale, and manufactory levels. Marketing functions are defined and described along with an analysis of the various marketing processes. Classroom work includes a study of related case materials.

MKTG3001 Marketing Management 3 cr.

In this course, students solve marketing problems from a management point of view. Emphasis is on analyzing marketing situations, identifying problems, determining solutions, implementing corrective action, and planning strategy. The student learns how the marketing management functions are applied to produce an effective marketing program. The case study method is applied.  Prerequisite: MKTG2104.

MKTG3005 Consumer Behavior 3 cr.

An analysis of marketplace and consumer behavior as determined by characteristics of age, sex, geographic location, income levels, educational background, etc. Examines the uses of test marketing and its relation to decision making. Prerequisite: MKTG2104.

MKTG3105 Global Marketing 3 cr.

Global Marketing focuses on the international/cultural approach to international marketing and trade, the competitive environment, and culture and its impact on human behavior. In addition, adult learners gain perspectives relative to global opportunities and trends in marketing, trade agreements, and how to develop global strategies. The “Four P’s” of product, price, place, and promotion receive thorough review, as seen from a global perspective. Emphasis is placed throughout the courses on culture and how to weave marketing strategies within the world-wide environment while, at the same time, being sensitive to the cultural nuances within various international markets.

MKTG3300 Customer Engagement 3 cr. (previously titled Principles of Sales)

This course gives students an opportunity to develop customer engagement techniques.  We will explore the elements of customer engagement leading to a sale and develop them to the point where students will be able to present and evaluate the selling and buying process.  A group project will offer an opportunity to apply the principles of customer engagement leading to the sale of a product or service.  Prerequisite: MKTG2104.

MKTG4001 Marketing Research 3 cr.

This course involves the collection, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of data for use in the marketing management process. Modern research techniques are studied. Prerequisite: MKTG2104.

MKTG4105 International Marketing 3 cr.

Students will apply the fundamental principles of marketing to the international arena. They will examine culture, history, geography, religion, economics, and business climate in terms of their impact on the marketing process. They will learn how marketing strategies and promotional messages are context-specific, and how both multinational and global marketing strategies can be effective depending on the target market and the characteristics of a company’s products and services. Case studies and current events will provide an opportunity to put the course material into practice.  Prerequisite: MKTG2104

MKTG4200 Retail Marketing 3 cr.

An overview of retail marketing at the operational level. This course considers problems of store location and layout, buying, reviewing inventory and stock control, pricing, merchandising and promotion. Prerequisite: MKTG2104

MKTG4300 Marketing Seminar 3 cr.

An advanced discussion of marketing principles, this course studies new trends in marketing research, techniques, strategy and evaluation of success and failure. Prerequisite: MKTG2104.

MKTG4400 Advanced Topics in Marketing 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Advanced Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.  Prerequisite:  MKTG2104

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» NURS1103 Essentials of Health Assessment and Promotion 3 cr.
» NURS1104 Fundamentals of Nursing 4 cr.
» NURS1105 Nursing II 10 cr.
» NURS1200 Introduction to the Profession of Nursing  3 cr.
» NURS2103 Health Assessment and Promotion Across the Lifespan 3 cr.
» NURS2201 Nursing III 10 cr.
» NURS2202 Nursing IV 10 cr.
» NURS2205 Seminar in Nursing 2 cr.
» NURS2400 Principles of Nursing Care 6 cr.
» NURS3000 Introduction to Pharmacokinetics in Nursing 3 cr.
» NURS3001 Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations in Nursing Practice  3 cr.
» NURS3002 Complementary Alternative Modalities   3 cr.
» NURS3003 Pharmacokinetics in Nursing Practice  3 cr.
» NURS3100 Research in Nursing  3 cr.
» NURS3101 Health and Physical Assessment of Individuals and Families  4 cr. (3 hour lecture and 1 hour lab weekly)
» NURS3102 Business in Nursing  3 cr.
» NURS3200 Technology and Nursing Informatics 3 cr.
» NURS3300 Medical Surgical Nursing I  6 cr.
» NURS3305 Medical Surgical Nursing II  6 cr.
» NURS3400 Maternal and Child Nursing  6 cr.
» NURS3600 Community Health Nursing  4 cr.
» NURS4001 Nursing in a Global Society  3 cr.
» NURS4002 Independent Practicum I  3 cr.
» NURS4003 Independent Practicum II  3 cr.
» NURS4101 Professional Nursing Seminar 3 cr.
» NURS4200 Care of Patients with Complex Physiological and Psychological Health Issues  6 cr.
» NURS4205 Transition to Nursing Practice  2 cr.
» NURS4401 Holistic Nursing Practice: Techniques and Application  3 cr.
» NURS4402 Nursing Leadership and Politics  3 cr.
» NURS4403 Professional Nurse as Educator  3 cr.
» NURS4404 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention  3 cr.
» NURS4901 Transition to Nursing Practice Practicum  3 cr.

NURS1103 Essentials of Health Assessment and Promotion 3 cr.

Health Assessment and Promotion provides the student with the knowledge and skills required for obtaining a comprehensive health history and performing a physical, psychological, sociocultural, developmental and spiritual assessment on adult and geriatric patients. Emphasis is placed on health promotion, identification of normal/anticipated findings, common variations, beginning skill acquisition, and documentation of collected data.  Students are required to pass the didactic and lab components of this course. A minimum grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program. Corequisites: NURS1104, BIOL2503, ENGL1001.

NURS1104 Fundamentals of Nursing 4 cr.

Fundamentals of Nursing introduces students to the basic nursing concepts, scientific principles, and nursing skills necessary to meet health care needs common to all patients. Using the nursing process and the core competencies necessary for safe and effective contemporary nursing practice across the life span (Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration, Evidenced-Based Practice, Quality Improvement, Safety, Informatics and Technology, Professionalism, Leadership, System-Based Practice, and Communication) students acquire the knowledge and skills essential to promoting optimal wellness in the adult and geriatric patient’s physiological, psychological, socio-cultural, developmental, and spiritual dimensions of health. The college lab and clinical practicum experiences afford the student opportunities to apply and refine acquired nursing knowledge and skills.  Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments. The student is given three attempts to pass this competency.  Students are required to achieve a minimum benchmark score of Level 1 on the ATI RN Fundamentals of Nursing proctored exam.  Students will have only two attempts to achieve the required minimum benchmark score.  Students are required to pass the didactic, college lab, and clinical practicum components of this course. A minimum grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program.  Corequisites NURS1103, BIOL2503, ENGL1001.

NURS1105 Nursing II 10 cr.

Nursing II builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in the previous nursing courses (NURS1103 and NURS1104).  Students apply the nursing process and the core competencies necessary for safe and effective contemporary nursing practice across the life span (Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration, Evidenced-Based Practice, Quality Improvement, Safety, Informatics and Technology, Professionalism, Leadership, System-Based Practice, and Communication) to the care of adult medical-surgical patients.  The effect of illness on patients’ dimensions of health is considered, as students refine their ability to provide prioritized care to adult medical-surgical patients. Pharmacological and nutritional principles are integrated throughout the course.  The college lab and clinical practicum experiences afford the student with opportunities to apply and refine acquired nursing knowledge and skills.  Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments. The student is given three attempts to pass this competency. Students are required to pass the didactic, college lab, and clinical practicum components of this course.  A C+ or better is required to continue in the Nursing program.  Prerequisites: C+ or better in NURS1103, NURS1104, and C or better in BIOL2503. Corequisites:  BIOL2502, BIOL2504.

NURS1200 Introduction to the Profession of Nursing 3 cr.

This course provides the history of nursing and the development of nursing knowledge. This course explores the values and competencies expected of the baccalaureate level student. The course also focuses on selected philosophical and theoretical principles in nursing practice and ethical and legal dimensions. These principles may be applied to an array of nurse practice settings and disciplines. A grade of C+ or better in this course is required to continue in the nursing program. Prerequisites: CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001. See Pre-licensure BSN requirements for admission into the Year 2, Semester 2 nursing courses. Corequisites: BIOL2502, EXC3105, and NURS1200.

NURS2103 Health Assessment and Promition Across the Lifespan 3 cr.

Health Assessment and Promotion provides the student with the knowledge and skills required for obtaining a comprehensive health history and performing a physical, psychological, sociocultural, developmental and spiritual assessment on individual adults and families across the lifespan.  Emphasis is placed on health promotion, identification of normal/anticipated findings, common variations, beginning skill acquisition, and documentation of collected data.  Students are required to pass the didactic and lab components of this course. A minimum grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program.  Open to nursing majors only.  Students in the Bachelor’s degree nursing program will be required to have the following courses as a prerequisite to beginning the clinical component:  CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 all with a C or better; MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS1200, NURS3002.  Corequisites: NURS3003, NURS2400, NURS3200.

NURS2201 Nursing III 10 cr.

Nursing III is designed to further build upon the nursing knowledge and skills acquired in the preceding nursing courses (NURS1103, NURS1104, and NURS1105). Students refine their ability to use the nursing process and the core competencies necessary for safe and effective contemporary nursing practice across the life span (Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration, Evidenced-Based Practice, Quality Improvement, Safety, Informatics and Technology, Professionalism, Leadership, System-Based Practice, and Communication) to plan and prioritize care for adult and pediatric patients with medical-surgical conditions of increased complexity.  The effect of significant illness on the adult and pediatric patient’s dimensions of health is considered with greater intensity. Pharmacological and nutritional principles are integrated throughout the course. During the associated college lab and clinical practicum experiences students have the opportunity to apply and refine acquired nursing knowledge and skills. Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments.  The student is given three attempts to pass this competency.  Students are required to achieve a minimum benchmark score of Level 2 on the ATI RN Adult Medical-Surgical Nursing proctored exam.  Students will have only two attempts to achieve the required minimum benchmark score of Level 2 on this exam.  Students are required to pass the theoretical, college lab, and clinical experience portions of this course.  A grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program.  Prerequisites: C+ or better in NURS1105; C or better in BIOL2502, BIOL2504, and in BIOL 2503.  Corequisites: PSYC1107, PSYC1001, INFO1001.

NURS2202 Nursing IV 10 cr.

Nursing IV builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in the previous nursing courses (NURS1103, NURS1104, NURS1105, and NURS2201).  Students further refine their ability to use the nursing process, the dimensions of health, and the core competencies necessary for safe and effective contemporary nursing practice across the life span (Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration, Evidenced-Based Practice, Quality Improvement, Safety, Informatics and Technology, Professionalism, Leadership, System-Based Practice, and Communication) to plan, implement and prioritize care for childbearing families, neonates, psychiatric/ mental health patients, and medical-surgical patients with complex health needs in a variety of care settings. The principles associated with the management of patient care are broadened to include principles of delegation and organization of care for a group of patients.  Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments. The student is given three attempts to pass this competency.  Students are required to achieve a minimum benchmark score of 70% on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor proctored exam.  Students will have only two attempts to achieve the required minimum benchmark score of 70% on this exam.  Students are required to pass both the classroom and clinical components of this course. A grade of C+ or better is required in both NURS2202 and NURS2205 to be eligible to graduate from the Nursing Program. Prerequisites: C+ or better in NURS 2201.  C or better in BIOL2502, BIOL2504, and in BIOL2503.  Corequisite:  NURS2205.

NURS2205 Seminar in Nursing 2 cr.

The role of the registered nurse upon entry into practice in the contemporary health care system is explored.  The student considers the total development of the nurse to meet the role requirements and responsibilities. Personal, ethical, and legal aspects of nursing care are discussed along with issues and trends in nursing practice. A grade of C+ or better is required in both NURS2205 and NURS2202 to be eligible to graduate from the Nursing Program. Prerequisites: C+ or better in NURS2201.  Corequisite:  NURS2202.

NURS2400 Principles of Nursing Care 6 cr.

This course introduces students to basic nursing concepts, scientific principles, and nursing skills necessary to meet the health care needs common to all patients. Students acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to promote optimal wellness in the adult and older adult patients’ physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual dimensions. The college lab and clinical practicum experiences afford the student with opportunities to apply and refine acquired nursing skills.

Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments. Remediation is prescribed for the student failing the initial exam. The student is given three attempts to pass this competency.  Students are required to achieve a minimum benchmark score of Level 1 on the ATI RN Fundamentals of Nursing proctored exam.  Students will have only two attempts to achieve the required minimum benchmark score.  Students are required to pass the didactic, college lab, and clinical practicum components of this course.  To progress in the nursing program, a grade of C+ or better is required in this course.  Prerequisites: Only offered for students enrolled in the prelicensure Bachelor of Science in nursing program.  CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS1200, and NURS3002.  Corequisites NURS2103, NURS3000, and NURS3200.

NOTE:  Admission to this course and the third year of the nursing program is determined through a selective admissions process.  See admissions information for further details.

NURS3000 Introduction to Pharmacokinetics in Nursing 3 cr.

This course will introduce the students to pharmacology and its therapeutic effects on patients.  Content will include the principles of pathophysiology and pharmacology in the treatment of specific diseases.  Generic and trade names, indications, contraindications, precautions, adverse reactions, drug interactions, dosage, and administration will be discussed.  The role of pharmaceutical agents in the prevention, treatment, and management of disease states will be discussed.  Drug effects on age-specific patient populations and documentation requirements will be reinforced.  To progress in the nursing program, a grade of C+ or better is required in this course.  Prerequisites: Only offered for students enrolled in the prelicensure Bachelor of Science in nursing program.  CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS1200, and NURS3002.  Corequisites NURS2103, NURS2400, and NURS3200.

NOTE:  Admission to this course and the third year of the nursing program is determined through a selective admissions process.  See admissions information for further details.

NURS3001 Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations in Nursing Practice  3 cr.

This course provides the history of nursing and the development of nursing knowledge. This course explores the values and competencies expected of the baccalaureate level student. The course also focuses on selected philosophical and theoretical principles in nursing practice. These foundations may be applied to an array of nurse practice settings and disciplines.  The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress.  Open only to students enrolled in the RN to BSN program.

NURS3002 Complementary Alternative Modalities   3 cr.

This course introduces the student to the use of complementary and alternative modalities (CAM) including holistic theory and the various techniques available for interventions with patients in the health care system. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging field of complementary/ alternative modalities (CAM). The legal, ethical, and professional implications for the nurse related to CAM will be discussed. Open to students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Prelicensure) and RN to BSN nursing programs only. A grade of C+ or better in this course is required to continue in the nursing program.

Prerequisites:  Prelicensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing: CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200 INFO1001. See Pre-licensure BSN requirements for admission into the Year 2, Semester 2 nursing courses. Corequisites: BIOL2502, EXC3105, and NURS1200.  RN to BSN Program, admission to the RN to BSN nursing program.

NURS3003 Pharmacokinetics in Nursing Practice  3 cr.

This course will enhance the nurse’s knowledge of pharmacology and its therapeutic effects on patients.  Content will present the principles of pathophysiology and pharmacology in the treatment of specific diseases.  Generic and trade names, indications, contraindications, precautions, adverse reactions, drug interactions, dosage, and administration will be discussed.  The role of pharmaceutical agents in the prevention, treatment, and management of disease states will be discussed.  Drug effects on age-specific patient populations and documentation requirements will be reinforced. The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress. Open only to students enrolled in the RN to BSN program.

NURS3100 Research in Nursing  3 cr.

This course provides the baccalaureate nursing student with an appreciation of the components of the research process. Emphasis is placed upon the research process, research designs, reading and critiquing research, and research utilization in clinical practice. Through the development, implementation, and presentation of an individual research project the student gains an appreciation of research as the foundation for evidence-based practice. Open to students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Prelicensure) and RN to BSN nursing programs only. A grade of C+ or better in this course is required to continue in the nursing program.

Students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Prelicensure) degree program will be required to have the following courses as a prerequisite: CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200 (with a final course grade of C or higher), INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS3002, NURS1200, NURS2103, NURS3003, NURS2400, and NURS3200. Corequisites: NURS3300 Medical Surgical Nursing I, and NURS3400 Maternal Child Nursing.

Students in the RN-BSN program may take this course following successful completion of NURS3001, NURS3002, NURS3101, and NURS3003.  Successful completion of MATH2200 with a final course grade of C or higher is a required prerequisite course.

NURS3101 Health and Physical Assessment of Individuals and Families  4 cr. (3 hour lecture and 1 hour lab weekly)

This course provides the opportunity to apply nursing theoretical principles to the implementation phase of a holistic physical and health assessment. The course will include patients as individuals groups, and will explore normal as well as abnormal findings.  Emphasis is on assessment, competent technical skills in examination, critical analysis and implications of abnormal findings, and health promotion. Methods for group assessment, intervention, and evaluation are included.  The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress in the nursing program. Open only to students enrolled in the RN to BSN program.

NURS3102 Business in Nursing  3 cr.

This course explores the theoretical basis of effective nursing management and leadership. Effective skills of nurse leaders/managers in practice settings are analyzed and discussed. Selected current issues and trends in management/leadership and nursing are integrated into the course content. Participation with a nurse in a leadership or management position will allow the student an opportunity to analyze the application of leadership principles. The student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress in the RN to BSN program. Open only to students enrolled in the RN to BSN program.

NURS3200 Technology and Nursing Informatics 3 cr.

Technology and Nursing Informatics will provide a foundation for the synthesis of technology into the role of nursing practice. The course will focus on exploring the various technologies and their utilization within the confines of system resources to meet patient and nursing care needs. Open to students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Prelicensure) and RN to BSN nursing programs only. Students are required to receive a grade of C+ or better in this course to continue in the nursing program. Students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Prelicensure) degree program will be required to have the following courses as a prerequisite: CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH220, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS1200, and NURS3302. Corequisites: NURS2103, NURS2400, and NURS3000. Students in the RN-BSN program may take this course following successful completion of all NURS3000 courses with a grade of C+ or better.

NURS3300 Medical Surgical Nursing I 6 cr.

This course focuses on the care of selected patients experiencing common illnesses. The care of the adult medical-surgical patient is viewed from the perspective of building on the core competencies (Patient Centered Care, Teamwork and Collaboration, Evidenced-Based Practice, Quality Improvement, Safety, Informatics and Technology, Professionalism, Leadership, System-Based Practice, and Communication). The physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual dimensions of health are considered in prioritizing and implementing nursing interventions to promote patient stability. Pharmacological and nutritional principles are integrated throughout the course. The classroom, college lab, and clinical learning experiences within this nursing course build upon previously acquired knowledge and skills.

Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments. Remediation is prescribed for the student failing the initial exam. The student is given three attempts to pass this competency. Students are required to pass the didactic, college lab, and clinical practicum components of this course.  A grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program.  Prerequisites: Open only to students enrolled in the prelicensure BSN program.  CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS1200, NURS3002, NURS2103, NURS2400, NURS3300, and NURS3200.  Corequisites:  NURS3100.  NURS3400 Maternal-Child Nursing will be taken the same semester (Year 3, Semester 2), as assigned either prior to or after completing NURS3300 Medical Surgical Nursing 1.

NURS3305 Medical Surgical Nursing II 6 cr.

This course focuses on the care of selected patients experiencing increasingly complex medical-surgical conditions.  The physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual dimensions of health are considered in prioritizing and implementing nursing interventions to promote health and well-being for adult patients with increasingly complex medical-surgical conditions.  The nursing program core competencies, critical reasoning and application of best current evidence to clinical practice will be stressed.  Pharmacological and nutritional principles are integrated throughout the course. The classroom, college lab, and clinical learning experiences within this nursing course build upon previously acquired knowledge and skills.

Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments. Remediation is prescribed for the student failing the initial exam. The student is given three attempts to pass this competency. Students are required to pass the didactic, college lab, and clinical practicum components of this course.  A grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program.  Prerequisites: Open only to students enrolled in the prelicensure BSN program.  CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS3002, NURS2103, NURS2400, NURS3003, NURS3200, NURS3300, NURS3400, and NURS3100.  Corequisites: NURS3600, NURS4403, and an open elective course.

NURS3400 Maternal and Child Nursing 6 cr.

This course focuses on the nursing needs of childbearing women and children from conception through adolescence.  The physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual dimensions of health are considered in prioritizing and implementing nursing interventions to promote health and well-being for perinatal, neonatal, and pediatric patients and family members.  Critical reasoning and application of best current evidence to clinical practice will be stressed.  Pharmacological and nutritional principles are integrated throughout the course. The classroom, college lab, and clinical learning experiences within this nursing course build upon previously acquired knowledge and skills.  A grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program.  Prerequisites: Open only to students enrolled in the prelicensure BSN program.  CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS1200, NURS3002, NURS2103, NURS2400, NURS3303, and NURS3200.  Corequisites:  NURS3100.  NURS3300 Medical Surgical Nursing 1 will be taken the same semester (Year 3, Semester 2), as assigned either prior to or after completing NURS3400 Maternal Child Nursing.

NURS3600 Community Health Nursing 4 cr.

This course applies the nursing program core concepts and dimensions of health to the care of individuals, families, and groups from a community health perspective.  Emphasis is placed nurse’s role in healthcare systems to meet the health care needs of a global society. Practice issues which include health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, wellness, cultural issues, and healthcare technology systems in the community setting are discussed. A grade of C+ or better is required to continue in the nursing program.   Prerequisites:  Open only to students enrolled in the prelicensure BSN program. CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS3002, NURS2103, NURS2400, NURS3003, NURS3200, NURS3300, NURS3400, and NURS3100.  Corequisites: NURS3305 NURS4403, and an open elective course.

NURS4001 Nursing in a Global Society  3 cr.

This course focuses on the nurse’s role in healthcare systems to meet the needs of a global society. Practice issues which include health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, wellness, cultural issues, and healthcare technology systems in the community setting are discussed. Open only to students enrolled in the RN-BSN program.  The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress.  Prerequisites:  Completion of all NURS3000 courses with a grade of C+ or better.  Co-requisite:  NURS4002.

NURS4002 Independent Practicum I  3 cr. (1 hour meeting weekly conference with class and a total of 30 hours of clinical during the course)

During this course the student will experience an independent practicum to develop his/her role as a baccalaureate nurse practicing in a community healthcare setting. An array of community healthcare settings and disciplines may be utilized for the clinical practicum. To facilitate the achievement of defined course learning outcomes the student is required to develop personal goals and objectives for the community nursing practicum experience prior to the start of the approved clinical practicum. Open only to students enrolled in the RN-BSN program. The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress. Prerequisites: Completion of all NURS3000 courses with a grade of C+ or better. Corequisite: NURS4001.

NURS4003 Independent Practicum II  3 cr. (1 hour meeting weekly conference with class and a total of 30 hours of clinical during the course)

During this course the student will experience an independent practicum to further develop his/her role as a baccalaureate nurse.  An array of healthcare settings and disciplines may be utilized for the clinical practicum. The student may elect to continue in the same setting as Independent Practicum I. To facilitate the achievement of defined course learning outcomes the student is required to develop personal goals and objectives for the practicum experience prior to the start of the approved clinical practicum.  Open only to students enrolled in the RN-BSN program. The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress.  Prerequisites: Completion of all 3000 level courses with a C+ or better and completion of NURS4002 with a grade of C+ or better. Corequisites: Enrollment in a nursing elective.

NURS4101 Professional Nursing Seminar 3 cr.

This course focuses on the synthesis of concepts essential to the role of the baccalaureate nurse as a contributing member of the healthcare team. Personal, ethical, and legal aspects of nursing care are discussed along with issues and trends in nursing practice for a diverse patient population. This course must be taken in the last semester of program completion requirements or as the final Bachelor of Science in nursing course. The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress. Prerequisites: NURS4001 and NURS4002.

NURS4200 Care of Patients with Complex Physiological and Psychological Health Issues 6 cr.

This course focuses on the care of patients experiencing increasingly complex physiological and psychological health conditions.  The physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual dimensions of health are considered in prioritizing and implementing nursing interventions to promote health and well-being for patients with complex medical-surgical and psychiatric/mental health issues.  The nursing program core competencies, critical reasoning and application of best current evidence to clinical practice will be stressed.  Pharmacological and nutritional principles are integrated throughout the course. The classroom, college lab, and clinical learning experiences within this nursing course build upon previously acquired knowledge and skills.  Students are expected to achieve a minimum grade of 85% or higher on the math competency exam prior to clinical assignments. Remediation is prescribed for the student failing the initial exam. The student is given three attempts to pass this competency.  Students are required to achieve a minimum benchmark score of Level 2 on the ATI RN Adult Medical-Surgical Nursing proctored exam.  Students will have only two attempts to achieve the required minimum benchmark score of Level 2 on this exam. Students are required to pass the didactic, college lab, and clinical practicum components of this course.  A grade of C+ or better is required to pass the course and be eligible for graduation.  Prerequisites: Open only to students enrolled in the traditional BSN program. CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS3002, NURS2103, NURS2400, NURS3003, NURS3200, NURS3300, NURS3400, NURS3100, NURS3305, NURS3600, and NURS4403.  Corequisites: NURS4205, NURS4901, and an open elective course.

NURS4205 Transition to Nursing Practice 2 cr.

This course focuses on the synthesis concepts essential to the role of the entry-level Registered Nurse, as a contributing member of the healthcare team. Personal, ethical, and legal aspects of nursing care are discussed along with issues and trends in nursing practice affecting the delivery of health care and the discipline of the professional practice of nursing.  Students are required to achieve a minimum benchmark score of 70% on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor proctored exam.  Students will have only two attempts to achieve the required minimum benchmark score of 70% on this exam.  A grade of C+ or better is required to pass the course and be eligible for graduation.  Prerequisites:  Open only to students enrolled in the traditional BSN program.  . CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS3002, NURS2103, NURS2400, NURS3003, NURS3200, NURS3300, NURS3400, NURS3100, NURS3305, NURS3600, and NURS4403.  Corequisites: NURS4901, NURS4200, and an open elective course.

NURS4401 Holistic Nursing Practice: Techniques and Application  3 cr.

This course further develops the nurse’s knowledge and techniques of holistic practice. Emphasis will be placed on developing the skills needed and exploring the avenues available to implement complimentary/ alternative modalities (CAM) into nursing practice. A variety of holistic modalities will be explored. Open only to students enrolled in the RN-BSN program. The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress. Prerequisites: Completion of all NURS3000 courses with a grade of C+ or better.

NURS4402 Nursing Leadership and Politics  3 cr.

This course nurtures the development of the student‘s own philosophy of nursing leadership. This elective builds on NURS3102 Business in Nursing. The impact of the political system on health care policy will be reviewed. Students will develop skills in formulating management skills but will concentrate on the role of a nurse in a leadership role. Emphasis will be placed on the nurse‘s professional role, concepts of vision, creativity, and leadership in complex health care system with a focus on the power of politics. Open only to students enrolled in the RN-BSN program. The RN to BSN student must achieve a final course grade of C+ or higher to progress. Prerequisites: Completion of all NURS3000 courses with a grade of C+ or better.

NURS4403 Professional Nurse as Educator  3 cr.

This course is designed to develop the student as a patient, family, and community health nurse educator. Principles of program development and presentation skills for age-appropriate populations will be the emphasis of this course. Students will research, develop, and present a healthcare educational program during the course while utilizing the appropriate principles. Open to students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Prelicensure) and RN to BSN nursing programs only.  Students are required to receive a grade of C+ or better in this course to continue in the nursing program.

Students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Prelicensure) degree program will be required to have the following courses as a prerequisite: CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS3002,NURS1200, NURS2103, NURS3000, NURS2400, NURS3200, NURS3300, NURS3400, and NURS3100. Corequisites: NURS3600, NURS3305, and an open elective course.

Students in the RN-BSN program may take this course following successful completion of all NURS3000 courses with a grade of C+ or better.

NURS4404 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention  3 cr.

This course focuses on health education
strategies which can be incorporated into primary care. It integrates the foundational
concepts of nursing practice with the concepts of health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention. Wellness promotion of individuals and groups will be discussed as well as the need for risk factor reduction, screenings, and early intervention. The role of the nurse in educating individual patients as well as the availability of and involvement in community health promotion efforts will be addressed.  Students are required to receive a grade of C+ or better in this course to continue in the nursing program. Prerequisites: C+ or better in all NURS3000 nursing courses and NURS4001.

NURS4901 Transition to Nursing Practice Practicum 1 cr.

During this course the student will experience a 15-hour practicum to develop his/her role as an entry level Registered Nurse and facilitate the transition from nursing student to professional nurse. The practicum will provide the student with the opportunity to observe and participate in a healthcare setting to identify clinical decision making issues common to the entry-level Registered Nurse.  A grade of C+ or higher required in the practicum to pass the course and be eligible for graduation.  Prerequisites: Open only to students enrolled in the prelicensure BSN program.  CHEM1001, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL2502 with a C or better in all prerequisite science courses, MATH1200, MATH2200, INFO1001, EXSC3105, NURS3002, NURS2103, NURS2400, NURS3003, NURS3200, NURS3300, NURS3400, NURS3100, NURS3305, NURS3600, and NURS4403.  Corequisites: NURS4205, NURS4200, and an open elective course.

O

OPER3001 Production and Operations Management – Students who need this course should take MGMT3950 Junior Seminar

P

» PHIL1001 Introduction to Philosophy 3 cr.
» PHIL1102 The Good Life 3 cr.
» PHIL3001 Ethics 3 cr.
» PHIL3200 Ethics in Veterinary Medicine 3 cr.
» PHIL3300 Medical Ethics 3 cr.
» PHSC1001 Integrated Physical Science 4 cr.
» PHYS1003 “Life, the Universe, and Everything: An Introduction to Wu Li”: A Conceptual  Physics Course 3 cr.
» PHYS2001 Physics I 4 cr.
» PHYS2002 Physics II 4 cr.
» PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC1002 Developmental Child Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC1003 Basic Concepts and Principles in Applied Behavior Analysis 3 cr.
» PSYC1013 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis 6 cr.
» PSYC1107 Human Growth and Development 3 cr.
» PSYC1500 Mental Health First Aid 1 cr.
» PSYC2001 Psychology of Adjustment 3 cr.
» PSYC2002 Psychology of Personality 3 cr.
» PSYC2003 Behavioral Assessment & Data Collection Display and Interpretation 3 cr.
» PSYC2013 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis 6 cr.
» PSYC2105 Social Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC2107 Experimental Social Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC2110 Cultural Competence for Human Service Workers 3 cr.
» PSYC2203 Understanding Diversity 3 cr.
» PSYC2205 A Place Called Home 3 cr.
» PSYC2300 Adolescents At-Risk 3 cr. (previously Adolescent Psychology)
» PSYC2303 Psychopharmacology for Counselors 3 cr.
» PSYC2400 Forensic Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC2405 Correctional Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC2505 Community Systems and Intervention – Students who need this course should take PSYC2808 Psychological Tests and Measures
» PSYC2506 Case Management Practice 3 cr.
» PSYC2603 Brain and Behavior 3 cr.
» PSYC2705 Concepts and Principles in Applied Behavior Analysis 3cr.
» PSYC2710 Assessment and Measurement in Behavior Analysis 3cr.
» PSYC2806 Educational Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC2808 Psychological Tests and Measures 3 cr.
» PSYC3003 Strategies for Changing Behavior 3 cr.
» PSYC3004 Writing for Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC3013 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis 6 cr.
» PSYC3100 Cognitive Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC3200 Psychology of Family 3 cr.
» PSYC3300 Addictions Counseling 3 cr.
» PSYC3301 The 12 Core Functions of the Substance Abuse Counselor 3 cr.
» PSYC3305 Group Counseling 3 cr.
» PSYC3400 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC3402 Child Psychopathology 3 cr.
» PSYC3603 Positive Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC3605 Zoobiquity Theory 3 cr.
» PSYC3700 Sports Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC3705 Beginning Strategies for Changing Behavior 3 cr.
» PSYC3710 Advanced Strategies for Changing Behavior 3 cr.
» PSYC3902 Psychology Internship I and Seminar 3 cr. (offered in fall semester)
» PSYC3903 Psychology Internship II and Seminar 3 cr. (offered in spring semester)
» PSYC4001 Research Methods – Students who need this course should take PSYC4005
» PSYC4005 Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences with Lab 4 cr.
» PSYC4007 Advanced Research Methods in Psychology 1 cr.
» PSYC4200 Contemporary Issues in Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC4300 Substance Abuse Treatment in Groups 3 cr.  (previously Substance Abuse Counseling in Groups)
» PSYC4301 Counseling Children 3 cr.
» PSYC4306 Counseling Theory and Practice 3 cr.
» PSYC4400 Criminal Minds 3 cr.
» PSYC4600 Senior Seminar in Psychology 3 cr.
» PSYC4902 Psychology Honors Practicum 9 cr.
» PSYC4903 Practicum in Addictions Counseling 6 cr.

PHIL1001 Introduction to Philosophy 3 cr.

Introduction through analysis of primary source selections to five philosophical models of the universe: classical realism, idealism, naturalism, existentialism, and either positivism or analytic philosophy. Within each of the models the following areas will be studied: metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, social philosophy, philosophy of justice, philosophy of science, aesthetics, philosophy of religion and concluding or summary statement giving an overview of the model.

PHIL1102 The Good Life 3 cr.

This course will examine various conceptions of the good life. Everyone has opinions about that. We will examine some of these, as well as pertinent philosophical texts, in order to ask how different opinions can be supported by evidence and reasonable argument, and to clarify concepts that have more than one meaning. We will practice asking and answering these questions in the course of talking about the good life and its various components such as love and marriage, and citizenship and freedom.

PHIL3001 Ethics 3 cr.

The student will be able to recognize and define the various types of formal logic processes used in argumentation and distinguish between valid and invalid arguments. The student will be able to identify the six basic types of value systems and distinguish between the variations in the systems.

PHIL3200 Ethics in Veterinary Medicine - students who need this course should take ANSC3100 Animals in Society.

PHIL3300 Medical Ethics 3 cr.

This course is an examination of the various schools of moral philosophy and their application to ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in the medical field. The first half of the course emphasizes various formal ethical theories, such as teleological and deontological theories, which address the different approaches used in the creation of a personal code of ethics and the ethical principles guide a profession or a society. The second half of the course will have the student analyze common health care dilemmas and apply the theoretical principles and practical methods used in reaching ethical solutions to ethical problems. The areas of health care delivery, health care policy, and biomedical research will be addressed and the impact of current health care regulations will also be considered. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

PHSC1001 Integrated Physical Science 4 cr.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and concepts of the physical sciences. Topics covered will pertain to the fields of physics, chemistry, geology, and astronomy. Emphasis will be placed on how these various disciplines impact our everyday life activities. Throughout the course, opportunities to investigate application of various subject matter will be provided in weekly laboratory sessions. Topics will include: properties and states of matter, chemical reactions, multiple forms of energy (i.e. electrical, magnetic, sound, light, and heat), space and time, and the evolution of the universe.

PHYS1003 “Life, the Universe, and Everything: An Introduction to Wu Li”: A Conceptual Physics Course 3 cr.

This course is designed to introduce students on a conceptual level, to a large scope of physics, from classical mechanics to quantum theory. The course is designed as a 3-credit, non-lab science course. The emphasis will be on the broad concepts underlying the patterns and principles of natural phenomena. The applications and worked examples of real-life scenarios will be presented to ground the students and provide contextual meaning for the theories presented.  Prerequisite: MATH1200 or MATH1300.

PHYS2001 Physics I 4 cr.

This is an introductory algebra based course.  The course introduces natural laws of physics which covers linear and circular motion, gravitational and frictional forces, rotational motion, work and energy, momentum, fluids, thermal physics, and wave motion. Prerequisite: MATH1200 Algebra.

PHYS2002 Physics II 4 cr.

Students will be introduced to the laws of physics which apply to electricity, magnetism, optics and nuclear energy. Special emphasis will placed on the relevance of other basic science material to such topics as nerve conduction, sensory transduction, diagnostic techniques (i.e. ultrasound, NMR, EKG, etc.), and nuclear medicine. Prerequisite: C or better in PHYS2001.

PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology 3 cr.

An introduction to the basic concepts and fundamental principles of human behavior using the historical background of psychology as a foundation, and present theory and research as a tool to explore principles of learning, human development motivation, stress, personality, interpersonal skills and mental health.

PSYC1002 Developmental Child Psychology 3 cr.

This course examines the major child development theories and research; their practical implications for parents, educators, and child care workers. Physical, cognitive, language, social personality, and moral development from conception through middle childhood are the focus of this course. Current issues such as the working parent, child abuse, divorce, etc. are explored and discussed.

PSYC1003 Basic Concepts and Principles in Applied Behavior Analysis 3 cr.

This course is the first in a three-course sequence that, when successfully completed in conjunction with specific fieldwork requirements, prepares the participant to sit for national board certification examination at the associates level in applied behavior analysis (BCABA). The course will provide an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis, along with a discussion of some of the ethical standards within the field.

PSYC1013 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis 6 cr.

This practicum is designed to provide students with the supervised independent fieldwork to meet the experience requirements that, in conjunction with the ABA course sequence, will allow the student to sit for board certification as an associate behavior analyst (BCABA) through the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). Students are placed with an agency that provides ABA services where they will work approximately 24 hours a week over a 14 week semester. As part of the practicum, the student will attend a group supervision session on campus every other week and be observed by an individual supervisor at their practicum site on the alternate weeks. An additional fee of $1,000 will be charged for this course.

PSYC1107 Human Growth and Development 3 cr.

This course will emphasize the biological, psychosocial, cognitive, sexual, cultural, and moral development of the individual from conception through old age. The theories of Freud, Erikson, Piaget, Kohlberg, Kubler-Ross and other prominent psychologists will be applied to specific problems in the developmental process.

PSYC1500 Mental Health First Aid 1 cr.

This course is a 15 hour course that includes the 8-hour certification training for Mental Health First Aid. Therefore, participants successfully completing the course will be certified in Mental Health First Aid. This course is designed to give participants the key skills to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis. Evidence behind the MHFA program demonstrates that it makes people feel more comfortable managing a crisis situation and builds mental health literacy — helping participants identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illness.

PSYC2001 Psychology of Adjustment 3 cr.

Discusses circumstances everyone faces, from birth to death. Topics include loneliness and love, turning points, friendship, human sexuality, marriage lifestyles, and the process of aging and death.

PSYC2002 Psychology of Personality 3 cr.  “Course is offered during the Fall of even numbered years”

Major theoretical approaches to understanding personality including psychodynamic, humanistic, and cognitive as well as the less traditional Gestalt and Reichian approaches are critically examined. Theoretical material will be applied to real-life experiences in a variety of experiential formats. Prerequisite: PSYC1001.

PSYC2003 Behavioral Assessment & Data Collection Display and Interpretation 3 cr.

This course is the second in a three-course sequence that, when successfully completed in conjunction with specific fieldwork requirements, prepares the participant to sit for national board certification examination at the associates level in applied behavior analysis (BCABA). The course will teach the student how to conduct descriptive behavioral assessments, and how to display and interpret data in single-subject designs. Prerequisite: PSYC1003.

PSYC2013 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis 6 cr.

This practicum is designed to provide students with the supervised independent fieldwork to meet the experience requirements that, in conjunction with the ABA course sequence, will allow the student to sit for board certification as an associate behavior analyst (BCABA) through the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). Students are placed with an agency that provides ABA services where they will work approximately 24 hours a week over a 14 week semester. As part of the practicum, the student will attend a group supervision session on campus every other week and be observed by an individual supervisor at their practicum site on the alternate weeks. An additional fee of $1,000 will be charged for this course.

PSYC2105 Social Psychology 3 cr.

This course provides the student with a working knowledge of how social situations affect behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. Topics include attraction, attitudes, prejudice, social
roles, aggression, social perception and group dynamics. Readings will explore theories, research and application. Prerequisite: PSYC1001.

PSYC2107 Experimental Social Psychology 3 cr.

This course will introduce students to basic and applied research and experimental research methods in social psychology.  Students will read theory and research relevant to the following areas:  self-esteem, romantic relationships and attraction, group processes, stereotyping and prejudice, conformity and obedience, attitudes and persuasion, and judgment biases.  Students will learn to read and critically evaluate social psychological research while also learning to formulate their own research questions and create methodology to test these questions.  The course will emphasize the importance of applied research and will introduce students to fields in which social psychological research is used to solve real world problems (e.g., economics, sports, legal system, business and industry).  Prerequisite:  PSYC1001.

PSYC2110 Cultural Competence for Human Service Workers 3 cr.

This course prepares human service workers in developing awareness and skills to provide culturally competent services to meet the needs of a changing population. Students examine three core principles: the worker must be self-reflective and examine biases within themselves and their profession; the worker must have core knowledge about minority group value systems, beliefs about health and personal problems, histories, traditions and natural systems of support inherent in one’s culture; and the worker must be able to demonstrate an integration of this knowledge and personal reflection with practice skills.

PSYC2203 Understanding Diversity 3 cr.

In the United States, the rapidly changing demographics of the population have increased cultural diversity at all levels in all segments of society. The course will incorporate discussion of gender, socioeconomic status, religion, race, and ethnicity, as they affect various aspects of interpersonal interactions. Students will work “from the inside-out”, learning to recognize the impact of their own cultures on their existing world views, and then comparing their cultural assumptions to those of people from other groups with the goal of developing more positive relations across cultures. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or SOCI1001

PSYC2205 A Place Called Home 3 cr.

We will explore the image of “home” from various perspectives including the visual arts, psychology, literature, architecture, spirituality, culture and history.  Using these various frames of reference, students will deepen their capacity to reflect on their life experience and the way they make meaning in their lives. Readings and activities will be designed to let “home” be the catalyst for releasing the imagination, encouraging students to pursue in depth their own exterior and interior realities.

PSYC2300 Adolescents At-Risk 3 cr. (previously Adolescent Psychology)  “Course is offered during the Fall of even numbered years”

Theories of adolescent psychosexual, psychosocial, cognitive and biological development will be presented.  The application of these theories and issues to understanding delinquency and drug abuse during adolescence will be discussed along with the reading of the pertinent psychological literature in these areas.  Prerequisite:  PSYC1002 or PSYC1107.

PSYC2303 Psychopharmacology for Counselors 3 cr.

A practical introduction to psychotropic medications, providing information about how commonly prescribed medications are used and how they work in the human body.  This course examines modern drug treatment for mental disorders including psychosis, mood disorders, and addictions, and addresses different classes of drugs in conjunction with diagnostic factors, effectiveness, side effects, risk factors and biological actions.  Prerequisites:  PSYC1001; BIOL1001, BIOL1002, or BIOL2503, BIOL2504.

PSYC2400 Forensic Psychology 3 cr.

This course considers the range of topics that are of concern both to psychologists and members of the legal profession.  Many legal issues involve questions that are psychological in nature, referring to human behaviors and/or mental processes.  For example, what factors are influential in the decisions made by juries?  To what extent are eyewitness identifications reliable?  When is a confession voluntary?  When is a criminal defendant competent to stand trial?  When may a criminal defendant be considered insane?  What types of psychological defenses can a criminal defendant use in court?  What issues are important in the treatment of the mentally ill?  How much discretion should judges have in criminal sentencing?  Psychology offers a new approach to these types of issues, based on scientific research and empirical knowledge.  In this course we will investigate how psychologists work within the legal system as social scientists, consultants, and expert witnesses and how psychological theories, research data, techniques, and methods can enhance and contribute to our understanding of the judicial system.  Prerequisite:  PSYC1001

PSYC2405 Correctional Psychology 3 cr.

Correctional psychology refers to the application of psychological research and theory to the field of corrections.  This course will consider theory and research relevant to the following areas:  perceptions of offenses and offenders, offender treatment and recidivism, and the responsibilities and occupational challenges facing correctional officers.  This course will explore social judgment and decision-making within corrections in the context of interrogations, plea negotiations, sentencing, and parole.  Students will also examine the efficacy of a restorative justice approach to correctional issues, including initiatives focused on improving the functionality of prisons, repairing the victim-offender relationship, and decreasing recidivism.  Prerequisite:  PSYC1001.

PSYC2505 Community Systems and Intervention – Students who need this course should take PSYC2808 Psychological Tests and Measures

PSYC2506 Case Management Practice 3 cr.

Students will explore the essentials of case management with an emphasis on systems thinking.  Students review the history of case management in human services, and examine the fundamental models, principles and components of case management in various human service settings, with an emphasis on current issues, trends and approaches.  Topics include service delivery, crisis intervention, liaising between and among service providers.

PSYC2603 Brain and Behavior 3 cr.

This survey course examines how biological factors influence behavior. Topics include organization of the brain, how the nervous system works, how body chemistry affects emotions, and genetic/temperament factors. These topics are applied to normal and abnormal behavior such as learning disabilities, sexuality and psychotic disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and any TWO of the following :  BIOL1001, BIOL1002, BIOL2503, BIOL2504, BIOL1005, BIOL1006.

PSYC2705 Concepts and Principles in Applied Behavior Analysis 3 cr.

This course is the first in a four course sequence that, when successfully completed in conjunction with specific fieldwork requirements, prepares the participant to sit for national board certification examination at the assistant level in applied behavior analysis (BCaBA). The course will provide an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis.  Prerequisites: PSYC1001.

PSYC2710 Assessment and Measurement in Behavior Analysis 3 cr.

This course is the second in a four course sequence that, when successfully completed in conjunction with specific fieldwork requirements, prepares the participant to sit for national board certification examination at the assistant level in applied behavior analysis (BCaBA). The course will teach the student how to conduct descriptive behavioral assessments, how to use various measures, and how to display and interpret data on Excel graphs.  Prerequisite: PSYC2705.

PSYC2806 Educational Psychology 3 cr.

Theories of learning, instruction, curriculum, assessment and evaluation will be explored as they apply to pedagogy in a variety of educational contexts. The course will focus on behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic learning theories as well as the learning principles that will serve as a general background for becoming an effective, reflective educator.  Prerequisite: A 1000-level psychology course.

PSYC2808 Psychological Tests and Measures 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to the uses of psychological tests and to the techniques of test construction and evaluation.  Topics include:  a survey of common tests in the areas of general classification, differential testing of abilities and measurement of personality characteristics.  Prerequisites:  PSYC1001, MATH1200, and MATH2200.

PSYC3003 Strategies for Changing Behavior 3 cr.

This course is the third in a three-course sequence that, when successfully completed in conjunction with specific fieldwork requirements, prepares the participant to sit for national board certification examination at the associates level in applied behavior analysis (BCABA). This course will review methodologies used to design ethical and effective behavior analytic interventions. Prerequisites: PSYC1003 and PSYC2003.

PSYC3004 Writing for Psychology 3 cr.

This course focuses on the fundamentals of scientific writing and professional written communication relevant to the field of human services/psychology.  The course involves students in the writing of literature reviews, communication of statistics, and modification of research results for oral communication and poster presentations.  For psychology majors only.  Prerequisite:  ENGL1003.

PSYC3013 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis 6 cr.

This practicum is designed to provide students with the supervised independent fieldwork to meet the experience requirements that, in conjunction with the ABA course sequence, will allow the student to sit for board certification as an associate behavior analyst (BCABA) through the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). Students are placed with an agency that provides ABA services where they will work approximately 24 hours a week over a 14 week semester. As part of the practicum, the student will attend a group supervision session on campus every other week and be observed by an individual supervisor at their practicum site on the alternate weeks. An additional fee of $1,000 will be charged for this course.

PSYC3100 Cognitive Psychology 3 cr.

An introduction to how the human mind processes information. Topics include perception, attention, memory, learning and problem solving. The related topics of intelligence are covered. Practical applications in educational and clinical settings are considered. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 and 31+ earned credits.

PSYC3200 Psychology of Family 3 cr.

This course surveys psychological issues related to the family. Family is defined to include diverse forms. Current theory and research are applied to topics such as partner selection, roles and relationships, stress and coping, domestic violence, and addictions. Prerequisite: PSYC1001.

PSYC3300 Addictions Counseling 3 cr.

This course is designed to provide students with a specific skill base for assessment and counseling of persons struggling with addictions.  Students will also be introduced to the theory and empirically validated treatment approaches specifically developed for the special populations of those who are dually diagnosed, in chronic pain, and are adolescents and their families.  Emphasis will be placed on developing competency in intake and assessment interviewing, behavioral treatment planning, and development of basic understanding of psychopharmacology as it applies to addiction counseling.  Prerequisites:  EXSC3205, PSYC3004, and PSYC3400 or PSYC3402 which may be taken concurrently and will require a waiver.

PSYC3301 The 12 Core Functions of the Substance Abuse Counselor 3 cr.

This course is split into two sections; Core Functions of Counseling and Group Treatment. The course provides the student with the 12 core functions of addiction counseling and gives the student the fundamentals of running groups for addicted clients. The intent of introducing students to the core functions is to help them develop skills and competencies that will help them learn how to take clients through the treatment process from screening and intake, to treatment planning and counseling, ending with referral (if needed). The class will also introduce the student to the most widely used modality in substance abuse treatment, the group. We will explore the transtheoretical model of behavior change which is widely viewed as the evidence based modality that consistently produces positive outcomes.  Prerequisite: PSYC1001.

PSYC3305 Group Counseling 3 cr.

This course will expose students to the theories and techniques of working with clients in groups. The course will focus on group work as a method, and its relationship to other counseling techniques. Students will gain theoretical and experiential knowledge of group process, including leadership, membership, developmental stages, and types of groups. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently or subsequent to PSYC2002 and PSYC3400 or PSYC3402.

PSYC3400 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr.

This course studies important issues in mental/health illness. Problems in defining abnormality are discussed. Biological, psychodynamic, behavioral and family systems are examined. The wide spectrum of abnormal behavior from mild to severe as well as current trends in the treatment of these disorders, are discussed. This course may include field trips. Prerequisite: PSYC1001.

PSYC3402 Child Psychopathology 3 cr.  “Course is offered during the Fall of even numbered years”

The goal of this course is to examine psychological theory, research and practice as it relates to the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of psychological disorder of children. Prominent theories of developmental psychopathology will be integrated with current research in the child behavior disorders. Specific topics to be covered include attention-deficit disorder, conduct problems, fears and phobias, depression, autism and childhood-onset schizophrenia, eating disorders, sleep disorders, and elimination disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 or PSYC1107.

PSYC3603 Positive Psychology 3 cr.

Positive Psychology is the scientific study of optimal human functioning. This course will consider human functioning at several levels, including biological, experiential, personal, relational, and cultural. The pillars of Positive Psychology as proposed by Dr. Seligman, the pleasant life, the good life and its corresponding signature strengths, and the meaningful life will all be explored. Enhancing the quality of life through Czikszentmihalyi’s groundbreaking work on FLOW will expand the initial concepts of Positive Psychology. The topics of emotional intelligence, mindfulness, and schema therapy, based on the latest research in neuroscience and cognitive psychology, will all be addressed in their relationship to optimal human functioning.  Prerequisites:  PSYC1001 and 61+ earned credits.

PSYC3605 Zoobiquity Theory 3 cr.

This course explores how animal and human commonality can be used to diagnose, treat, and heal patients of all species. Drawing on the latest research in both medical and veterinary science, as well as evolutionary and health psychology, students develop an integrated, interdisciplinary understanding of physical and behavioral health, including psychiatry, pediatrics, cardiology, gastroenterology, and many other sub-specialties.  Prerequisites:  PSYC1001; BIOL1001 and BIOL1002, or BIOL1005 and BIOL1006, or BIOL2503 and BIOL2504.  Minimum 60 earned credits.

PSYC3700 Sports Psychology 3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to the psychological variables that affect motivation, goal setting performance, anxiety and aggression in sport. Prerequisite: PSYC1001.

PSYC3705 Beginning Strategies for Changing Behavior 3 cr.

This course is the third in a four course sequence that, when successfully completed in conjunction with specific fieldwork requirements, prepares the participant to sit for national board certification examination at the assistant level in applied behavior analysis (BCaBA).  The course examines ethical issues faced by those working in the field of behavior analysis, introduces the experimental designs, and then begins the review of methodologies used to design ethical and effective behavior analytic interventions.  Prerequisites: PSYC2705, PSYC2710.

PSYC3710 Advanced Strategies for Changing Behavior 3 cr.

This course is the fourth in a four course sequence that, when successfully completed in conjunction with specific fieldwork requirements, prepares the participant to sit for national board certification examination at the assistant level in applied behavior analysis (BCaBA). This course continues the review of methodologies used to design ethical and effective behavior analytic interventions. In addition, the course reviews behavior changes systems and the management and supervision of the behavioral services.  Prerequisites: PSYC2705, PSYC2710, PSYC3705.

PSYC3902 Psychology Internship I and Seminar 3 cr. (offered in fall semester)

This course is based on a service-learning model, and provides students with an introduction to the experience of working in a professional capacity in a human service setting. Students will complete 150 hours of related work at the placement site. Hours may include direct consumer contact, professional training’s, supervision meetings, attendance at interdisciplinary meetings, home visitations, supervised assessments, and completion of related documentation. Students will receive on-site supervision on a regular basis, and will attend a weekly seminar on campus. Students are expected to work with the course instructor a minimum of 1 semester in advance to select a placement setting, arrange for initial interviews, and establish specific learning goals tailored to the individual student’s needs. Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC3400 or PSYC3402, a minimum GPA of 3.0 and permission of the internship coordinator.

PSYC3903 Psychology Internship II and Seminar 3 cr. (offered in spring semester)

Supervised fieldwork in community agencies, hospitals, courts, or other related settings.  Students will complete 150 hours of work at the placement site. Students also meet with faculty and other internship participants for discussion, integrating their practical experience with psychological theory and research. Prerequisites: PSYC3400 or PSYC3402; 2.0 GPA in upper-level Psychology courses and permission of internship coordinator.

PSYC4001 Research Methods – Students who need this course should take PSYC4005

PSYC4005 Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences with Lab 4 cr.

This course provides an introduction to the major research methods in the behavioral sciences, to include survey, experimental and field research.  The logic, design and execution of the research process are considered with concern for elementary analysis of data.  Laboratory exercises in data analysis and interpretation will include introduction to SPSS.  Prerequisites:  PSYC2107, MATH2200.  Students with an A in MATH1200 may take MATH2200 concurrently, through a prerequisite waiver.

PSYC4007 Advanced Research Methods in Psychology 1 cr.

This one-credit course may be repeated once for a total of two credits.  The course is designed to engage students in various aspects of psychological research.  Specific content will vary widely, reflecting the variety of questions and methods used in psychological research:  collecting data, coding data, running statistical analyses, writing in APA style, and critically reflecting on research outcomes.  All experiences will be aimed at providing substantial hands-on involvement in the research process and background reading in the research area.  All students will be expected to attend a professional research conference with his/her research team.  Prerequisite:  Previous or concurrent enrollment in ANSC4700 or JUST4001 or LGLS4100 or MGMT4000 or MKTG4001 or SOCI4001 or PSYC4001 and permission of instructor.  Concurrent enrollment will require a waiver.

PSYC4200 Contemporary Issues in Psychology 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.  Prerequisites:  ENGL1003; PSYC1001 or SOCI1001.

PSYC4300 Substance Abuse Treatment in Groups 3 cr.  (previously Substance Abuse Counseling in Groups)

This course will provide students with theoretical and practical frameworks for developing skills in the area of substance abuse counseling methods, treatment modalities, and referral systems and procedures. Specific issues involving clients with substance dependency will be examined and will include substance dependent older adults, dually diagnosed clients, and patients with physical challenges. Students will also be exposed to basic psychopharmacology as it relates to addictions treatment.  Ethics, assessment and treatment interventions will be emphasized.  Prerequisites: EXSC3205, and PSYC3300 or PSYC3400 or PSYC3402

PSYC4301 Counseling Children 3 cr.  “Course is offered during the Spring of even numbered years”

This course sets the stage for understanding the child and family of today and tomorrow – their personas and the social, cultural, educational, and psychological environments that help shape them. Course focus will be on combining and integrating counseling skills with the therapeutic process, emphasizing how the counselor relates to the child and parent. Emphasis is placed on the process and practice specifically applied to the counseling of children and their parents. Course topics include problems in society and their effect on children, establishing a therapeutic relationship, choosing treatment strategies, counseling the developing child, individual and group counseling approaches, behavioral approaches with children, and counseling with parents. Prerequisites: PSYC3004, and PSYC3400 or PSYC3402.

PSYC4306 Counseling Theory and Practice 3 cr.  “Course is offered during the Spring of odd numbered years”

This course offers an overview of several contemporary theoretical models of helping, and covers the skill needed to begin professional interviewing and counseling. Ethics and multicultural understanding are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSYC3004, and PSYC3400 or PSYC3402.

PSYC4400 Criminal Minds 3 cr.  “Course is offered in even numbered years”

This course provides opportunity to study of the psychological bases and dynamics of criminal behavior.  Topics to be discussed include the “antisocial personality”; the “psychopath”; psychosis and crime; alcoholism and drug abuse; the adolescent offender; the female offender; and “sex” offenders.  Prerequisite:  PSYC3400.

PSYC4600 Senior Seminar in Psychology 3 cr.

This is a capstone course requiring students to engage in an in-depth examination of a psychological issue. The student will carry out an original research project, provide an educational presentation, and produce a career portfolio. Prerequisites: PSYC4001 or PSYC4005.

PSYC4902 Psychology Honors Practicum 9 cr.

Students will engage in a minimum of 420 hours of supervised practicum at an advanced level, in professional settings geared toward individual student interests. Practicum students are required to engage in 35-40 hours of professional service per week, for minimum of 12 weeks. Students will be assigned to site supervisors and specific experiences will be tailored to individual interests. Students will complete a portfolio related to their experience, and will present a formal case study or empirical study to the Department of Teacher Education and Family studies upon completion of practicum hours. Students are expected to meet with the field placement coordinator for a minimum of 1 hour every two weeks. On site supervision is provided more frequently.

PSYC4903 Practicum in Addictions Counseling 6 cr.  “An additional fee of $1000 will be charged for this course”

This course is designed to provide students with the supervised practical training requirements that, in conjunction with specific courses and work experience, allow the student to sit for board certification as a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor II through the Massachusetts Board of Registration/Office of Health and Human Services.  Students are placed with an agency that provides addictions education and counseling, where they will work approximately 24 hours a week over a 14 week semester.  As part of the practicum, the student will attend a group supervision and seminar class on campus every other week and be observed by an individual supervisor at their practicum site on the alternate weeks.  Prerequisites:  EXSC3205, and PSYC3300 or PSYC3400 or PSYC3402, and a minimum GPA of 2.0.

S

» SOCI1001 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.
» SOCI2001 Criminology 3 cr.
» SOCI2100 Women of the World: Health, Social Challenges, and Solutions  3 cr.
» SOCI2400 Social Problems 3 cr.
» SOCI3001 Individual and Society 3 cr.
» SOCI3100 Juvenile Delinquency 3 cr.
» SOCI3110 Human Geography 3 cr.
» SOCI3200 Deviance and Social Control 3 cr.
» SOCI3600 Global Poverty and Economic Inequality 3 cr.
» SOCI4001 Data Analysis 3 cr.
» SPAN1001 Conversational Spanish I 3 cr.
» SPAN1002 Conversational Spanish II 3 cr.
» SPMG2302 Introduction to Sports Management 3 cr.
» SPMG2600 Sport Administration and Governance 3 cr.
» SPMG3100 Sports Facility Management 3 cr.
» SPMG3300 Sport Marketing and Event Management 3 cr.
» SPMG3700 Sports Management Seminar 3 cr.
» SPMG4200 Legal and Ethical Issues in Sports 3 cr.
» SPMG4500 Sport Finance and Economics 3 cr.
» SPMG4900 Practicum in Sports Management 3 cr.
» SPMG4901 Internship in Sports Management 3 cr.

SOCI1001 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.

This course explores the scientific dimensions of the sociological enterprise. Students are introduced to orienting concepts like culture, socialization and role; the constructed nature of human meaning systems; and theory building in sociology.

SOCI2001 Criminology 3 cr.

Crime and the law are examined from diverse theoretical perspectives. Students use computer applications to interpret national crime statistics and the results of self-report and victim surveys. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or SOCI1001.

SOCI2100 Women of the World: Health, Social Challenges, and Solutions  3 cr.

In this course, students study the patterns of inequality in various countries and how these inequalities affect women’s health, education, and power.  Students analyze women’s critical health and social issues that influence their life experience, including those of children and men.  Through lecture, discussion, writing, guest speakers, field trips, and films students have the opportunity to examine their own world views and learn how they can effect positive change in the world today.  Prerequisite:  PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 or SOCI1001.
Note:  This course meets the global diversity course requirement.

SOCI2400 Social Problems 3 cr.

This course will provide students with insight into social problems by examining specific social problems from both a sociological/adult view and from a child’s perspective. Issues to be covered include, but are not limited to, gender identity and socialization, violence in society, media influences, substance abuse, and family-related problems such as child abuse and neglect, and family violence. Special emphasis will be given to the current legal and socioeconomic trends that affect both adults and the education of young children, including anti-bias curriculum issues, the changing family, and political influences. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or SOCI1001.

SOCI3001 Individual and Society 3 cr.

American society is studied for its impact on the formation of individual biographies. Relationships among modernization, culture, identity and personality are examined in detail. All topics are grounded in theories depicting the interplay of structure and action in everyday life. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or SOCI1001.

SOCI3100 Juvenile Delinquency 3 cr.

This course investigates the history and causes of American delinquency. Special consideration is given to cultural definitions of the child, their historical transformation and their impact on the criminal justice system. Theories of delinquency are examined in detail. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or SOCI1001.

SOCI3110 Human Geography 3 cr.

This course focuses on the ways through which all places on Earth are interconnected and how the human use of the Earth’s surface varies over space.  Major topics covered will be:  the human perception of earth space and the ways people give order to space; the growth and distribution of human population; the localization and spatial characteristics of patterns of settlement and land use; geopolitics and colonialism; environmental geography; the geography of economic development and modernization; the principles of the analysis of spatial diffusion; spatial aspects of retail marketing; and the geographic analysis of gender issues, racism, poverty, sports, religion, and cultural nuances.  Prerequisites:  SOCI 1001 and HUMN 2103.

SOCI3200 Deviance and Social Control 3 cr.

This course examines the forms and causes of individual, professional and organizational deviance. The role of society in the definition and management of misconduct is evaluated. Examples of deviant activities that may be considered include suicide, mental illness, alcoholism, cults, white-collar crime and political corruption. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or SOCI1001.

SOCI3600 Global Poverty and Economic Inequality 3 cr.

This course covers contemporary methods in defining and measuring poverty worldwide, sociological theories of poverty and economic inequality, the nature, causes, and consequences of poverty, and ways to alleviate poverty.  This is a service-learning course where students will spend one week in an off-campus experience which will require travel, attending presentations and participating in hands-on activities related to hunger and homelessness.  Prerequisite:  SOCI2400 or HUMN2103.  NOTE:  A fee of up to $1,000 will be assessed for this course.

SOCI4001 Data Analysis 3 cr.

The fundamentals of quantitative analysis are introduced in a computer environment. Analytical procedures are presented as tools for exploration and discovery and as tools for the verification of research hypotheses. The course provides experience in the use of database, spreadsheet and statistical programs. Problems for analysis are found in both institutional and social research settings. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 or SOCI1001, and MATH2200.

SPAN1001 Conversational Spanish I 3 cr.

The course is designed to develop the student’s knowledge of the four foundational skills of a foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Course methodology is based on audio-lingual approach, using guided conversation and oral and written dialogues to introduce grammatical structures. Oral and written drills, individual oral assignments, impromptu discussions and readings serve to reinforce learned materials. Emphasis is on enhancing the student’s conversational ability. Course content covers a variety of topics, culturally enriching, practical and flexible to the needs of the student.

SPAN1002 Conversational Spanish II 3 cr.

This course is designed to further develop the student’s ability to speak and understand Spanish. Conversation is stressed. Readings are used as further basis of conversation and grammar review. Prerequisite: SPAN1001.

SPMG2302 Introduction to Sports Management 3 cr.

This course is designed to give students basic skills to develop and implement an employee health/fitness program. Emphasis is placed on facility development management, programming and leadership procedures.

SPMG2600 Sport Administration and Governance 3 cr.

This course covers the administrative elements of human resource management, motivation, interpersonal communication and staff development/evaluation as they relate to sports. Students will analyze the governing organizations of sports at the recreational, secondary, intercollegiate, professional, international, amateur, and Olympic levels.

SPMG3100 Sports Facility Management 3 cr.

This course deals with the business side of sports programs and facility marketing and management. It addresses the issues of facility type, location, scheduling, construction and maintenance, as well as the management and conduct of recreation programs for nonprofit organizations, colleges and universities, and profit-making enterprises like health/fitness centers, country clubs/resorts and sport retail operations.  Prerequisite: SPMG2302 or SPMG2600.

SPMG3300 Sport Marketing and Event Management 3 cr.

Students will apply the fundamental principles of marketing to the world of sports and event management. They will learn how sports marketing differs from other types of marketing in terms of target marketing, product differentiation and positioning, and promotion. They will explore the various ways that organizations plan and manage sporting and other types of events, and they will gain an understanding of the economic impact of, as well as possible careers in, the sports industry. Case studies and current events will provide an opportunity to put the course material into practice.  Prerequisites: MKTG2104 and SPMG2302.

SPMG3700 Sports Management Seminar 3 cr.

This course is intended to provide the student with the knowledge and understanding of the operations of various public and private sports facilities. This includes both the business and the athletic/recreational aspects of the organizations. Included are many speakers from various sports organizations, field trips and individual student projects connected to selected facilities in the area.  Prerequisites:  MGMT1000, SPMG2302.

SPMG4200 Legal and Ethical Issues in Sports 3 cr.

This course will provide the sports professional with an understanding of the legal system as a whole and the unique legal problems and responsibilities faced in managing a sports activity. The sports professional will be educated to identify potential legal liability and to avoid unnecessary legal risks. Prerequisite: LGLS2205, SPMG2302 or SPMG2600.

SPMG4500 Sport Finance and Economics 3 cr.

Students will analyze financial and economic concepts applied to sports environments. Sport enterprises will be viewed as economic systems which must respond to changes in supply, demand, and market trends. Students will explore fundraising for various constituencies as well as overall budgeting and fiscal management of sports organizations.  Prerequisites: MATH1200; and SPMG2302 or SPMG2600.

SPMG4900 Practicum in Sports Management 3 cr.

This is a 150-hour supervised field experience under the direct guidance of a qualified professional manager. Assignments are made with a member of the department faculty. This offers students an opportunity to gain substantial practical experience within their major.

SPMG4901 Internship in Sports Management 3 cr.

This is a 150-hour supervised field experience under the direct guidance of a qualified professional manager. Assignments are made with a member of the department faculty. This offers students an opportunity to gain substantial practical experience within their major.

V

» VTSC1101 Clinical Veterinary Experience I 4 cr.
» VTSC1102 Clinical Veterinary Experience II 4 cr.
» VTSC1200 Veterinary Pharmacology 2 cr.
» VTSC2000 Laboratory Animal Science 2 cr.
» VTSC2001 Veterinary Radiology 2 cr.
» VTSC2101 Veterinary Hematology 3 cr.
» VTSC2102 Clinical Pathology 3 cr.
» VTSC2201 Farm Animal Skills 2 cr.
» VTSC2500 Veterinary Anesthesia & Surgery 4 cr.
» VTSC2900 Externship Module I  2 cr. 
» VTSC2902 Practical Experience I  1 cr.
» VTSC2904 Practical Experience II  1 cr.
» VTSC30UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.
» VTSC3100 Laboratory Animal Management 3 cr.
» VTSC3200 Clinical Animal Behavior 3 cr.
» VTSC3300 Disaster Preparedness for Animals 3 cr.
» VTSC3400 Immunology 3 cr.
» VTSC3401 Pathophysiology of Disease 3 cr.
» VTSC3402 Advanced Veterinary Nursing Techniques 3 cr.
» VTSC3600 Clinical Veterinary Nutrition 3 cr.
» VTSC4102 Laboratory Animal Diseases 3 cr.
» VTSC4401 Companion Animal Diseases 3 cr.
» VTSC4500 Senior Seminar 2 cr.
» VTSC4900 Externship Module II - 3 cr.
» VTSC4901 Externship Module IIIa - 3 cr.
» VTSC4902 Externship Module IIIb - 3 cr.
» VTSC4903 Externship Module IIIc – 3 cr.

VTSC1101 Clinical Veterinary Experience I 4 cr.

Lecture and laboratory introduce the role of the veterinary technician. Medical terminology, principles of animal behavior, basic nursing care, client communication, medical record keeping and career choices are discussed in lecture. Laboratories include animal restraint and handling, nursing skills, physical exams and clinical rotations through the Becker Veterinary Clinic. Students are responsible for completing a kennel duty rotation. Students are required to have a lab coat, name tag, and stethoscope. These may be purchased through the College at a reduced cost or students may provide their own, approved by the course director. Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration.  A grade of C (73%) or better is required in both lecture and lab for graduation from the Veterinary Technology and Science programs. Prerequisite OR corequisite: BIOL1005

VTSC1102 Clinical Veterinary Experience II 4 cr.

This course consists of both lecture and laboratory components which focus, in greater detail, on the aspects of veterinary nursing which were introduced in VTSC1101. These nursing aspects include more advanced techniques such as venipuncture, intravenous catheterization, bandaging, and introduction to electrocardiography. It also encompasses a clinical symptoms approach to common diseases, poisonings and emergency medicine. Students are required to participate in clinical work consisting of rotations through the Becker Veterinary Clinic, laboratory techniques review, and kennel duty.  Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration.  Prerequisite: C (73%) or better in VTSC1101 and BIOL1005; prerequisite OR corequisite: BIOL1006. A grade of C or better is required in both the lecture and laboratory portion for graduation from the Veterinary Technology and Science Programs.

VTSC1200 Veterinary Pharmacology 2 cr.

A study of commonly used drugs in veterinary medicine and their practical application for the veterinary technician. Emphasis on classification of drugs, their uses and side effects; weights and measures; drug dosage calculations; the handling, labeling and dispensing of medications; and pharmacy inventory and maintenance. This course requires a strong background in algebra, the metric system, and an understanding of word problems.  Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration.  Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101, BIOL1005, CHEM1001, and MATH1200 or MATF1002 with concurrent enrollment in MATH1200. A grade of C or better is required for graduation from the Veterinary Technology and Science Programs.

VTSC2000 Laboratory Animal Science 2 cr.

This course introduces the student to the laboratory animal research environment and to the selection, care, and use of laboratory animals. Topics include restraint, identification, husbandry, breeding, nutrition, behavior, and anatomy and physiology of small animal laboratory species. The course also surveys common disease, breeding, housing, governmental regulations, sentinel programs, equipment and research ethics in biomedical research. Laboratories will include animal restraint, physical examination, gavage, injection and sampling techniques, radiology, parasitology, anesthesia, and necropsy as applied to laboratory animals. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in VTSC1101/1102/1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200. Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2001 Veterinary Radiology 2 cr.

Lectures explore the theory and principles of radiology and radiation safety. Laboratories train students in the basic skills of radiology including operating the x-ray machine, manual and automatic film processing, animal restraint and positioning, and special diagnostic techniques. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in VTSC1101/1102/1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200. Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Concentration.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation from the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2101 Veterinary Hematology 3 cr.

The two hours of lecture covers the theory behind laboratory work involved with hematology and clinical chemistry. The 2 hour laboratory provides the hands-on experience in doing clinical laboratory examinations on blood and body fluids.  Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101/1102/1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200. Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration. The student must pass both the lecture and the laboratory sections with a C or better to complete the course with a minimum grade of C, which is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2102 Clinical Pathology 3 cr.

The two hours of lecture will present the theory
behind clinical urinalysis, parasitology and cytology of domestic and
non-domestic species. The two hour laboratory provides clinical experience in
urinalysis, cytological examinations and the various methods used to detect
parasites. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101/1102 and 1200, BIOL1005/1006,
CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200. Open only to Veterinary Technology students and
Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical
and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration. The student must pass both the
lecture and the laboratory sections with a C or better to complete the course
with a minimum grade of C, which is required for graduation in the Veterinary
Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2201 Farm Animal Skills 2 cr.

The student is introduced to five common domestic large animal species. Emphasis is placed on anatomy, restraint, physical examination, nursing care, diagnostic techniques, reproduction and common diseases.  Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101/1102/1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200.  Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2500 Veterinary Anesthesia & Surgery 4 cr.

The two hours of lecture topics include principles of patient evaluation, anesthetic drugs, equipment management, instrumentation, anesthetic pollution safety, surgical nursing, dental diseases, overview of common surgical procedures and anesthetic emergencies. The laboratory consists of 4 hours and emphasizes practical aspects of aseptic technique, patient monitoring, surgical instrumentation, preparation for surgical procedures and dental prophylaxis. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101/1102/1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200. Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration. The student must pass both the lecture and the laboratory sections with a C or better to complete the course with a minimum grade of C, which is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2900 Externship Module I 2 cr.

Offers clinical experience in animal care, medication and treatment of veterinary patients and exposure to diagnostic techniques, technical laboratory skills and record keeping used in veterinary practice. Students perform their externships between the freshman and sophomore years or during intersession for a minimum of 200 hours. Students must have acquired a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in order to participate in externships. Transportation and locating an appropriate externship site are the sole responsibility of the student. The externship site must be pre-approved by the course coordinator prior to the end of the semester preceding the externship. Also, during the semester, students participate in a seminar class. A student who has successfully completed the 200 hour externship but has changed majors may remain in the course to earn the credits.  Students will be withdrawn if the 200 hour externship is not successfully completed and verified prior to the end of the drop/add period.  Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101/1102, VTSC1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200. Open only to Veterinary Technology students and Veterinary Science majors in the Pre-Veterinary Concentration or the Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine Concentration.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2902 Practical Experience I  1 cr.

As part of the second year of the Veterinary Technology curriculum students participate in both exam room sessions in the Lenfest Animal Health Center and in field trips, accompanied by faculty and staff to nearby animal shelters and humane societies. The intent and purpose is for students to practice skills learned in VTSC1101, VTSC1102 and on the externship. A minimum number of sessions will be required of all students, and will be scheduled by staff to fit the students' class schedules and availabilityof facilities. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101/1102, VTSC1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200, VTSC2900 or co-requisite. VTSC2902 and 2904 may be taken concurrently. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC2904 Practical Experience II  1 cr.

This course is a continuation of the experiences in VTSC2902. As part of the second year of the Veterinary Technology curriculum students participate in both exam room sessions in the Lenfest Animal Health Center and in field trips, accompanied by faculty and staff to nearby animal shelters and humane societies. The intent and purpose is for students to practice skills learned in VTSC1101, VTSC1102 and on the externship. A minimum number of sessions will be required of all students, and will be scheduled by staff to fit the students' class schedules and availability of facilities. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1101/1102, VTSC1200, BIOL1005/1006, CHEM1001/1002, and MATH1200, VTSC 2900 or co-requisite. VTSC 2902 and 2904 may be taken concurrently. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Technology and Science programs.

VTSC30UG Special Topics Course 3 cr.

Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum.  Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at the Special Topics Courses page.  Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic.

VTSC3100 Laboratory Animal Management 3 cr.

Introduces scientific and technical information about organizations, associations and regulations that apply to animal laboratory care in a research facility. Specifically details the responsibilities of AALAS, AAALC, FDA, NABR, etc. and defines all standards that must be followed in the organized field of laboratory animal science. Managerial skills and responsibilities needed to oversee the functioning of research institutions are covered in detail. Prerequisite: ANSC2000 or VTSC2000. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program.

VTSC3200 Clinical Animal Behavior 3 cr.

This course takes an in-depth look at animal behavior in a variety of species in subject areas such as communications, social structure, biological rhythms, sexual and maternal behavior, development, learning, training, aggression, enrichment and abnormal behavior as it relates to drugs, pain, medical problems, environmental issues and stress. A variety of evaluation methods will be covered as well. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC1200, VTSC2201, and VTSC2000.  VTSC2000 may be taken concurrently.

VTSC3300 Disaster Preparedness for Animals 3 cr.

This course introduces the student to the issues and tasks involved with disaster preparedness in general as well as the unique situations involved with rescuing and sheltering all types of animals. Various topics will include networking with veterinary facilities, animal shelters, human shelters and municipal authorities. Natural disasters as well as agro-terrorism will be covered. A study of past disasters will be part of the course, to determine what has worked and what has not. An on-line course component presented by FEMA’s National Incident Management System will also be a part of the course.  Prerequisites: Junior status in the Animal Studies Programs. A C or better is required for graduation.

VTSC3400 Immunology 3 cr.

This course surveys the basic principles of immunology with emphasis on knowledge gained from human and animal research.  Topics to be discussed include: innate immunity and complement; antibody structure, antigen recognition; humoral and cell mediated immunity; over-reactive and deficient immune systems; and immunization.  The course instructor assumes that the student has prior knowledge of basic cell biology, cell physiology, and microbiology. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC 2101/2102 and BIOL 2502 OR permission of instructor.  A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program if used as a Veterinary Science elective.

VTSC3401 Pathophysiology of Disease 3 cr.

Presented in an organ system format, this course provides a comparative approach to animal health and disease of the major domestic animal species. Eight major systems will be explored (integumentary, musculoskeletal, neurosensory, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal and reproductive). The anatomy and physiology shared by all animals is reviewed with the comparative differences emphasized. Clinical signs of organ dysfunction, pathophysiology, diagnostic tests and treatment/prevention strategies are discussed using examples of selected important diseases. The course instructor assumes that the student has prior knowledge of basic physiological principles, common diagnostic procedures, and common therapeutic practices in veterinary medicine. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC2000/2101/2102/2201. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program. Offered in the fall only.

VTSC3402 Advanced Veterinary Nursing Techniques 3 cr.

This course is designed to give the veterinary science student interested in clinical medicine a more advanced understanding of diagnostic tests and therapeutic procedures. Selected topics such as various intravenous catheterization techniques, CPR, oncology therapeutics, physical therapy, fluid therapy, and advanced diagnostic imaging will be discussed. The laboratory is designed to give the student a ‘hands-on’ approach to these techniques. The course instructor assumes that the student has prior knowledge of basic physiological principles, common diagnostic procedures and common therapeutic practices in veterinary medicine. Prerequisites:  C or better in VTSC2000/2001/2101/2102/2201/2500. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program. Usually offered in the spring.

VTSC3600 Clinical Veterinary Nutrition 3 cr.

This course covers nutrients and their function in the health of the domestic, lab, and exotic species of animals. The first half of the semester provides the backbone for the second half by discussing nutrients, feeds and rations, and commercial diets of healthy animals. The second half of the semester deals with the role nutrition plays in certain diseases of dogs and cats. Different feeding modalities will also be covered in the second half of the semester. Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM3003. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program. Usually offered in the fall.

VTSC4102 Laboratory Animal Diseases 3 cr.

This course introduces the common diseases and conditions of common lab animal species. Clinical signs, diagnostic tests, recommended treatments and possible prevention techniques in the research facility will be discussed. Students will gain knowledge of zoonotic and public health concerns, and understand the impact these diseases and conditions can have on the research being conducted. Pre-requisites: ANSC 3401, ANSC 3402, and VTSC 3100; or VTSC 3401; or permission of the instructor. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science Pre-Veterinary concentration and Clinical and Laboratory Animal Medicine concentration.

VTSC4401 Companion Animal Diseases 3 cr.

This course introduces the more common diseases, clinical signs, diagnostic tests, recommended treatments, and prevention strategies. The companion animal species covered in this course include dog, cat, horse, pig, bird, reptile and ruminant. Prerequisites: C or better in VTSC3401. A grade of C or better is required for graduation from the Veterinary Science program.

VTSC4500 Senior Seminar 2 cr.

This senior capstone course is designed to provide a weekly seminar series presented by the students. The seminars are presented in an informal setting to permit free exchange between the students and the presenters. A wide range of topics are discussed to introduce the student to career opportunities and activities in various fields of medicine and research. The student is expected to do journal research and write and present reports based on their findings. Students may be required to participate in the yearly Vet Tech continuing education seminar. A case study with references is also required. Prerequisite or Corequisite: VTSC4900/4901 or 4902. A grade of C or better is required for graduation in the Veterinary Science program.

VTSC4900 Externship Module II - 3 cr.

This is the first part of the basic clinical experience requirement for all veterinary science students. Module II consists of 400 hours which must be performed in two or more Clinical, Zoo, Wildlife, Research, on campus or other externship sites approved by the Outreach Program Liaison, with a minimum of 100 hours at each site. The student can begin these hours following completion of all 2000 level Veterinary Science courses and should register for the course in the semester in which they expect to complete the required hours. All 400 hours of Module II must be completed prior to beginning the Module IIIa Externship. Prerequisite: C or better in VTSC 2000, 2001, 2101, 2102, 2201, 2500, 2900, 2902 and 2904. A grade of C or better is required for graduation.

VTSC4901 Externship Module IIIa - 3 cr.

Module IIIa of the externship is a structured program that provides students with career-related experiences and education under direct supervision at approved externship sites. Students may choose one of 3 options for a total of 3, 6, or 9 credits. The minimum for Module III is 200 hrs, representing the 3 credits of VTSC4901.  The externship may be completed in one semester or spread across multiple semesters. Students should register for the module in the semester in which they expect to complete the required hours. The final Module III Externship hours are meant to be taken concurrently with the capstone course VTSC 4500 Senior Seminar. These hours may be completed at any of the above and previously described Clinical/Zoo/Wildlife/ Research or other approved sites. Prerequisite or corequisite: VTSC4900. A grade of C or better is required for graduation.

VTSC4902 Externship Module IIIb - 3 cr.

An additional 200 hrs externship, combined with VTSC4901 for a total of 400 module III hours. Prerequisite or co-requisite: VTSC4901. A grade of C or better is required for graduation.

VTSC4903 Externship Module IIIc – 3 cr.

An additional 200 hrs externship, combined with VTSC4901 and 4902 for a total of 600 module III hours. Prerequisite or co-requisite: VTSC4902. A grade of C or better is required for graduation.

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